Pimax Developing Advanced Accessories For Upcoming 8K VR HMD

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That is not 8K. Referring to two 4K screens as "8K" could be considered false advertising. Added together, that's only half of 8K resolution. It would be the same as calling two 1080p screens "4K". If the vertical resolution doesn't matter, we might as well refer to the 60 pixel high touch bar on a Macbook Pro as a "2K" display.

Maybe the headset will turn out great. Its resolution is not "8K" by any standardized definition though. Call it what it really is, a Dual 4K VR headset. If the product is any good, they shouldn't need questionable hardware specs to sell it.
 

Jim90

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Yup, this isn't 8K...each eye gets 4K to allow for two slightly offset images to enable depth perception, though still at 4K total. Add in motion tracking and an HMD for 3D immersion.
 
They can make 4K VR but we don't have affordable hardware to run it. We need faster video cards for HIGH resolution VR.

GTX 1080 Ti can do 4K but I'm fairly certain it would struggle with 4K VR. Currently I don't even know how they would test their "8k VR" (LOL). Dual Titan XPs? i9 7980XE?

Also, I would not want to look at 60Hz right in front of my eyes. In the old days of CRT monitors you could see 60Hz flicker when you looked at it out of the corner of your eye. I know the screen type isn't the same but it's still the same speed refresh rate which, if you ask me would seem to low to use in VR.
 

8K is equivalent to four 4K screens, or sixteen 1080p screens. Not only double the width of 4K, but also double the height.


Well, they did mention plans to offer an eye tracking accessory here. Eye tracking should offer the possibility of making use of foveated rendering, which renders what the viewer is looking at in full resolution and quality levels, but anything in the periphery, where your eyes don't see details as well, can be rendered at a much lower quality, and the two images can be softly combined together. This can enable sharper resolution without greatly increasing performance demands. Of course, this headset still has over six times the pixels of a current-generation Rift or Vive, and even at 60Hz, you're looking at filling over four times the pixels per second. Foveated rendering could potentially help a lot, but you'd still likely be looking at needing around double the GPU performance of those current headsets.

It's also possible that Foveated rendering might need to be support natively by games for best results, and as far as I know, no current games support it due to the lack of eye tracking hardware in today's VR headsets. It's possible that some universal method could be implemented in graphics card drivers, but I doubt AMD or Nvidia would implement something like that until the major players release headsets with such hardware.
 

Jim90

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KESIS85: lol what? 2x 4k = 8 x fhd = 8k

Erm...nope! You need to realise that EACH EYE in the HMD headset only gets 4k. This is entirely different from a true 8K screen in non-HMD view, where each eye does get 8K. Hint: close one eye in an 8K desktop monitor: what resolution is the open eye getting? Do the same in the above VR headset...what res is the open eye getting?

What a VR headset offers is 1. depth of field (stereoscopic image) and 2. motion tracking potential. Combine both to give immersive 3D potential. Simply increase resolution and tracking responsiveness to increase realism further (future goal).
 
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