Question PC will turn on but no Post or video display

Jul 17, 2021
17
0
10
0
Ok so I built my first computer and It was working just fine then about 2 days after I built it I shut it down and when I tried to turn it back on it wouldn't post I have watched countless videos got a new motherboard and CPU and nothing is working I'm really just trying to figure out what's going on i thought it might have been a non updated Bios problem because I bought a Ryzen 5 and I originally had a Ryzen 3 but the bios it came with or that the sticker said it came with was the first one that supported Ryzen 5 so I'm really lost and stuck any advice appreciated thanks in advance
 

punkncat

Dignified
Ambassador
Those "such and such (generation) ready" or "supports xxxx" can simply mean that there is a BIOS revision to make it possible.

It would be far more helpful for us to offer advice if you would clarify what your parts are and a timeline of the mobo and CPU swap in relation to it working, then not.
 
Jul 17, 2021
17
0
10
0
Those "such and such (generation) ready" or "supports xxxx" can simply mean that there is a BIOS revision to make it possible.

It would be far more helpful for us to offer advice if you would clarify what your parts are and a timeline of the mobo and CPU swap in relation to it working, then not.
So I originally had a msi b450 pro m2-max motherboard and a Ryzen 3 2200 g I bought a new motherboard a ASRock b550M-HDV which was Ryzen 3 ready I put the Ryzen 3 in and it wouldn't work so today I got a Ryzen 5 2600 and it wouldn't work either now the Ryzen 3 was from a friend and I think it had bent pins and was busted but I got it to somehow work for a few days then I checked the bios version on my motherboard via the sticker and went to the website and it said it was the first bios update they released for my motherboard
 
Jul 17, 2021
17
0
10
0
O
QUOTE="punkncat, post: 22389241, member: 2524155"]
Click the link I supplied above. Click support down the page and CPU compatibility. It lists every CPU that is capable of working on that motherboard. It also lists what BIOS revision is needed for said.
[/QUOTE]
Oh ok I see thank you so if I get a motherboard that supports it it should post?
 

punkncat

Dignified
Ambassador
Ok what does that exactly mean and do you know off the top of your head any motherboards that are around the same price
For Ryzen you have chipsets from 350/370. Work with first gen and plus gen with a BIOS update (1xxx/2xxx CPU models)
450/470 typically work with plus and second gen CPU (2xxx/3xxx CPU models). It starts getting complicated here such that you HAVE to check compatibility on what works with what.

550 and 570 ONLY work with 3xxx and 5xxx CPU models.

If your case will fit it, the Tomahawk B450 is considered a very good mobo. Traditional pricing has them ~$100 or so.

EDIT- it is notable to mention that the "G" series CPU and 4xxx series CPU are outliers that I don't specifically mention as it gets "complicated". Also of mention is that some of the 4xx chipsets can work with 5xxx CPU as well.
To throw even more shade are the 320 and 520 chipsets.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: Loadedaxe

punkncat

Dignified
Ambassador
Of note here, as you don't mention.

Your G model CPU had onboard graphics. The 2600 (and any chip without that G designation) does not have onboard graphics and will require a dedicated GPU to produce video output.
 
Jul 17, 2021
17
0
10
0
For Ryzen you have chipsets from 350/370. Work with first gen and plus gen with a BIOS update (1xxx/2xxx CPU models)
450/470 typically work with plus and second gen CPU (2xxx/3xxx CPU models). It starts getting complicated here such that you HAVE to check compatibility on what works with what.

550 and 570 ONLY work with 3xxx and 5xxx CPU models.

If your case will fit it, the Tomahawk B450 is considered a very good mobo. Traditional pricing has them ~$100 or so.
I found the Gigabyte B450M Ds3h v2 and went to their website and it said it supports the 5 2600 but that wasn't the v2 I couldn't find the v2
 
Jul 17, 2021
17
0
10
0
Yes, as a for instance. Shop for feature and price. Open another browser tab and double check the manufacturers site to see what it works with.
Ok thank you on the website for the one I'm looking at it has like core name does that matter or do all 5 2600 have the same core also is there a way to check what bios version it comes with
 

punkncat

Dignified
Ambassador
I am not sure what you mean by "core name".

Most motherboards come with the lowest level of BIOS listed on the support page. The exception generally are boards marked "Max" such as the Tomahawk I mentioned. The standard model is set for a 2xxx CPU where the Max model is already capable of 3xxx CPU out of the box.
The single easiest thing is to browse the top listed features. It will say stuff like, ready for Ryzen 3, ready for Ryzen 5, etc. meaning the model # (3xxx/5xxx). THEN go look at the CPU compat list and see if the same BIOS revision as the lowest offered supports the CPU you have on hand.

For instance it could say:
Ryzen 5 2600 and than have some string of number/letter for the BIOS revision. For the sake of ease, let us say that BIOS rev 1 works on the 2600. But then below you might see Ryzen 5 3600 and BIOS rev 2. This would insinuate that you have to have a 2600 running to then update the BIOS in order for it to work with the 3600. The Max version come out of the box on rev 2. (this is a for instance, I pulled those rev # from my butt)

Some new motherboards offer a feature where you can update the BIOS before setup via a special USB slot on back and a button. I do not suggest going this way unless you are familiar, know what you are doing, or know someone that is.
 
Jul 17, 2021
17
0
10
0
I am not sure what you mean by "core name".

Most motherboards come with the lowest level of BIOS listed on the support page. The exception generally are boards marked "Max" such as the Tomahawk I mentioned. The standard model is set for a 2xxx CPU where the Max model is already capable of 3xxx CPU out of the box.
The single easiest thing is to browse the top listed features. It will say stuff like, ready for Ryzen 3, ready for Ryzen 5, etc. meaning the model # (3xxx/5xxx). THEN go look at the CPU compat list and see if the same BIOS revision as the lowest offered supports the CPU you have on hand.

For instance it could say:
Ryzen 5 2600 and than have some string of number/letter for the BIOS revision. For the sake of ease, let us say that BIOS rev 1 works on the 2600. But then below you might see Ryzen 5 3600 and BIOS rev 2. This would insinuate that you have to have a 2600 running to then update the BIOS in order for it to work with the 3600. The Max version come out of the box on rev 2. (this is a for instance, I pulled those rev # from my butt)

Some new motherboards offer a feature where you can update the BIOS before setup via a special USB slot on back and a button. I do not suggest going this way unless you are familiar, know what you are doing, or know someone that is.
Also the computer worked for like 2 days and then stopped for no reason and when this happened I had a msi motherboard and the debug light was on cpu so when I get this new motherboard that actually is compatible with my CPU should my computer post?
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY