Question Ping spikes/ Packetloss issue

Jan 29, 2019
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This issue has been going on for months. As of recently my issues has been worse and worse. I'm getting extremely severe and sporadic ping spikes and packetloss. (Upwards of 10k ping and 90+% packetloss) I've exhausted practically all things i can think of. ' Senior techs" of my isp have come out and they have no idea. I've tried doing the following

Moved houses - Close to old house.

Bought a brand new pc - Upgraded anyway

Reset modem

Uninstalled and Reinstalled drivers

Updated Drivers

Used command prompt to;

Reset IP, Renew, Release, Flushed DNS

Replaced all cables, and media switch, Tried on 3 separate pcs.

Changed to optimal Wifi 5ghz channel.

Changed the wires to my modem/router

Tried wireless card advanced options

Disabled power saving for wireless card

Enabled high performance on PC

Reset Winsock

Disabled windows updates

Even uninstalled my antivirus temporarily to test...

Let me mention that all the above mentioned I also tested using a wired connection via Ethernet to make sure it wasnt my Wireless Adapter. I also Used different Ethernet cables to test the exact same way and nothing worked...

Spikes can be anywhere from minutes to hours apart.

PC Specs
i7 8700k
16GB DDR4
GTX 2060 6GB
Meg z390 ace MOBO
Using 64 Windows 10

I do have a few screenshots of CMD ping tests as well as pingplotter
 
Pingplotter might show you the hop location if you get lucky and it happens while you are testing.

If you can run a constant ping to your router and it is does not happen the problem is likely outside your house.

You want to ping hops farther into the trace and find the lowest hop that gets these random spikes. Hop2 tends to be the most common since that is the link to your house and also the one the ISP can fix the easiest.

Make sure you test on ethernet. What you need is a constant ping to both your router and the node that causes the problem. This is so the ISP can not try to blame your equipment.
 
Jan 29, 2019
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Pingplotter might show you the hop location if you get lucky and it happens while you are testing.

If you can run a constant ping to your router and it is does not happen the problem is likely outside your house.

You want to ping hops farther into the trace and find the lowest hop that gets these random spikes. Hop2 tends to be the most common since that is the link to your house and also the one the ISP can fix the easiest.

Make sure you test on ethernet. What you need is a constant ping to both your router and the node that causes the problem. This is so the ISP can not try to blame your equipment.
http://prntscr.com/ppefuc
Managed to get it. ran it for less then half an hour.
Yet cmd to router showed nothing.

This was with an Ethernet connection. I was the only one on the network during.
 
This is very strange you show all kinds of loss in the middle hops but none to the final node and no jitter really either.

I would try to disable IPv6 in your nic and see what happens. IPv4 and ipv6 traffic takes different paths and your game likely is using ipv4 but that is hard to say for sure.

You really don't need ipv6 support for most things. This is just a guess but it does not hurt to try I suppose.
 
Jan 29, 2019
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This is very strange you show all kinds of loss in the middle hops but none to the final node and no jitter really either.

I would try to disable IPv6 in your nic and see what happens. IPv4 and ipv6 traffic takes different paths and your game likely is using ipv4 but that is hard to say for sure.

You really don't need ipv6 support for most things. This is just a guess but it does not hurt to try I suppose.
Tried disabling ipv6, still had the issue. then 4 and still the issue. They said they checked the box outside and everything was fine, but could it be the location of where i live? Too many people in a radius bottlenecking the connection?
 
I would run the path ping again with ipv6 disabled and see if the results are different.

You need one that shows loss or delay to the final node. If you see no loss of delay to the final node the intermediate loss/delay has to be a lie. This would be as if the tv reported the traffic delay to companies you pass on the way to work. You can't actually get to your work without taking those delays on the path.

Routers in the path can drop ping requests if they are busy passing data.

It also could be you were unlucky and the problem was hiding when it tested the last node especially if your problem is intermittent.

Too many people sharing the connection generally cause large ping times first and then loss. The router tries to hold the data in buffers. Your current tests show no delays at all.
 
Jan 29, 2019
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disabled ipv6 and not showing packetloss through pingplotter, though still experiencing the disconnects and ping spikes ingames, youtube and twitch. ect... are still freezing and discord won't pick up voice during those periods.
 
If the loss is very intermittent you are going to have to run your own pingplotter that runs constantly.

Run tracert to some ip address like 8.8.8.8

Now open a bunch of cmd windows and run constant ping to each hop in the trace. Realistically you only need to do hop 1 (your router) hop2 (the ISP router) and the end ip. You can add other hops if you find nothing. The only easy hop to get fixed is hop 2. The ISP will correctly claim if the problem is say in hop 7 and that is owned by google that they can not fix it and you of course will never get google to do anything.
 

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