[SOLVED] Pc won’t post with new ram, old ram still works fine

forza21.md

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Sep 29, 2017
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Specs
Ryzen 5600x
MSI x570 edge wifi
8gb (single) 2400mhz wanting to upgrade to 16gb 3200mhz (2 dims)
gtx 1060 6gb
980 Samsung evo m.2
Cx550m PsU

When i install the new ram all the fans get really loud but it does not post or anything, there is a motherboard light that says CPU?
When I take out the old ram, from any slot and even just 1 stick and put the old one in it boots up perfectly fine, according to Kingston my ram is compatible with the mobo so what can I do to fix it?
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Model number should be on the package you just opened.

Kingston does not have a great track record of compatibility with Ryzen platforms. It's very hit or miss even for models that are indicated as validated on the QVL list. I'd recommend returning them and going with a model from G.Skill that shows as compatible on the G.Skill memory configurator.

https://www.gskill.com/configurator

Probably higher quality and less expensive anyhow.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Did you buy the new memory new or used?

WHICH slots, exactly, starting at the CPU socket and moving towards the edge of the motherboard, 1, 2, 3, 4, with 4 being the slot closest to the edge of the motherboard, are you attempting to install the new DIMMs in?
 

forza21.md

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Did you buy the new memory new or used?

WHICH slots, exactly, starting at the CPU socket and moving towards the edge of the motherboard, 1, 2, 3, 4, with 4 being the slot closest to the edge of the motherboard, are you attempting to install the new DIMMs in?
For that I’ve tried 1,2,3,4 and then 2+4 and it’s just giving a ram LED on the mobo

and it’s brand new I just unsealed it
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Have you tried a single stick of the new RAM in the A2 slot, which is the second slot over from the CPU?

And then, if that didn't work, swap it out for the other new stick in the same slot?

Then, try each of them in the B2 slot, which is the fourth slot away from the CPU?

If so, and the old memory works, then I'd say either the new memory is not compatible or is damaged.

But, first I'd try installing them in the second and fourth slots, and then do a hard reset of the BIOS.

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.



What is the exact model of the memory kit you are trying to use?
 

forza21.md

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Sep 29, 2017
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Have you tried a single stick of the new RAM in the A2 slot, which is the second slot over from the CPU?

And then, if that didn't work, swap it out for the other new stick in the same slot?

Then, try each of them in the B2 slot, which is the fourth slot away from the CPU?

If so, and the old memory works, then I'd say either the new memory is not compatible or is damaged.

But, first I'd try installing them in the second and fourth slots, and then do a hard reset of the BIOS.

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.



What is the exact model of the memory kit you are trying to use?
Kingston Fury Beast 8gb 3200mhz, idk the model number
 

forza21.md

Reputable
Sep 29, 2017
15
0
4,510
0
Have you tried a single stick of the new RAM in the A2 slot, which is the second slot over from the CPU?

And then, if that didn't work, swap it out for the other new stick in the same slot?

Then, try each of them in the B2 slot, which is the fourth slot away from the CPU?

If so, and the old memory works, then I'd say either the new memory is not compatible or is damaged.

But, first I'd try installing them in the second and fourth slots, and then do a hard reset of the BIOS.

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.



What is the exact model of the memory kit you are trying to use?
Just tried the mobo reset, did not work unfortunately
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Model number should be on the package you just opened.

Kingston does not have a great track record of compatibility with Ryzen platforms. It's very hit or miss even for models that are indicated as validated on the QVL list. I'd recommend returning them and going with a model from G.Skill that shows as compatible on the G.Skill memory configurator.

https://www.gskill.com/configurator

Probably higher quality and less expensive anyhow.
 

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