Ping randomly shoots up causing lag spikes in games.

Jan 23, 2019
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Ever since switching to a wireless card/adapter for my motherboard (ASUS PCE-AC68) instead of a wired adaptor I've been getting seemingly random ping spikes. these are usually only noticeable in games (Mostly Overwatch) by rubber banding.
When I ping my router I've gotten consistent ping response times (<1ms). However, when I have pinged google.com or my isp I've gotten seemingly random ping spikes. Thank you in advance to anyone who can help out :)

ISP:
Ping statistics for 75.75.75.75:
Packets: Sent = 50, Received = 50, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 16ms, Maximum = 164ms, Average = 28ms
GOOGLE:
Ping statistics for 216.58.192.142:
Packets: Sent = 50, Received = 50, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 18ms, Maximum = 134ms, Average = 29ms
 
When the spikes are random you have to collect data over a long period of time to be really sure where the problem is.

Everything past your router appears to the internet as your routers wan port. That is the main function of a router. The internet can not know if you are connected via wifi or ethernet. All traffic is functioning as though the router itself is the computer. There should be no difference between using ethernet or wifi.

You need to do more careful testing what you say is happening would have to be a bug in the router firmware which is highly unlikely.

I strongly suspect you have more common generic wifi problems and you testing has just not showed the problem.

The way wifi does error correction and the way games sync location between your client and server make the worst possible combination you can get. The random lag in games is a extremely common issue which is why it is recommended to never play online games on wifi.
 
Jan 23, 2019
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I’ve also noticed that when I turn off the auto network config the spikes disappear. I think this is more a problem with my network card but I’m not positive.
 

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