[SOLVED] PCIe Version vs. Operating System

ktriebol

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Feb 22, 2013
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I was thinking about building a new system, and one of the questions that came to mind, is that if I want to have PCIe 4.0, is it necessary for the operating system to be capable of running PCIe 4.0, or doesn't that have anything to do with the operating system?
 

geofelt

Titan
Some thoughts:
What is of interest to you with windows 11?
The benefit as I see it comes from the better scheduler for alder lake big/little cores.
Windows 11 is bound to have some bugs, I would delay if I could.

I think you can probably run windows 11, but with some of the new security changes disabled.

Going off support does not mean that your pc will stop running.
It just means that new features for windows 10 will not be available past 2025.
You should still be getting security updates.

Pcie x2/3/4 made little difference for graphics card performance.

For performance, you do want a ssd. But, do not be too much impressed with the synthetic benchmarks that come with pcie 4.
In actuality, once you have a ssd, ANY ssd, you will hardly notice any difference.
If you have the budget, of course, but otherwise:

An amusing video:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4DKLA7w9eeA
 

USAFRet

Titan
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Mar 16, 2013
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I was thinking about building a new system, and one of the questions that came to mind, is that if I want to have PCIe 4.0, is it necessary for the operating system to be capable of running PCIe 4.0, or doesn't that have anything to do with the operating system?
Partially associated, but not directly related to PCIe 4.0.

What OS are you going to use? Anything pre Win 10 likely will not run, or only after a LOT of work.
 

ktriebol

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Feb 22, 2013
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Partially associated, but not directly related to PCIe 4.0.

What OS are you going to use? Anything pre Win 10 likely will not run, or only after a LOT of work.
Since I was somewhat disappointed that I can't upgrade my Desktop Intel 7th gen CPU to Windows 11, I thought I would go with Linux Mint 20.2. I tried Mint recently on my laptop and found that it met my needs and I was able to adapt to it quite easily. I can't find any detailed specs on Linux Mint 20.2 that indicates support for any particular version of PCIe, though. I guess this isn't an urgent matter, because I will probably just run Windows 10 on my current desktop for a while longer since it will be supported until 2025. Anyway, I do think PCIe 4.0 or 5.0 along with USB4 are key features to have in the new build.
 

geofelt

Titan
Some thoughts:
What is of interest to you with windows 11?
The benefit as I see it comes from the better scheduler for alder lake big/little cores.
Windows 11 is bound to have some bugs, I would delay if I could.

I think you can probably run windows 11, but with some of the new security changes disabled.

Going off support does not mean that your pc will stop running.
It just means that new features for windows 10 will not be available past 2025.
You should still be getting security updates.

Pcie x2/3/4 made little difference for graphics card performance.

For performance, you do want a ssd. But, do not be too much impressed with the synthetic benchmarks that come with pcie 4.
In actuality, once you have a ssd, ANY ssd, you will hardly notice any difference.
If you have the budget, of course, but otherwise:

An amusing video:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4DKLA7w9eeA
 

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