Question Pop and skunky burning smell - Brand new custom PC; Ryzen 3900x, GTX 2080ti, x570 Auros Master

Jun 23, 2019
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Hi,

I set up my new custom PC after thoroughly reading the manual. I am SURE I plugged everything correctly into the motherboard from my Corsair HX1000 PSU. (All the fans and LEDS worked great; although the fact that they worked is not the reason I am certain things were plugged in correctly; instead, the mobo's guide was very clear, and everything made sense that I was plugging in; I had no guess work throughout this process).

I set everything up and had the PC post with no issue. Benchmarks were GREAT. Temperatures were fantastic, and everything was just a dream.

But suddenly, while watching a youtube video, the PC just powered off. Nothing other than an instant powering off.

I pressed the power button and heard a gentle pop, and then burning smell. If I am being honest, it smelled as if my dog had just taken a dump nearby. I literally got up and went in to check on my dog. After seeing that was not the case, I realize it was my PC. I smelled around and it definitely centered around the PSU, or the very bottom of the motherboard.

I see zero sings of damage anywhere. If I plug the PSU in, and DO NOT turn the computer on, via the PS_SW of the tower, nor via the on-board power switch, then the "stand-by" lights of the motherboard light up.

However, I tested one final time, and am not going to do so again at this time; I pressed the on-board PS_SW button of the mobo to test it. The motherboard turns on for half a second. Nearly all the fans spin. But a very gentle pop happens after half a second, and it all powers down. I instantly smell the skunky odor, and again localized it to the the very bottom of the motherboard/or PSU.

This is brand spanking new... is the PSU a lemon? Is this an indication that I f'ed something up? I followed the mobo instructions explicitly, and cannot imagine what was done incorrectly. I had the computer up and running for 8 hours today. Absolutely ALL of the LED's and fans worked perfectly the instant I first posted the BIOS. Additionally, I watched several pc building guides. The one I remember best was Bitwit's. I followed everything that matched for my parts given his guide(s).

Nothing seemed to be wrong at any point. Until now. Clearly, the PSU is not entirely fried. Neither is the motherboard, if I can turn the PSU on without turning the mobo on, and still get the motherboard's stand-by lights on...

But I really really would appreciate any advice you guys have to keep me from further damaging anything here. I have an old PC with a 1200 KW PSU that has worked for over 6 years now. Is it wise for me to switch this HX1000 out, plug all the cables in, and give that I try??
 

AllanGH

Estimable
Mar 10, 2019
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Sometimes new PSUs fail.

Time to send it back for replacement.

Before you install a new PSU, though, you need to insure that there are no shorts being caused by motherboard standoffs, or a stray screw that dropped out of "something", and disassembling the whole thing is the best way to make confirm that.
 
Jun 23, 2019
24
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25
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Sometimes new PSUs fail.

Time to send it back for replacement.

Before you install a new PSU, though, you need to insure that there are no shorts being caused by motherboard standoffs, or a stray screw that dropped out of "something", and disassembling the whole thing is the best way to make confirm that.
Today I unconnected my Corsair HX1000 PSU and went to BestBuy to pick up an EVGA 1000W replacement. Instantly after reconnecting everything, it booted just fine. I checked all the internals and did benchmarks. Everything is as I expect it to be.

I also made sure that the mobo standouts were correct and that nothing was touching the board that could have caused this problem.

So to confirm, the Corsair HX1000 burnt out, or something inside blew out and burned. Whatever it was, I had it plugged-in to an expensive 3 layer surge protector and it blew out, so I can only assume it was a faulty unit. Unfortunate, but I am just so grateful that it didn't damage anything else when it blew out.
 

AllanGH

Estimable
Mar 10, 2019
2,552
533
3,240
81
It is not characteristic of the Corsair line, at that badge-level; so, as tempting as it may be to shy-away from the brand, don't. Corsair does make some of the best PSUs out there, as long as you stay in the upper layers of their quality offerings.

Get it replaced, and test it out, then you have an excellent PSU for your next build.
 

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