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darkknightadi

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Hi,

Below is my system specs -

MOTHERBOARD (Chipset - Z370) = Asus TUF Z370 PRO gaming

CPU(Socket - LGA 1151) = i7 8700

RAM = Corsair Vengeance 16GB DDR 4

GPU = ZOTAC GAMING GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Twin Fan

SSD = Samsung 750 evo 120GB

HDD = Seagate Barracuda(Green) ST1000DM010-2EP102 1TB

PSU = Corsair vs650

While playing Star Wars Jedi Fallen Order (in 4K resolution with the all the settings maxed out), after a couple of minutes the PC restarts mid-game. This happens every time I try to play the game. I monitored the temperatures of both CPU and GPU while playing using MSI Afterburner, GPU Temp didn’t cross 85 degrees Celsius and CPU temp didn’t cross 75 degrees Celsius.

NOTE 1 – The PC doesn’t restart when I am running games such as Shadow of the Tomb Raider, Watch Dogs 2 and Just Cause 4 in 4K resolution with all the graphical settings maxed out.

So I decided to stress test both the CPU and GPU using the benchmarking tools mentioned below

Intel Extreme Tuning Utility
Cinebench R20.0
Unigine - Valley 1.0, Heaven 4.0 and Superposition
3DMark - Fire Strike Ultra and Time Spy Extreme

While running all of the above benchmarks, The PC did not restart. However, the test results of Fire Strike Ultra & Time Spy Extreme said the pc failed the test with a score of 92% and 93.6% respectively.

NOTE 2 - I have reset my BIOS settings to default and have disabled XMP as well.


What is the prob? Can someone please help?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Get a better power supply. The orange letter VS series Corsair units are REALLY poor quality. Even more so if they have been in use for a bit.

Triple that when used with a system like yours, that is all high end high TDP hardware.

Please read my recommendations:

 
Reactions: brandonw1986

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Latest motherboard BIOS installed?

Latest drivers from the motherboard product page for chipset, network adapter and audio installed?

Have you done a CLEAN install of the graphics drivers?

Obviously, the first thought here is that it's the power supply since that is usually the primary culprit of a hard restart, and since the VS series is not a premium PSU which you would expect to see in any system running at 2080 ti. I would highly recommend that you consider a higher quality power supply even though this does not seem to be a problem with supplying the necessary wattage capacity. Those VS units are older group regulated designs and might be prone to some compatibility issues with Intel platforms even with the C6/C7 states turned off in the BIOS.

Do you have an older orange lettering VS or a newer gray lettering VS?

Have you run Memtest86 to determine if it is a memory configuration or physical memory issue? If not, I would do so.

Memtest86


Go to the Passmark software website and download the USB Memtest86 free version. You can do the optical disk version too if for some reason you cannot use a bootable USB flash drive.

Create bootable media using the downloaded Memtest86 (NOT Memtest86+, that is a different, older version and is outdated). Once you have done that, go into your BIOS and configure the system to boot to the USB drive that contains the Memtest86 USB media or the optical drive if using that option.


Create a bootable USB Flash drive:

1. Download the Windows MemTest86 USB image.

2. Right click on the downloaded file and select the "Extract to Here" option. This places the USB image and imaging tool into the current folder.

3. Run the included imageUSB tool, it should already have the image file selected and you just need to choose which connected USB drive to turn into a bootable drive. Note that this will erase all data on the drive.



No memory should ever fail to pass Memtest86 when it is at the default configuration that the system sets it at when you start out or do a clear CMOS by removing the CMOS battery for five minutes.

Best method for testing memory is to first run four passes of Memtest86, all 11 tests, WITH the memory at the default configuration. This should be done BEFORE setting the memory to the XMP profile settings. The paid version has 13 tests but the free version only has tests 1-10 and test 13. So run full passes of all 11 tests. Be sure to download the latest version of Memtest86. Memtest86+ has not been updated in MANY years. It is NO-WISE as good as regular Memtest86 from Passmark software.

If there are ANY errors, at all, then the memory configuration is not stable. Bumping the DRAM voltage up slightly may resolve that OR you may need to make adjustments to the primary timings. There are very few secondary or tertiary timings that should be altered. I can tell you about those if you are trying to tighten your memory timings.

If you cannot pass Memtest86 with the memory at the XMP configuration settings then I would recommend restoring the memory to the default JEDEC SPD of 1333/2133mhz (Depending on your platform and memory type) with everything left on the auto/default configuration and running Memtest86 over again. If it completes the four full passes without error you can try again with the XMP settings but first try bumping the DRAM voltage up once again by whatever small increment the motherboard will allow you to increase it by. If it passes, great, move on to the Prime95 testing.

If it still fails, try once again bumping the voltage if you are still within the maximum allowable voltage for your memory type and test again. If it still fails, you are likely going to need more advanced help with configuring your primary timings and should return the memory to the default configuration until you can sort it out.

If the memory will not pass Memtest86 for four passes when it IS at the stock default non-XMP configuration, even after a minor bump in voltage, then there is likely something physically wrong with one or more of the memory modules and I'd recommend running Memtest on each individual module, separately, to determine which module is causing the issue. If you find a single module that is faulty you should contact the seller or the memory manufacturer and have them replace the memory as a SET. Memory comes matched for a reason as I made clear earlier and if you let them replace only one module rather than the entire set you are back to using unmatched memory which is an open door for problems with incompatible memory.

Be aware that you SHOULD run Memtest86 to test the memory at the default, non-XMP, non-custom profile settings BEFORE ever making any changes to the memory configuration so that you will know if the problem is a setting or is a physical problem with the memory.
 
Reactions: brandonw1986

darkknightadi

Reputable
Dec 4, 2016
65
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Latest motherboard BIOS installed?

Latest drivers from the motherboard product page for chipset, network adapter and audio installed?

Have you done a CLEAN install of the graphics drivers?

Obviously, the first thought here is that it's the power supply since that is usually the primary culprit of a hard restart, and since the VS series is not a premium PSU which you would expect to see in any system running at 2080 ti. I would highly recommend that you consider a higher quality power supply even though this does not seem to be a problem with supplying the necessary wattage capacity. Those VS units are older group regulated designs and might be prone to some compatibility issues with Intel platforms even with the C6/C7 states turned off in the BIOS.

Do you have an older orange lettering VS or a newer gray lettering VS?

Have you run Memtest86 to determine if it is a memory configuration or physical memory issue? If not, I would do so.

Memtest86


Go to the Passmark software website and download the USB Memtest86 free version. You can do the optical disk version too if for some reason you cannot use a bootable USB flash drive.

Create bootable media using the downloaded Memtest86 (NOT Memtest86+, that is a different, older version and is outdated). Once you have done that, go into your BIOS and configure the system to boot to the USB drive that contains the Memtest86 USB media or the optical drive if using that option.


Create a bootable USB Flash drive:

1. Download the Windows MemTest86 USB image.

2. Right click on the downloaded file and select the "Extract to Here" option. This places the USB image and imaging tool into the current folder.

3. Run the included imageUSB tool, it should already have the image file selected and you just need to choose which connected USB drive to turn into a bootable drive. Note that this will erase all data on the drive.



No memory should ever fail to pass Memtest86 when it is at the default configuration that the system sets it at when you start out or do a clear CMOS by removing the CMOS battery for five minutes.

Best method for testing memory is to first run four passes of Memtest86, all 11 tests, WITH the memory at the default configuration. This should be done BEFORE setting the memory to the XMP profile settings. The paid version has 13 tests but the free version only has tests 1-10 and test 13. So run full passes of all 11 tests. Be sure to download the latest version of Memtest86. Memtest86+ has not been updated in MANY years. It is NO-WISE as good as regular Memtest86 from Passmark software.

If there are ANY errors, at all, then the memory configuration is not stable. Bumping the DRAM voltage up slightly may resolve that OR you may need to make adjustments to the primary timings. There are very few secondary or tertiary timings that should be altered. I can tell you about those if you are trying to tighten your memory timings.

If you cannot pass Memtest86 with the memory at the XMP configuration settings then I would recommend restoring the memory to the default JEDEC SPD of 1333/2133mhz (Depending on your platform and memory type) with everything left on the auto/default configuration and running Memtest86 over again. If it completes the four full passes without error you can try again with the XMP settings but first try bumping the DRAM voltage up once again by whatever small increment the motherboard will allow you to increase it by. If it passes, great, move on to the Prime95 testing.

If it still fails, try once again bumping the voltage if you are still within the maximum allowable voltage for your memory type and test again. If it still fails, you are likely going to need more advanced help with configuring your primary timings and should return the memory to the default configuration until you can sort it out.

If the memory will not pass Memtest86 for four passes when it IS at the stock default non-XMP configuration, even after a minor bump in voltage, then there is likely something physically wrong with one or more of the memory modules and I'd recommend running Memtest on each individual module, separately, to determine which module is causing the issue. If you find a single module that is faulty you should contact the seller or the memory manufacturer and have them replace the memory as a SET. Memory comes matched for a reason as I made clear earlier and if you let them replace only one module rather than the entire set you are back to using unmatched memory which is an open door for problems with incompatible memory.

Be aware that you SHOULD run Memtest86 to test the memory at the default, non-XMP, non-custom profile settings BEFORE ever making any changes to the memory configuration so that you will know if the problem is a setting or is a physical problem with the memory.

I did everything you asked -
-Installed the latest motherboard BIOS from Asus Website
-Installed the latest drivers from Asus Website for chipset, network adapter and audio
-Did a clean install of the graphics drivers via GeForce Experience
-Its the older orange lettering VS
-I ran memtest86 and the test was successful. No errors.


The problem is still there!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Get a better power supply. The orange letter VS series Corsair units are REALLY poor quality. Even more so if they have been in use for a bit.

Triple that when used with a system like yours, that is all high end high TDP hardware.

Please read my recommendations:

 
Reactions: brandonw1986

darkknightadi

Reputable
Dec 4, 2016
65
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4,530
0
Get a better power supply. The orange letter VS series Corsair units are REALLY poor quality. Even more so if they have been in use for a bit.

Triple that when used with a system like yours, that is all high end high TDP hardware.

Please read my recommendations:


I will get a better PSU but, is 650 watts enough or should I get one with a bigger capacity???
 

darkknightadi

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Dec 4, 2016
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650w is enough, IF it is a HIGH QUALITY unit. 750w would be better if you plan to or are overclocking either the graphics card or CPU.

Capacity recommendations are listed here:

http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm

And I would highly recommend actually reading the post I linked to earlier and in my signature, if you have not already.
Hi,

Sorry for the late response, I was away for a week.

Now, After reading your post and considering my budget, I have zeroed in on two PSUs. They are -

Corsair RM650x(CP-9020091-UK)
PSU Image Link


Corsair RM750xCP-9020092-UK)
PSU Image Link

Please let me know which PSU would be the right one.

Thanks!!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Either of them will work. The 750w will give you a bit of extra headroom and probably run quieter under long session full load gaming, but they are both capable enough for that configuration. If the price difference isn't a lot, I'd go with the 750w model. If there is a major difference in price, then the 650w unit should be good enough.
 

darkknightadi

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Dec 4, 2016
65
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Either of them will work. The 750w will give you a bit of extra headroom and probably run quieter under long session full load gaming, but they are both capable enough for that configuration. If the price difference isn't a lot, I'd go with the 750w model. If there is a major difference in price, then the 650w unit should be good enough.
I ended up purchasing a Corsair RM1000x, as a local store was selling it with a heavy discount.I am delighted to inform you that after installing the new PSU the problem is solved!

Thank you so much Darkbreeze!! You are a true hero!!!
 

Dcopymope

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Aug 13, 2018
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I will get a better PSU but, is 650 watts enough or should I get one with a bigger capacity???
If you are running any program that is considered demanding or intensive, be that video games, 3D animation software or video editors, then no, it is absolutely not enough. In the I.T profession, particular the A+ certifications courses, they will teach you that you should always double the wattage of whatever your GPU requires at a minimum. Remember, your PSU powers your entire PC, so if you are running a video game application and the GPU requires a minimum of around 500 watts, then get a PSU that is capable of giving over 1000 watts. I would make sure it says "platinum series" as well, for what that is worth.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
If you are running any program that is considered demanding or intensive, be that video games, 3D animation software or video editors, then no, it is absolutely not enough. In the I.T profession, particular the A+ certifications courses, they will teach you that you should always double the wattage of whatever your GPU requires at a minimum. Remember, your PSU powers your entire PC, so if you are running a video game application and the GPU requires a minimum of around 500 watts, then get a PSU that is capable of giving over 1000 watts. I would make sure it says "platinum series" as well, for what that is worth.
This is far from accurate. I have an A+ certification and nowhere, ever, was there any guidance suggesting that by design you should double the capacity of the power supply to double what the graphics card needs. And it's not that there is necessarily anything wrong, in most cases, with running a PSU that is twice the capacity of the graphics card but it's certainly not a requirement or even a recommendation. What we like to see is about 40-60% headroom, not double the headroom. In fact, basically everything you've said is false.

Units do not need to be Platinum rated for the average user. There are many Bronze rated units that are just fine, and conversely there are Platinum and Titanium rated units I wouldn't suggest anybody to use to even power a strip of LED lights. In most cases, so long as you get a unit that is halfway decent based on reviews and has a Bronze or Gold rating, with the Gold rating being a lot more common on any units that ARE good, these days, then you will be fine. The rating is a peripheral concern, not a primary factor. The primary factor is getting a unit that has been professionally reviewed and determined to be of recommendable quality.


@darkknightadi , Glad you got it sorted out and are good to go now man. Good luck to you.
 

Dcopymope

Prominent
Aug 13, 2018
385
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695
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This is far from accurate. I have an A+ certification and nowhere, ever, was there any guidance suggesting that by design you should double the capacity of the power supply to double what the graphics card needs. And it's not that there is necessarily anything wrong, in most cases, with running a PSU that is twice the capacity of the graphics card but it's certainly not a requirement or even a recommendation. What we like to see is about 40-60% headroom, not double the headroom. In fact, basically everything you've said is false.

Units do not need to be Platinum rated for the average user. There are many Bronze rated units that are just fine, and conversely there are Platinum and Titanium rated units I wouldn't suggest anybody to use to even power a strip of LED lights. In most cases, so long as you get a unit that is halfway decent based on reviews and has a Bronze or Gold rating, with the Gold rating being a lot more common on any units that ARE good, these days, then you will be fine. The rating is a peripheral concern, not a primary factor. The primary factor is getting a unit that has been professionally reviewed and determined to be of recommendable quality.


@darkknightadi , Glad you got it sorted out and are good to go now man. Good luck to you.
Doubling the wattage is exactly what was stated in the A+ course I took. Not every A+ course will state the exact same thing, because the material is from different companies to start with. Really, common sense tells me to double the wattage if I'm running any demanding application, with high end components to boot, and especially if I'm considering overclocking. One shouldn't need a certification or degree to tell him that. Unless this guy is just using his PC to run Microsoft Office or something, I would never recommend anything less than 1000 watts as the bare minimum. I'm not trying to give the guy yet another reason to come on here complaining about his PC going haywire while playing a game, because you all told him that 700 watts was enough.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Clearly you are not only spewing senseless, blatantly false information, but you can't read either. Nowhere did I say anything about 700w being enough for anything, ever, at all. In fact, I never said 700w, period.

But whatever. I don't really have time to argue irrelevant points in a solved thread. Good luck to all.
 
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