Question PC unusable after upgrade, desperate for some advice.

Apr 25, 2021
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Hi guy's

Really hoping I can get some help on this.
I've got a sff dell optiplex 9010, pretty standard workplace pc but it's been upgraded to suit my needs.
Spec as follows:

i7 3770 4 CPU'S @ 3.40ghz
24gb ram (16gb recently added)
NVIDIA GT 1030 low profile

Ever since I added 16gb of ram (2x 8 gb sticks) and the new graphics card, I've had so many BOD'S)
Ranging from -
NTFS_FILE_SYSTEM_error
Memory_Management error
IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL
System error

The PSU is about 10watts off what is recommended for my graphics card but I was told it should cope, so I may need a better PSU.

I believe it is largely a driver issue, I downgraded my geforce driver and had about 3 weeks without any issues but now the bsod is back frequently.

Really need some input from an expert, any comments appreciated. Thanks
 

barryeslick

Commendable
Sep 27, 2018
3
1
1,515
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Try running the PC with only the original RAM. There might be an issue with the new RAM. If that works, try each of the 2 new RAM sticks on their own. You can download RAM analysers which could pick up errors in your RAM.
 
Reactions: sizzling
Apr 25, 2021
8
0
10
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Try running the PC with only the original RAM. There might be an issue with the new RAM. If that works, try each of the 2 new RAM sticks on their own. You can download RAM analysers which could pick up errors in your RAM.
Did this, now I can't even get into windows. Says inaccessible boot device
 

jasonf2

Honorable
Oct 11, 2015
411
108
11,040
38
On a component built machine the motherboard has to be designed to be as flexible as possible with components such as ram. So more often than not there is a QVL on a motherboard that gives guidance on tested compatible hardware and workable clock setups. I always suggest using the QVL when selecting RAM because of this. When a prebuilt box is released the manufacturer is only really needing to verify their specific vendor parts that are being put into the machine. They almost always offer a backchannel upgrade path that is twice as expensive as going to the retail store that no one really uses. But because of this they rarely if ever offer a QVL list for upgrades and if they do you will have to really dig. This makes purchasing parts like RAM kind of a game of Russian roulette for those machines. Make sure that the base specs are correct, buy in complete kit and don't expect to go any further than SPD settings and it typically will work. When it doesn't though you are usually left trying another brand/kit to get it to work. Those setups are also notorious for using shared memory structures and system resources between GPU, mainline RAM. and PCI bus. Make sure to check bios and disable anything related to the integrated GPU when using a discrete GPU addon. My son inadvertently explained it to almost perfection. When you buy a prebuilt pc what you are really getting is a laptop with a chassis that looks like a desktop with some parts that can run without battery.
 
Apr 25, 2021
8
0
10
0
On a component built machine the motherboard has to be designed to be as flexible as possible with components such as ram. So more often than not there is a QVL on a motherboard that gives guidance on tested compatible hardware and workable clock setups. I always suggest using the QVL when selecting RAM because of this. When a prebuilt box is released the manufacturer is only really needing to verify their specific vendor parts that are being put into the machine. They almost always offer a backchannel upgrade path that is twice as expensive as going to the retail store that no one really uses. But because of this they rarely if ever offer a QVL list for upgrades and if they do you will have to really dig. This makes purchasing parts like RAM kind of a game of Russian roulette for those machines. Make sure that the base specs are correct, buy in complete kit and don't expect to go any further than SPD settings and it typically will work. When it doesn't though you are usually left trying another brand/kit to get it to work. Those setups are also notorious for using shared memory structures and system resources between GPU, mainline RAM. and PCI bus. Make sure to check bios and disable anything related to the integrated GPU when using a discrete GPU addon. My son inadvertently explained it to almost perfection. When you buy a prebuilt pc what you are really getting is a laptop with a chassis that looks like a desktop with some parts that can run without battery.
would the crucial compatibility advisor suffice for finding what I need or still not 100% accurate?
 

jasonf2

Honorable
Oct 11, 2015
411
108
11,040
38
would the crucial compatibility advisor suffice for finding what I need or still not 100% accurate?
If the crucial compatibility advisor specifically lists your machine there is a good chance that crucial tested the kit on the machine and at the very least it is going to be to spec. That isn't a guarantee by any means but better than simply going to the store and picking up a memory kit. I know it has been mentioned before but do not mix and match RAM sticks. If you are upgrading to 16, buy 16 as a kit and remove the old memory. RAM is a pooled resource and the subtle differences of even sticks of the same brand and type unmatched can be problematic at times. Kits are built to match and rarely give problems. Mix and matching RAM is one of the things that a lot of people end up in this forum over. Also if you are not familiar with RAM the advertised clock rate is rarely based on the SPD settings, but rather an XMP profile (which is an overclock) or a proven speed on a given machine. So if you are buying compatible 3000mhz RAM sticks, but your board can only handle 2666mhz and you run the RAM at 3000mhz the whole system will be unstable. This is why InvalidError was recommending a slight downclock even from SPD. Minor RAM clocking issues can exhibit as intermittent BSOD even when everything tests ok.
 

hang-the-9

Titan
Moderator
HDD had an error, fixed now. Computer seems fine with the stock ram but doesn't cope with the additional 16gb of 'crucial' memory. Memory issue bsod
Did you buy the RAM from the Crucial memory adviser that listed it as compatible? Did you check for a newer BIOS for the system? Although RAM does not need much power, you having the 1030 card in it on the weak stock PSU may be causing issues. The more variables you have the harder to find the issue. Try using the system after a BIOS update and remove the video card but install the new RAM (without the old RAM).
 

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