Question PC shuts off after 20 minutes and continues to fail to reboot

Jul 9, 2021
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For the last two days my PC has shut down seemingly at random. After shutting down it will attempt to reboot but fail before making to to the desktop. It will continue to attempt to restart but each subsequent attempt is shorter until the fans/light start and immediately stop (Just a flash). If I power it down and let it "rest" the next attempt will be longer and a few times I have even made it to the desktop and been able to work but eventually it will start the entire loop over again. I am thinking power supply due to the incredibly short failed attempts. Seems as if it just isn't able to provide the needed power.

I did clean off and reapply thermal paste to my cpu/liquid cooler. I am using MSI afterburner and the CPU is not overheating. I performed a memory diagnostic that found no issues with my RAM.

I am running out of ideas and am ready to wipe my ssds in an attempt to fix this but I do suspect that it is a hardware issue. Any ideas on what this may be or how to troubleshoot further would be GREATLY appreciated.

Specs:
CPU: Intel i5 7600
GPU: 1080
RAM: Corsair 4 sticks of 4Gigs 2400
PSU: EVGA 500W
MoBo: Can't remember off the top of my head (sorry). I will update the thread when I get home from work if that will help.
 

revodo

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BANNED
Jun 10, 2021
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Unlikely Reasons: Hard Drive, RAM, Heat, Software, Cables
Likely Reasons: PSU, Motherboard, CPU

You already ruled out one of the likely reasons, so you're left with a problem with the motherboard, or the CPU itself. That's my best guess.
 

Udyr

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Mar 3, 2021
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Upgraded to a 700W. Same issue. Im completely out of ideas.
This is why the constant suggestion on this forum to change your "crappy" PSU should not be the first option to consider. Waste of time and money.

A similar situation happened to me, but I figured it out by myself: the motherboard started to die. I was lucky to have a friend with a similar build and tested all the working parts. I made a new build because I was about to do so anyway, so I ended up building a second PC with the old working parts (including a "crappy" Thermaltake Smart PSU). My new build worked fine with the Smart PSU, but I ended up getting a new PSU to use the Smart on the second build.

Like @revodo said: keep ruling out things until you find out, and don't buy new parts until you do so.
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
This is why the constant suggestion on this forum to change your "crappy" PSU should not be the first option to consider. Waste of time and money.
Like @revodo said: keep ruling out things until you find out, and don't buy new parts until you do so.
Replacing a junk power supply (for a 1080 at least) is not a waste of time and money, except to the negligent. You replace a known junk part first, especially when there are specific observable symptoms because the junk part ought to be replaced anyway. We fix a lot of people's PCs here and a new PSU resolves these issues a good chunk of the time.

The next step, assuming your temperatures are fine, would be to remove the GPU completely and stress your machine with the integrated graphics.
 

Udyr

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Mar 3, 2021
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Replacing a junk power supply (for a 1080 at least) is not a waste of time and money, except to the negligent. You replace a known junk part first, especially when there are specific observable symptoms because the junk part ought to be replaced anyway. We fix a lot of people's PCs here and a new PSU resolves these issues a good chunk of the time.

The next step, assuming your temperatures are fine, would be to remove the GPU completely and stress your machine with the integrated graphics.
"A good chunk of the time" doesn't mean all the time. Many are under very short budget and since they don't know better are forced to change whatever part was suggested, even if that doesn't solve the issue in the end. PC troubleshooting starts from the basics up to "change your house if you must". I am not against quality PSUs, but a "junky" unit doesn't mean your parts will spontaneously blow up all the time.
 

Udyr

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Mar 3, 2021
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It's a diagnosis, not magic.

You're perfectly free to try and help person number...four...rather than complain about advice that you don't like.
A similar situation happened to me, but I figured it out by myself: the motherboard started to die. I was lucky to have a friend with a similar build and tested all the working parts. I made a new build because I was about to do so anyway, so I ended up building a second PC with the old working parts (including a "crappy" Thermaltake Smart PSU). My new build worked fine with the Smart PSU, but I ended up getting a new PSU to use the Smart on the second build.

Like @revodo said: keep ruling out things until you find out, and don't buy new parts until you do so.
And what did I do here? It's not a matter of liking. Bad advice is bad advice. "My fan is not spinning" doesn't mean replace the PSU; it means check the fan and the connections first, then when everything fails, maybe... just maybe it's the PSU.
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
And what did I do here? It's not a matter of liking. Bad advice is bad advice. "My fan is not spinning" doesn't mean replace the PSU; it means check the fan and the connections first, then when everything fails, maybe... just maybe it's the PSU.
Except it needs to be replaced anyway.

A completely inappropriate PSU is a complicating factor in any diagnosis. Even if it's not the direct cause, when you encounter one, you replace it.

Our goal here is to fix all the problems seen. Not just "hey, I used a crappy PSU for a while too, so it's totally a good idea, brah." Or, are you providing a warranty for this user's GPU with this PSU? If so, please message them and provide your contact information for reimbursement of future issues.
 

Udyr

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Mar 3, 2021
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Except it needs to be replaced anyway.

A completely inappropriate PSU is a complicating factor in any diagnosis. Even if it's not the direct cause, when you encounter one, you replace it.

Our goal here is to fix all the problems seen. Not just "hey, I used a crappy PSU for a while too, so it's totally a good idea, brah." Or, are you providing a warranty for this user's GPU with this PSU? If so, please message them and provide your contact information for reimbursement of future issues.
There's a huge difference between providing simple steps to solve someones issue and then recommending to switch X part because of possible future issues than recommending to change a specific part as the main solution to the issue at hand... and if you took the time to read, I clearly indicated I am not against a quality PSU.
 

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