[SOLVED] PCI-e and Sata 3 SSD speed paradox (need an expert)

R1 owner

Commendable
Apr 10, 2017
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Hello there tech savvy people,
I'm having an itching question that needs to be answered satisfactory by a storage tech expert.

Main question : Does more SSD writing speed worth it at all?

Here's a random example;
Sata 3 Samsung 860 QVO 1TB

Advertised Read Speed : 550MB/s
Advertised Write Speed : 520MB/a

But in reality so many people are reporting that, on SSDs with this speed range, write speed go down drastically.
Even down to 120-130MB/s (Which is even slower than a Sata HDD in some cases)

on the other hand;
NVMe M.2 Corsair MP510 240GB
Advertised Read Speed : 3100MB/s
Advertised Write Speed : 1050MB/a

  1. Will this minimum 2x improvement on PCI-e SSD write speed go down aswell? What does the reports say?
  2. Which is actually PRACTICALLY worth: putting my money into writing speed? or read speed?
  3. There are PCI-e SSD models that give +3000MB/s read speed but 520MB/s write speed aswell. What's the reason and practical use for this option?
  4. What are the main reasons for Sata 3 SSD low write speed? And what are the known fixes?
Because I feel like I'll be fine if I can get a Sata SSD work on ADVERTISED speeds, So I can put money into the SIZE of storage, rather than speed that I might not actually need.


Also I have this bad boy on my radar: (But I'm contemplating if It actually worth buying)
NVMe M.2 Samsung 970 EVO Plus 250GB
Advertised Read Speed : 3500MB/a
Advertised Write Speed : 2300MB/s


Please guide me with facts and actual reports,
Keep in mind that I will be using this machine for multi channel audio production & video editing & rendering. Using large VST files and working on large Video files
I have 2x8GB of DDR4 3200MHz RAM
Motherboard will be MSI B450-A PRO or MSI B450M PRO-M2


Thank you for reading through:)
 
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I wouldn't recommend QLC SSDs (Intel 660p or Samsung QVO) for anything except secondary drives.

What country are you in?

For your use case, yes, the greater read/write capabilities of an NVMe SSD is worth it compared to what you'd get from a SATA one, but price has to be taken into consideration. I certainly wouldn't recommend a 250GB SSD for your usage. We should be able to find a happy medium between performance and capacity for your budget.
 

popatim

Titan
Moderator
Since you will be working with large files, the QLC drives may not be for you.

You may already be aware that they use a portion of the unused flash in SLC mode as a high speed buffer and once the buffer is full you drop to native speeds (hence the 'slow as a hard drive' reports)

Reads are not an issue; the buffer only affects writes. How large will your files be?
And why such a small SSD? If your files will actually be on another drive then that is the one that will be impacting your speeds.
 

R1 owner

Commendable
Apr 10, 2017
35
1
1,535
0
Since you will be working with large files, the QLC drives may not be for you.

You may already be aware that they use a portion of the unused flash in SLC mode as a high speed buffer and once the buffer is full you drop to native speeds (hence the 'slow as a hard drive' reports)
Yeah I don't want that. I wasn't aware. It appears that there are new terms that I need to learn about such as slc mlc tlc qlc..


How large will your files be?
And why such a small SSD?
The singular files are minimum 3-9GB each, In total, files vary between 300 - 400 GB (I delete some after finishing working on them)
Then I need an SSD about 500GB that is consistent in write & read speeds.
But there are so many options and I'm quite confused.
 
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R1 owner

Commendable
Apr 10, 2017
35
1
1,535
0
I wouldn't recommend QLC SSDs (Intel 660p or Samsung QVO) for anything except secondary drives.

What country are you in?

For your use case, yes, the greater read/write capabilities of an NVMe SSD is worth it compared to what you'd get from a SATA one, but price has to be taken into consideration. I certainly wouldn't recommend a 250GB SSD for your usage. We should be able to find a happy medium between performance and capacity for your budget.
Thank you for your response,

Living in Turkey, which has an outrageous conversion rate (1USD = 6TRY)
So I'm trying to be as conservative as I can, but I'm not really going to buy something that is below my expectations and requirements just because it's cheaper.

It appears I don't really need space more than 500GB, on an SSD, maybe I can even manage 250GB, but windows takes a lot of space so I don't really know. Safer bet is 500GB,
If the drive has consistent quality, I'll go for it. (referring to write speed drops. I don't really want that trouble)

I can swap files that I will be working on with my 2TB storage to my SSD that is not a problem.
 

Endre

Proper
Apr 30, 2019
219
25
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I own a “bad boy” like that as my OS drive, partition C (Samsung 970 EVO Plus 250GB).
Before that I had as my OS boot drive the Kingston HyperX Predator 240GB SATA3 (560MB/s read, 520MB/s write).

My conclusion after months of usage is that you will “feel” the speed in everything that you’ll do:
Installing programs, copying large files, loading programs, internet usage, boot time etc.
Everything is more “snappy”.
Buying it it’s good business.
 
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