Question Ping Spikes in Ethernet but not in ISP deafult Gateway

Oct 15, 2020
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Hi,
The problem is i am getting lot of ping spikes and jitter and packetloss in wired connection to my laptop but when i connect through wifi its good and even the ISP deafult gateway shows no ping spikes and packetloss.
i have attached a ping plotter test showing problem.
Please suggest any solution.

Thank you.
 
That is very strange. It can't actually work that way unless the router has some very strange bug.

The way traffic goes is going to be LAN---router chip---wan----isp

Both the wifi chips and the ethernet chips are on the same lan. They pass through the same connection to the router and out to the internet. By the time the traffic gets to the wan port it all appears as if it comes from a single machine (that is main purpose of a consumer router).

So I can't see how the ISP link could even know that the traffic was ethernet and drop it.

If the problem was actually on the ethernet you would see packet loss to hop 1. Packet delays on ethernet are not actually possible it would be some bug or issue with the reporting tool. The ethernet cable itself always transmit data at some fixed percentage of the speed of light. When the data gets to the far end it is either discarded because of errors or accepted. Unlike wifi there is not data retransmission at the hardware level. The only way you see a delay would be if the router was actually so overloaded it could not respond of if the pc actually got the response but did process it.

In any case you would see issues in hop1. When you see no issues in hop1 but issues in hop 2 by that time the data be converted to the router wan so it can not really be affected by the lan.

Maybe some issue with the testing tool. I would try the same thing using simple ping commands and see if you get similar results. Actual problems with ethernet will show problem to hop 1.
 
Oct 15, 2020
8
0
10
0
That is very strange. It can't actually work that way unless the router has some very strange bug.

The way traffic goes is going to be LAN---router chip---wan----isp

Both the wifi chips and the ethernet chips are on the same lan. They pass through the same connection to the router and out to the internet. By the time the traffic gets to the wan port it all appears as if it comes from a single machine (that is main purpose of a consumer router).

So I can't see how the ISP link could even know that the traffic was ethernet and drop it.

If the problem was actually on the ethernet you would see packet loss to hop 1. Packet delays on ethernet are not actually possible it would be some bug or issue with the reporting tool. The ethernet cable itself always transmit data at some fixed percentage of the speed of light. When the data gets to the far end it is either discarded because of errors or accepted. Unlike wifi there is not data retransmission at the hardware level. The only way you see a delay would be if the router was actually so overloaded it could not respond of if the pc actually got the response but did process it.

In any case you would see issues in hop1. When you see no issues in hop1 but issues in hop 2 by that time the data be converted to the router wan so it can not really be affected by the lan.

Maybe some issue with the testing tool. I would try the same thing using simple ping commands and see if you get similar results. Actual problems with ethernet will show problem to hop 1.
Could you suggest any tool to check packetloss correctly?
 
Oct 15, 2020
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packetlosstest.com. I would run it both wired and wireless and see what you get. I bet they are the same but since wireless is designed for losses and is slower, you don't 'feel' it as much.
I am getting 8.1 % on wifi and 13.4% on lan packet loss testing on packetlosstest.com
 
Glad you got it fixed but it makes no sense at all. All dns does is translate the URL to a IP. Although different DNS can get different IP addresses because of load balancing stuff the path the IP take is the same. There is only 1 path no matter what IP you talk to. They all must go over the same ISP connection. I could see if you got different pings farther into the network where there are different paths but in this case they all share the same connection. If you happen to figure it out please update this.
 
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