Question PC won't power on when GPU connected, PC boots without GPU

Mar 19, 2023
3
1
15
PC specs
I5 10400
Asus b560 ma
16gb hyper x ram
1050 ti
MSI MAG550W

I was playing gta online yesterday then suddenly the pc shut down and wont start. After some troubleshooting the pc started to boot without the gpu connected to the pcie slot, any fixes please?
 
How old is the build? Possibly the power supply is having issues. The slot could give the gpu 75 watts if there’s no power connector on the card, so if it starts up without the card, then I would suggest seeing if you can test with a different power supply. If nothing changes then maybe test with another card. You might see if you can try the gpu in another pc though.
 
Mar 19, 2023
3
1
15
How old is the build? Possibly the power supply is having issues. The slot could give the gpu 75 watts if there’s no power connector on the card, so if it starts up without the card, then I would suggest seeing if you can test with a different power supply. If nothing changes then maybe test with another card. You might see if you can try the gpu in another pc though.
The pc is less than 2 years old ill try and test it with another card I have at home unfortuntely I do not have a spare psu or a spare pc.
 
Dec 7, 2022
54
12
45
PC specs
I5 10400
Asus b560 ma
16gb hyper x ram
1050 ti
MSI MAG550W

I was playing gta online yesterday then suddenly the pc shut down and wont start. After some troubleshooting the pc started to boot without the gpu connected to the pcie slot, any fixes please?

Have you tried clearing the CMOS? That's fixed more than one weird GPU POST/Boot issue and is a simple thing to try.

Save your BIOS settings before you clear the CMOS though.

If not that, trying your GPU ln a friend's PC may prove insightful. You're looking to isolate either your GPU or your PSU
 
Most likely, but not definitely. A faulty power supply could cause the same issue.
That is a possibility but a faulty PSU would most likely affect other parts of the system as well. We're also talking about a 75W GTX 1050 here, a card that doesn't need an extra connector. It's not exactly a major strain on any PSU, not even a brand-in-a-box OEM PSU.

The PSU could be the issue but in my 30+ years of PC building, if a PC works without a certain part but doesn't work with it, the part in question has been the problem 100% of the time.
 

Richj444

Prominent
May 25, 2022
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That is a possibility but a faulty PSU would most likely affect other parts of the system as well. We're also talking about a 75W GTX 1050 here, a card that doesn't need an extra connector. It's not exactly a major strain on any PSU, not even a brand-in-a-box OEM PSU.

The PSU could be the issue but in my 30+ years of PC building, if a PC works without a certain part but doesn't work with it, the part in question has been the problem 100% of the time.
When you say a faulty PSU would most likely affect other parts, do you mean something like, say, "cause the PC to shut down and not start?" :)

I'm really surprised in 30% years of PC building you haven't come across a situation where adding a GPU caused a PSU to crash. Whether it's a 75W or 200W, a defective PSU has a limit somewhere. Exceeding that limit crashes the system. Removing the GPU, or replacing with a less demanding GPU, might allow the system to boot again because the power demand now drops below the critical threshhold.

Since we're comparing epeens here, you win. I've only been building PCs for 28 years. Congratulations :)
 
When you say a faulty PSU would most likely affect other parts, do you mean something like, say, "cause the PC to shut down and not start?" :)

I'm really surprised in 30% years of PC building you haven't come across a situation where adding a GPU caused a PSU to crash. Whether it's a 75W or 200W, a defective PSU has a limit somewhere. Exceeding that limit crashes the system. Removing the GPU, or replacing with a less demanding GPU, might allow the system to boot again because the power demand now drops below the critical threshhold.

Since we're comparing epeens here, you win. I've only been building PCs for 28 years. Congratulations :)
Well, I never said that it can't be that, I just said that I've never seen it happen and I only said that I'd been building PCs for 30+ years to give context to my words. It's true though, every single time that I've seen a PSU issue, it was either dead or it wasn't. In any case, the OP confirmed my suspicions.

If I wanted to brag, I wouldn't have said 30+ years, I'd have said 34¾ years. That way I'd also get to show off my skill with old-school ASCII codes.

As for e-peens, it just means that mine is older and more shriveled. ;):p
 

Richj444

Prominent
May 25, 2022
101
17
585
Well, I never said that it can't be that, I just said that I've never seen it happen and I only said that I'd been building PCs for 30+ years to give context to my words. It's true though, every single time that I've seen a PSU issue, it was either dead or it wasn't. In any case, the OP confirmed my suspicions.

If I wanted to brag, I wouldn't have said 30+ years, I'd have said 34¾ years. That way I'd also get to show off my skill with old-school ASCII codes.

As for e-peens, it just means that mine is older and more shriveled. ;):p
Thank you for taking that line in the spirit I meant it :)

My only concern in pointing that out was that I have seen all kinds of weird issues caused by PSU's, including ones just like the OPs. As I mentioned in my first post, you were absolutely right and it was most likely the GPU, but there was that chance and I'd hate for people to totally discount the possibility without checking, that's all.
Have a good one!

Edit: BTW, 34 years? Daaaang. I got in pretty early, but you were there absolutely at the beginning. Congrats on that!
 
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Thank you. I can't really take credit for it though, it's because my stepfather was a bit of a nut. For my birthday in 1988, he gave me parts to build my own PC. For four years before that, he had been teaching me how PCs are put together using our IBM PC (Model 5150) that he bought in 1984 (for $1500!).

I found out years later that just the ATi EGA Wonder card in my first build had cost over $500CAD by itself! He had been using it for a year in our IBM PC but he got himself a 386DX-20 with an ATi VGA Wonder for it so I guess it was just a really expensive hand-me-down.

Add to that a 286-16 CPU, a Biostar Baby AT motherboard, 1MB of RAM and two 20MB MFM hard drives with an RLL controller to double their capacity. Then of course the case and the 250W PSU (which was considered potent back then). I made that thing last by using it for a BBS in the early 90s.

If you've been at it for 28 years, then the only knowledge I have that you don't is completely irrelevant today (because it's from the 80s). This isn't exactly rocket science, it's just personal computers and I would consider your opinion to be just as valid as mine.

I'm not the egotistical type and I generally don't say anything about other posts. If I agree with it, I say so but I will also say if a recommendation is potentially harmful (like recommending a generic POS PSU) or excessively stupid (like someone quoting LoserBenchmark). ;)
 

Richj444

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May 25, 2022
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Thank you. I can't really take credit for it though, it's because my stepfather was a bit of a nut. For my birthday in 1988, he gave me parts to build my own PC. For four years before that, he had been teaching me how PCs are put together using our IBM PC (Model 5150) that he bought in 1984 (for $1500!).

I found out years later that just the ATi EGA Wonder card in my first build had cost over $500CAD by itself! He had been using it for a year in our IBM PC but he got himself a 386DX-20 with an ATi VGA Wonder for it so I guess it was just a really expensive hand-me-down.

Add to that a 286-16 CPU, a Biostar Baby AT motherboard, 1MB of RAM and two 20MB MFM hard drives with an RLL controller to double their capacity. Then of course the case and the 250W PSU (which was considered potent back then). I made that thing last by using it for a BBS in the early 90s.

If you've been at it for 28 years, then the only knowledge I have that you don't is completely irrelevant today (because it's from the 80s). This isn't exactly rocket science, it's just personal computers and I would consider your opinion to be just as valid as mine.

I'm not the egotistical type and I generally don't say anything about other posts. If I agree with it, I say so but I will also say if a recommendation is potentially harmful (like recommending a generic POS PSU) or excessively stupid (like someone quoting LoserBenchmark). ;)
So just to date myself, my first PC was a generic 386SX-16 (I think 16, can't be positive at this point), bought somewhere around 1991-92. Hmm...maybe closer to thirty years ago I guess. I bought it from some shop that was set up in a mall department store. Guy gave me the best advice ever when I was leaning towards a PC that came with some games and other software. He told me invest in the hardware and that I could upgrade it later as need be. I had that original case nearly 15 years, by which time I'd swapped out every part multiple times. I was always grateful that I listened to the guy.
 
So just to date myself, my first PC was a generic 386SX-16 (I think 16, can't be positive at this point), bought somewhere around 1991-92. Hmm...maybe closer to thirty years ago I guess. I bought it from some shop that was set up in a mall department store. Guy gave me the best advice ever when I was leaning towards a PC that came with some games and other software. He told me invest in the hardware and that I could upgrade it later as need be. I had that original case nearly 15 years, by which time I'd swapped out every part multiple times. I was always grateful that I listened to the guy.
Yep, the first 386sx CPUs had turbo speeds of 16MHz so I think that you're right.

You know, I miss those small computer shops that were staffed by real experts instead of the minimum-wage monkeys you see today.
 
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