Discussion PC's on resale markets (i.e. Facebook Market Place)

tsdobbi

Commendable
Oct 29, 2016
10
0
1,510
0
So my wife wanted to get into gaming with me. Being legitimately skeptical as to how long this interest would last, I didn't want to spend 7-800 bucks on a new build, mid range system. So I was looking to see what I could snag used on craigslist/fb market for no more than 350 bucks ( was thinking maybe an IvyBridge proc with something comparable to a higher end GTX 7 series), I parted out what I could buy the individual parts for, used/refurbished and that price seems pretty fair, if not generous for a system like that.Don't get me wrong I've found a few people selling their old rigs for what they are actually worth,mostly newer systems, which isnt what I am looking for.

For every ONE seller offering a fair deal, there are 20 who way over price their systems. People selling a decade old computer for 600 bucks(or more) with a disclaimer not to "low ball them". I've basically just decided Im going to buy used/refurbished parts and build a system. My main point of discussion I guess is the motivation of these sellers. Are they oblivious to the actual value of these rigs? Or are they trying to scam people that have no clue about the actual value of the hardware and just see "it plays fortnite/league of legends" on the description?
 

Gam3r01

Titan
Moderator
They refuse to believe their hardware isnt worth what they paid for it.
The hard truth is PC components lose value fast. After a few years a budget entry level system can outperform most mainstream hardware of years prior, but nobody want to admit that.

So, they will list it for higher than they should, and sometimes people pay for it.
Most of the time, it dosent sell.
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
I think there's a combination of
  • lack of knowledge
  • Expectation that things hold their value (I paid $1,000 for this X years again, it must be worth $800)
  • Trying to take advantage - I wouldn't say scam, as the responsibility ultimately sits with the buyer to understand what they're buying.
I buy/sell/flip systems all the time - because there's room in the market due with people wants reasonably priced systems without paying the ridiculous asking prices of a lot of people.
If you have the time or desire (or need) to hunt for deals, you can put together a solid system for very little money -- assuming you have a local market with a decent supply of parts.

As an example, my most recent was an i5-2500K, Z68 board, 8GB and a GTX 970. That was inside a new case, with a new cooler & new fans.
For the base components I paid about $170 Canadian, dropped maybe another $170 into it with the case, fans, cooler & SSD and flipped it for $450. I think everybody got a fair deal out of it.
 

tsdobbi

Commendable
Oct 29, 2016
10
0
1,510
0
For the base components I paid about $170 Canadian, dropped maybe another $170 into it with the case, fans, cooler & SSD and flipped it for $450. I think everybody got a fair deal out of it.
Completely agree. Im seeing quite a bit of first gen core PC's (i7 920's/960's) out there in the 6-700 dollar range...its like...come on. I have an i7 920 PC (with a * video card I used it as a media PC in the basement of my last house when I built my current rig) collecting dust in my garage. I never even considered trying to pawn it off to some rube on craigslist for 600 bucks. If I sold it I would probably sell it for 100 bucks max, if that.
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
Ultimately, something is only "worth" what someone is prepared to pay for it.
Unfortunately, if that means somebody who doesn't know better is prepared to pay that (or close), then that's what it's "worth".

I totally agree though, some of the stuff out there is being listed at crazy prices - I just hope that stuff isn't moving at those prices.

Sometimes I drop offers on stuff, with a quick rationale (similar systems are selling for X, on eBay you can buy that part for Y, newer, better stuff new is Z). Usually ending with "if you reevaluate and want to move it, I'd be prepared to pay X which I feel is a fair price, otherwise, good luck with your sale".
I've found maybe about 30% of people just have no clue what something is worth and appreciate the insight - most though, will tell you to do one.
 

tsdobbi

Commendable
Oct 29, 2016
10
0
1,510
0
Ultimately, something is only "worth" what someone is prepared to pay for it.
Unfortunately, if that means somebody who doesn't know better is prepared to pay that (or close), then that's what it's "worth".

I totally agree though, some of the stuff out there is being listed at crazy prices - I just hope that stuff isn't moving at those prices.

Sometimes I drop offers on stuff, with a quick rationale (similar systems are selling for X, on eBay you can buy that part for Y, newer, better stuff new is Z). Usually ending with "if you reevaluate and want to move it, I'd be prepared to pay X which I feel is a fair price, otherwise, good luck with your sale".
I've found maybe about 30% of people just have no clue what something is worth and appreciate the insight - most though, will tell you to do one.
I've thrown out an offer on an overpriced system even wasting the time to list the price of the parts on the resale market to the seller and offered an additional 50 dollars on top of that cost since its assembled and Im met with radio silence. They have got to be waiting for that unicorn that's gonna overpay because they dont know any better.

I just really don't know how to feel about it. I'm not a dick and would never just try to take advantage of someones ignorance for my own gain.
 
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Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
I just really don't know how to feel about it. I'm not a dick and would never just try to take advantage of someones ignorance for my own gain.
Don't get me wrong, I list higher - simply because I know I'll be talked down. Not a huge markup, but for that $450 system I sold, I think I had it listed at $550
If someone wants to offer me the full price, then that's on them. However, I tend to get a 'feel' for the person when we meet to exchange.

One time, I was flipping a system and this pretty young kid showed up with his mom.... maybe 12 or so, not sure. Didn't get the vibe it was a kid when arranging the deal, but man they were so happy to be getting a "gaming PC" that was within their budget & hadn't even considered haggling.
I don't remember the prices specifically, but I would've taken $50 less than they agreed to. In the end, deal was done, cash in hand & I handed him back $50, telling him to put it towards some nice peripherals or whatever. I got my bit of profit out of it, and man was that kid happy.

For the most part, if it had been an adult, I wouldn't have done that. To me, they should know how to play the "game", and if they don't haggle that's on them. My listings will always have "OBO" as, even if you're pricing fair and 'firm', I kind of like the negotiation side of things.
I don't know if that's a double standard or not.... probably is, but oh well.
 
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