Question Pls help cant change boot files

Apr 23, 2018
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So i just noticed that the 500mt part of my windows is on another drive so i tried to change it but it does not work.
My windows language is Finnish so this may be problem.

It just says:
failure when attempting to copy boot files.

I wrote this: bcdboot c:\windows/ /s o:
(the letter is O)
 

Colif

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can you show us a screenshot of disk management? the only 500mb partition I have is the recovery partition and its not my boot partition. JUst want to confirm it before diving in and possibly making it worse.

/s <volume letter>
Optional. Specifies the volume letter of the system partition. This option should not be used in typical deployment scenarios.
Use this setting to specify a system partition when you are configuring a drive that will be booted on another computer, such as a USB flash drive or a secondary hard drive.
UEFI
:​
  • BCDBoot copies the boot files to either the EFI system partition, or the partition specified by the /s option.
    BCDBoot creates the BCD store in the same partition.
    By default, BCDBoot creates a Windows Boot Manager entry in the NVRAM on the firmware to identify the boot files on the system partition. If the /s option is used, then this entry is not created. Instead, BCDBoot relies on the default firmware settings to identify the boot files on the system partition. By the UEFI 2.3.1 spec, the default firmware settings should open the file: \efi\boot\bootx64.efi in the EFI System Partition (ESP).
BIOS:​
  1. BCDBoot copies the boot files to either the active partition on the primary hard drive, or the partition specified by the /s option.
  2. BCDBoot creates the BCD store in the same partition.
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/manufacture/desktop/bcdboot-command-line-options-techref-di

Looks like that command not the right one

I wrote this: bcdboot c:\windows/ /s o:
try removing the / after windows, the example on link above shows

bcdboot C:\Windows /s S:
 
Last edited:

Colif

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It won't work. Your hard drives are formatted as MBR. On an MBR system, the boot partition has to be 1st partition on the drive. So even if you did manage to copy the boot details over onto O the PC wouldn't be able to boot off it.

now there are 2 ways to fix this...

download the Windows 10 media creation tool and use it to make a win 10 installer on USB

1. you can try to create the mbr on C but before you do it, take all other drives out of PC or the process will just use the pre existing one
obviously PC won't boot without the missing partition so use the installer
change boot order so USB is first, hdd second
boot from installer
on screen after languages, choose repair this pc, not install.
choose troubleshoot
choose advanced
choose command prompt
Follow this: https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-rebuild-the-bcd-in-windows-2624508

2. other way is a fresh install of win 10 but without any other drives attached as then windows will have to make the boot partition on the ssd. Once windows boots from drive without usb, unplug PC, reattach the other hdd(s) and make sure the other drive isn't added to boot order

or just ignore it and fix next time you fresh install, as both drives are ssd (right?) so boot times aren't going to be much faster regardless of where boot partition is.
 
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Apr 23, 2018
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ok...
the samsung pro is 3.500mb/s and writes 2.700 and the intel only has 500 read and writes so does it harm the samsung speed if the boot files are on the intel slow ssd?
 

Colif

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all the boot files do is point at the location on the Samsung drive where windows actually is so I really doubt that will slow it down.

the only problem is if the intel ssd ever dies, or is removed, windows won't be able to boot the Samsung, so you will need to fix it at some stage.
 
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Colif

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My option 1 may not work since you have created an active partition on that drive (o). On my 1st install of win 10 I somehow managed to only have 1 partition and C drive was also the boot partition. So I know windows can do it, but that active partition might be used instead... which won't help.
 

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