Question Platform switch from x299 to z490

sodium.in.toilet

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Is it worth spending alittle more money to get a 10700k and z490 motherboard instead of getting a 7900x? I already have the x299 motherboard.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Depends on what you run. For games or applications that primarily benefit from strong single core performance or fewer than 8 cores, then the 10700k is the stronger option.

If instead you run applications or games that are WELL optimized for threaded performance, or you do a lot of HEAVY multitasking where more than 8 cores (16 threads total) are beneficial, which honestly is probably few scenarios where ten cores is going to offer a significant benefit versus "only" 8, then the 7900x is technically a winner.

The fact that you can run the 10700k on much less substantial cooling might be a consideration as well. I think it would probably come down to, for me, whether you can get the 7900x for less than you can get a decent Z490 board and CPU, and I doubt that you can do that unless you have resources that most don't have. A brand new 10th gen CPU and motherboard are much cheaper than what I see the 7900x going for.
 

sodium.in.toilet

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Depends on what you run. For games or applications that primarily benefit from strong single core performance or fewer than 8 cores, then the 10700k is the stronger option.

If instead you run applications or games that are WELL optimized for threaded performance, or you do a lot of HEAVY multitasking where more than 8 cores (16 threads total) are beneficial, which honestly is probably few scenarios where ten cores is going to offer a significant benefit versus "only" 8, then the 7900x is technically a winner.

The fact that you can run the 10700k on much less substantial cooling might be a consideration as well. I think it would probably come down to, for me, whether you can get the 7900x for less than you can get a decent Z490 board and CPU, and I doubt that you can do that unless you have resources that most don't have. A brand new 10th gen CPU and motherboard are much cheaper than what I see the 7900x going for.
I forgot to mention I have the cooling and everything I need. Also playing games none of the desktop stuff. If I get the 10700k I would get it new and if I got the 7900x I would get it used. I just got a refurbished 7640x from my rma and my motherboard is still in the return window. I also have the option to go amd. Somebody said I should go with the 5800x, but that compares to the 10900k right? What would be the AMD equivalent of the 10700k?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
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sodium.in.toilet

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For gaming only, the 10700k is clearly the better choice. There are few if any games that use more than 16 threads, and 8 stronger cores are going to be more beneficial in gaming than 10 significantly weaker ones. By significantly weaker, I mean to the tune of about a 15% stronger per core performance on the 10700k.

https://www.cpubenchmark.net/compare/Intel-i7-10700K-vs-Intel-i9-7900X/3733vs3035
The 7900x does about the same fps as the 9900k. Does that mean the 10700k outperforms the 9900k?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
The 10700k is the exact same CPU as the 9900k, except it has been configured with a 100mhz faster peak boost clock, it NATIVELY supports 2933mhz RAM rather than 2666mhz RAM on the 9900k (But both support faster XMP or manually configured memory speeds) and uses a different socket LGA 1200 instead of LGA 1151. Other than that they are pretty much identical. Both have the same cache, same onboard graphics, support the same number of memory channels, and so on.

Given the same price I'd choose the 10700k. If the 9900k was moderately less expensive I'd choose it. In reality, I'd choose neither, because AMD has better options right now that perform better in both applications and gaming as well as heavy multitasking and single core performance, are less expensive, have a lower thermal design power which means they are less difficult to cool and are an overall better choice IF you can get one.

But truthfully, whatever you can get right now for the better price is probably just fine.
 
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sodium.in.toilet

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The 10700k is the exact same CPU as the 9900k, except it has been configured with a 100mhz faster peak boost clock, it NATIVELY supports 2933mhz RAM rather than 2666mhz RAM on the 9900k (But both support faster XMP or manually configured memory speeds) and uses a different socket LGA 1200 instead of LGA 1151. Other than that they are pretty much identical. Both have the same cache, same onboard graphics, support the same number of memory channels, and so on.

Given the same price I'd choose the 10700k. If the 9900k was moderately less expensive I'd choose it. In reality, I'd choose neither, because AMD has better options right now that perform better in both applications and gaming as well as heavy multitasking and single core performance, are less expensive, have a lower thermal design power which means they are less difficult to cool and are an overall better choice IF you can get one.

But truthfully, whatever you can get right now for the better price is probably just fine.
Is it a bad time to buy a cpu? How much should I pay for a 5800x? If the 9900k and 10700k are basically the same then why does the 10700k do so much better than the 7900x?
 
The 7900X can't hit sustained all core 4.8 GHz turbo on all 10 cores, where the 10900K can....; running it as intended from the box with no BIOS trickery, it was supposed to run only 4.3 GHz on even a single core, and, surely would step down to 3.9 GHz or less under an all core load... (I believe I read the 7900X could hit perhaps 4.5 GHz under overclocking with great cooling and those who don't mind it's 200 watt power draw under max load...
 
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nofanneeded

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Is it a bad time to buy a cpu? How much should I pay for a 5800x? If the 9900k and 10700k are basically the same then why does the 10700k do so much better than the 7900x?
If you are not gaming much it is pointless to get 5800x over 3900xt

3900xt has 12 cores and almost the same price

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1570790-REG/amd_100_100000277wof_ryzen_9_3900xt_3_8.html

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1598376-REG/amd_100_100000063wof_ryzen_7_5800x_3_8.html
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
I was talking about 4th Gen Ryzen Desktop parts. Ryzen 5000 series CPUs. But they are not currently available anywhere. Totally sold old except through 3rd party scalpers.

Intel parts would seem to be the best immediate option, but if you can wait a while, meaning, like into January at some point, that will probably change. CPU shortages are always common this time of the year, even when there hasn't just been a new launch of very successful sought after parts, which there has. I'd either go with 10th Gen Intel now, or wait for the Ryzen 5000 series parts to become available.
 
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sodium.in.toilet

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I was talking about 4th Gen Ryzen Desktop parts. Ryzen 5000 series CPUs. But they are not currently available anywhere. Totally sold old except through 3rd party scalpers.

Intel parts would seem to be the best immediate option, but if you can wait a while, meaning, like into January at some point, that will probably change. CPU shortages are always common this time of the year, even when there hasn't just been a new launch of very successful sought after parts, which there has. I'd either go with 10th Gen Intel now, or wait for the Ryzen 5000 series parts to become available.
I didn't know they just came out. It probably makes sense that the 5800x is so much more expensive than the 10700k now. I just thought that was normal price.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Not even close really. The 3800x, for example, has generally sold for about anywhere from 330-360.00, and that SHOULD be about where the 5800x slots in at for the latest generation, but availability, being new and there being currently a very high demand, for just about anything anybody can get their hands on, has dramatically affected just about everything on the market.

Power supplies are similar, but for a slightly different reason. Those ALL come from China, and China shut down pretty much ALL manufacturing for about three or four months earlier this year because, obviously, of Covid. Plus, they didn't just stop manufacturing, they stopped shipping what was already manufactured. So no product from China for months. Demand didn't stop, but supply did. And so even now when they've restored manufacturing and shipping for several months already the market demand is still miles behind, and power supplies are currently about 40% more expensive than normal, across the board, and about 60% higher than normal for models in high demand.

So a unit that might have sold for around 100 bucks in the middle of 2019 is likely selling for around 160 bucks now. Units that were 140 bucks are often now over 200 dollars. Tariffs that were applied in late 2019 aren't helping the situation any either.

CPUs are different, because those are not coming from China, but they are still a product that is highly susceptible to variations in manufacturing and in the market, and since Covid has been a factor EVERYWHERE when it comes to actual physical bodies being on the job, and warehousing, and shipping, and packaging, and at the fabs that make the raw product as well, it's all just a big fat mess right now.

Nvidia graphics cards for example are a hot mess because they can't get enough 8nm yields from Samsung and there are GDDR DRAM shortages as well because those products are all being sourced for OTHER companies in addition to Nvidia, for other high demand products.

For the Ryzen CPUs, I don't know SPECIFICALLY what the problem is aside from demand, but clearly something is going on and I suspect it's mainly just a lack of the fab being able to dedicate enough time to THIS specific customer because they have many other customers also waiting on many other products, all at the same time, in a year where everything has gone wrong. A perfect storm so to speak.

But this isn't a first. We saw similar problems in December of 2018, 2016, probably other years as well where there were new releases from Intel and products couldn't be obtained until sometime during the next quarter of the next year. When you add holiday shopping and a lot of people being stuck at home who want to be able to handle the latest PC games on top of it, well, stuff happens.
 
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sodium.in.toilet

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Nov 21, 2018
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Not even close really. The 3800x, for example, has generally sold for about anywhere from 330-360.00, and that SHOULD be about where the 5800x slots in at for the latest generation, but availability, being new and there being currently a very high demand, for just about anything anybody can get their hands on, has dramatically affected just about everything on the market.

Power supplies are similar, but for a slightly different reason. Those ALL come from China, and China shut down pretty much ALL manufacturing for about three or four months earlier this year because, obviously, of Covid. Plus, they didn't just stop manufacturing, they stopped shipping what was already manufactured. So no product from China for months. Demand didn't stop, but supply did. And so even now when they've restored manufacturing and shipping for several months already the market demand is still miles behind, and power supplies are currently about 40% more expensive than normal, across the board, and about 60% higher than normal for models in high demand.

So a unit that might have sold for around 100 bucks in the middle of 2019 is likely selling for around 160 bucks now. Units that were 140 bucks are often now over 200 dollars. Tariffs that were applied in late 2019 aren't helping the situation any either.

CPUs are different, because those are not coming from China, but they are still a product that is highly susceptible to variations in manufacturing and in the market, and since Covid has been a factor EVERYWHERE when it comes to actual physical bodies being on the job, and warehousing, and shipping, and packaging, and at the fabs that make the raw product as well, it's all just a big fat mess right now.

Nvidia graphics cards for example are a hot mess because they can't get enough 8nm yields from Samsung and there are GDDR DRAM shortages as well because those products are all being sourced for OTHER companies in addition to Nvidia, for other high demand products.

For the Ryzen CPUs, I don't know SPECIFICALLY what the problem is aside from demand, but clearly something is going on and I suspect it's mainly just a lack of the fab being able to dedicate enough time to THIS specific customer because they have many other customers also waiting on many other products, all at the same time, in a year where everything has gone wrong. A perfect storm so to speak.

But this isn't a first. We saw similar problems in December of 2018, 2016, probably other years as well where there were new releases from Intel and products couldn't be obtained until sometime during the next quarter of the next year. When you add holiday shopping and a lot of people being stuck at home who want to be able to handle the latest PC games on top of it, well, stuff happens.
I too would like to waste money on my computer because I'm bored. Not that my life has changed at all due to covid, but I think all the lockdown stuff is hurting more than its helping. I wish all of the marketing and advertisements would've hit me last year instead of this year. I kind of lost interest in spending all my money on my pc, so much that I didnt even know the 2000 cards existed until just recently. which is probably a good thing because price/performance is much better on the 3000 cards, that is if we even get them.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Yes, right now the really sweet spot, if you wanted to get the best performance for the least amount of money (Well, not RIGHT now, but it WOULD be RIGHT now if things were selling for anything near MSRP) would be something like a Ryzen 5600x with an RTX 3060 ti, unless you were shooting for high FPS 4k gaming, and then you'd probably want a 3080 or 3090 depending on exactly what kind of display configuration you were trying to push and how greedy you were in terms of quality settings.

An RTX 3060 ti and a Ryzen 5600x would be reasonably more powerful than 99% of what has historically been available in the past ten years, for about 50% less than what some of those "ultimate future proof" (That weren't, clearly.) systems were selling for during their peak heyday. Yes, I'm being somewhat loose with some of those numbers, but you get the idea.

Unfortunately, I just don't have any OTHER good answers for you. You either pay too much for something if you have to have it now, AND take the risk of buying through what can only be called scalpers, or you wait. Or, you go with Intel. Or, you buy a Ryzen 3000 series product like the 3700x, 3900x or 3950x, if you can find those at a reasonable price, because they are generally less expensive than current Gen Intel parts but are only slightly less capable than those same Intel parts. The advantage of the latest Ryzen 5000 series parts is that they are MORE capable than existing Intel parts, for MOST workloads and games.
 
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