PCIe 3.0 is Here; PCIe 4.0 Already in the Works

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zorky9

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[citation][nom]soma42[/nom]now just to get a video card that uses all of the PCIe 3.0...[/citation]
... and a CPU to handle all the bandwidth.

I'll wait for Ivy Bridge and mobo/GPU with PCIe 3.0 for my next upgrade.
 

claec

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Intel has been non-committal as to whether it will license Thunderbolt to PCI Express add-on card developers. The technology is certainly feasible: a four lane PCI Express 3.0 connection slot, operating at a speed of 4 GB/s (or 32 Gigabits per second), could easily host a 10 Megabit per second Thunderbolt PCI Express add-on card.
Is that supposed to be 10 GIGAbits per second for the Thunderbolt?
 

utengineer

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[citation][nom]warmon6[/nom]So is every one happy now that the three 3's are all officially out? Usb 3.0, Sata III (6gb/s), and (finally) PCI-e 3.0.[/citation]

Yes, Rainman is happy now ;)
 

RazberyBandit

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If board makers would flat-out drop 2.0 and fully adopt 2.1, video cards that require 2 x 6-pin (or 1 x 6-pin + 1 x 6+2-pin) would be a thing of the past because the motherboard could actually supply 150W through the PCIe slot itself.

PCIe technology is evolving faster than manufacturers seem willing to adopt it.
 

SteelCity1981

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[citation][nom]Netherscourge[/nom]Has PCI-e 2.0 been maxed out yet, in everyday desktop application?[/citation]

Nope. Not even gpu's are maxed out with pci-e 2.0
 

feeddagoat

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Very nice, tho current lanes aren't saturated yet. Even so technology marches on! Anyone know if the new spec will also include higher power delivery specs considering some GPU's are breaking the current one?
 

utengineer

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[citation][nom]Netherscourge[/nom]Has PCI-e 2.0 been maxed out yet, in everyday desktop application?[/citation]

Yes, if you are looking at enterprise solutions which outweigh the high end GPU market. HBA and NIC tech is pushing the limits and creating a demand for more I/O and bandwidth.
 

huron

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It's not that I don't agree that pushing the standard is a good thing, but the fact that we can't even saturate the current interface makes this a lot less exciting.

It seems like the closest things we'll get will be the extreme SSDs that are essentially drives on the expansion slot (doesn't OCZ have one now?)
 
G

Guest

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Below is an exert by "Another DimWit" From the toms hardware forums. Thought it might be interesting to share.

"PCIe 2.0 delivers 5 GT/s, but employs an 8b/10b encoding scheme which results in a 20 percent ((10-8)/10) overhead on the raw bit rate. PCIe 3.0 removes the requirement for 8b/10b encoding and instead uses a technique called "scrambling" in which "a known binary polynomial is applied to a data stream in a feedback topology. Because the scrambling polynomial is known, the data can be recovered by running it through a feedback topology using the inverse polynomial and also uses a 128b/130b ((130-128)/130)encoding scheme, reducing the overhead to approximately 1.5%, as opposed to the 20% overhead of 8b/10b encoding used by PCIe 2.0. PCIe 3.0's 8 GT/s bit rate effectively delivers double PCIe 2.0 bandwidth"
 

proxy711

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[citation][nom]someguynamedmatt[/nom]PCIe 3.0 is Here; PCIe 4.0 Already in the Works; PCIe 2.0 Still Not Taken Advantage of.[/citation]
Id rather them be way ahead of the game then behind and have issues.
 

drwho1

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I'm wondering... Will manufactures find the "need" to develop and promote the use of SLI/CrossFire? At this speeds on this article, I just can't see why.
 

iamtheking123

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[citation][nom]drwho1[/nom]I'm wondering... Will manufactures find the "need" to develop and promote the use of SLI/CrossFire? At this speeds on this article, I just can't see why.[/citation]
I think you're confused. The reason you don't see faster video cards isn't because they max out the x16 slot. In fact, most cards won't even max the x8 slots.
 

11796pcs

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[citation][nom]mcd023[/nom]am I the only one that hasn't really seen any thunderbolt products?[/citation]
Check out the new Apple PCs, they're the only products I've seen that use the ports. Also does anyone actually understand the picture in the article- it doesn't seem to actually correspond to the article. Also the bit-interfaces on graphics cards- how do they relate to this new
standard- would they have to be upgraded before the new interface could be utilized completely? Also since onboard GPUs are ON the mobo how does their speed with the CPU relate vs a discrete card.
 

alidan

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[citation][nom]iamtheking123[/nom]I think you're confused. The reason you don't see faster video cards isn't because they max out the x16 slot. In fact, most cards won't even max the x8 slots.[/citation]

there was an article here a while ago, and it did 4x 8x and 16x by used of tapeing off cards. and if i remember right the difference between 4x and 16x was between 8 and 12% instead of the 75%+ you would expect if the bandwidth was actually used.
 

soccerdocks

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I'm glad that they're updating so early. Its WAY better to update the standards before bandwidth limits are reached rather than wait for them to be reached and to slow things down. It took too long for USB 3.0 to come out, so its good that PCIe 3.0 before its needed mainstream.
 
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