Question PCIe questions

Dec 31, 2020
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Hey all, so I was torn whether this is a GPU question or a PSU, but since it stems from trying to install a new graphics card I put it here. Sorry if this is an obvious question but I know very little about all this, and have been learning as I go.

I have a Thermaltake Smart 600W PSU, and the card I just bought is an RX580. The card has an 8-pin PCIe connection on it, and it came with an adapter to make it into two 6-pins, but my computer has a dual 4-pin coming off it, with one of the 4s being plugged into the motherboard.

Does this mean I have an insufficient PSU to use this card? I see that I could buy a 4-pin to 8-pin cord, bypassing the adapter that came with the card, but would that be functional?

Also, I see that there are dual 4-pin to 8-pin cords available. Does that mean I should use both my 4-pins, the loose one and the one I'd have to unplug from the motherboard? I can't imagine that's right, but I really don't know how this works.

I will upgrade my PSU if I have to, but from what I'd read before I bought the card, I thought my PSU was sufficient--the card's manufacturer suggests 500W, mine is 600W, and I've read a few reviews indicating that my PSU is not one of the best but not one of the worst either, which just leaves me ambivalent.

Basically, am I in the market for a new PCIe cord, or a new PSU? Or should I just give up on using this particular graphics card altogether?

Any and all help is much appreciated, thanks.
 
Hey all, so I was torn whether this is a GPU question or a PSU, but since it stems from trying to install a new graphics card I put it here. Sorry if this is an obvious question but I know very little about all this, and have been learning as I go.

I have a Thermaltake Smart 600W PSU, and the card I just bought is an RX580. The xard has a 8-pin PCIe connection on it, and it came with an adapter to make it into two 6-pins, but my computer has a dual 4-pin coming off it, with one of the 4s being plugged into the motherboard.

Does this mean I have an insufficient PSU to use this card? I see that I could buy a 4-pin to 8-pin cord, bypassing the adapter that came with the card, but would that be functional?

Also, I see that there are dual 4-pin to 8-pin cords available. Does that mean I should use both my 4-pins, the loose one and the one I'd have to unplug from the motherboard? I can't imagine that's right, but I really don't know how this works.

I will upgrade my PSU if I have to, but from what I'd read before I bought the card, I thought my PSU was sufficient--the card suggests 500W, mine is 600W, and I've read a few reviews indicating that my PSU is not one of the best but not one of the worst either, which just leaves me ambivalent.

Basically, am I in the market for a new PCIe cord, or a new PSU? Or should I just give up on using this particular graphics card altogether?

Any and all help is much appreciated, thanks.
First, you can't use that 2x4 pin for GPU, that's for MB CPU connector, wouldn't fit anyway.
Yes, you are in the market for PSU, any PSU that doesn't have at least one 6+2 connector for GPU is not worth it because it's either too old or too low powered. Besides, those low tier PSUs rarely have as much power they claim to, some as little as half.
 
Dec 31, 2020
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First, you can't use that 2x4 pin for GPU, that's for MB CPU connector, wouldn't fit anyway.
Yes, you are in the market for PSU, any PSU that doesn't have at least one 6+2 connector for GPU is not worth it because it's either too old or too low powered. Besides, those low tier PSUs rarely have as much power they claim to, some as little as half.
Great, that's just what I needed to know, thanks. If you or anyone has a suggestion for a sufficient PSU that won't break the bank, I'd appreciate that, too.
 
Great, that's just what I needed to know, thanks. If you or anyone has a suggestion for a sufficient PSU that won't break the bank, I'd appreciate that, too.
Here https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/psu-tier-list-psucultists.3624094/ you have a list and comparison by make and model but also depends on what you can put your mitts on, price and rest of the system. Some middle of the rad like better EVGA models seem to be best buy nowadays. I wouldn't go for anything bellow 650-750W.
 
Dec 31, 2020
5
0
10
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Here https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/psu-tier-list-psucultists.3624094/ you have a list and comparison by make and model but also depends on what you can put your mitts on, price and rest of the system. Some middle of the rad like better EVGA models seem to be best buy nowadays. I wouldn't go for anything bellow 650-750W.
So after some deliberation, I'm thinking of this model:

Corsair CX Series Modular CX750M 750W 80+ Bronze ATX.

Is this a good choice?

From what I gather, Corsair sounds like a good brand, 750W seems like plenty of power, and, from the images of the product, it looks like it has two 8-pin and four 6-pin connections. 8-pin is just as good as 6+2, is it not? I just want to make sure I'm not misunderstanding things and making some big mistake.

One other thing: you can tell by my questions that I'm not totally confident in my abilities here. I would have had no problem installing the graphics card myself on its own, but I am concerned about safely installing a PSU. If my hardware experience is limited to changing graphics cards, is a PSU installation worth paying an extra $40 to have done by a pro at Best Buy? I'm good at following directions and I can build a ship in a bottle, but I really don't want to fry my machine, nor myself.
 
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So after some deliberation, I'm thinking of this model:

Corsair CX Series Modular CX750M 750W 80+ Bronze ATX.

Is this a good choice?

From what I gather, Corsair sounds like a good brand, 750W seems like plenty of power, and, from the images of the product, it looks like it has two 8-pin and four 6-pin connections. 8-pin is just as good as 6+2, is it not? I just want to make sure I'm not misunderstanding things and making some big mistake.

One other thing: you can tell by my questions that I'm not totally confident in my abilities here. I would have had no problem installing the graphics card myself on its own, but I am concerned about safely installing a PSU. If my hardware experience is limited to changing graphics cards, is a PSU installation worth paying an extra $40 to have done by a pro at Best Buy? I'm good at following directions and I can build a ship in a bottle, but I really don't want to fry my machine, nor myself.
Yes, good PSU. Don't worry about installing it, all leads are keyed so they can go just in proper place and right way. Just need manual for your MB and GPU.
 

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