[SOLVED] Possible to overclock this? (Gigabyte B660 Gaming X DDR4, i5-12400F)

iSpextor

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Oct 24, 2019
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Hello everyone,

I would like my i5-12400F to reach 4.4 GHz and I thought it would be no problem, but after looking up some things it sounds like it is not possible to overclock with my B660 Gaming X DDR4 Motherboard?

Please let me know if this is true, and if not, would you know a recommended clock?
 

Karadjgne

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You are looking at the performance from a clock ratio standpoint and not other views. Which is what's causing your worry, but easily overlooked.

Clock speeds are not just the speed in GHz. That by itself is misleading. A major player in cpu performance is IPC, which is instructions per clock cycle. If your old cpu could manage 10 instructions per Hz, your new cpu can manage 15 instructions. For simple math sake, that'd be 10 x speed per second vs 15 x speed per second. If your old cpu could manage 10 x 4.4GHz that's 44G instructions per second. The new cpu at 15 x 4.0 GHz is 60G instructions per second. Way faster, much higher performance, even if physically 400MHz slower.

You'd need to OC the 9600k to @ 6.0GHz to put that cpu on an even performance with a 12400F at 4.0GHz. Roughly. Doesn't always translate well to FPS, since the cpu Can do 60G IPC, but doesn't always Get 60G instructions handed to it by ram, storage, game code etc.
 
Last edited:

Zerk2012

Titan
Ambassador
Hello everyone,

I would like my i5-12400F to reach 4.4 GHz and I thought it would be no problem, but after looking up some things it sounds like it is not possible to overclock with my B660 Gaming X DDR4 Motherboard?

Please let me know if this is true, and if not, would you know a recommended clock?
No the motherboard and CPU are not made to overclock.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
You are looking at the performance from a clock ratio standpoint and not other views. Which is what's causing your worry, but easily overlooked.

Clock speeds are not just the speed in GHz. That by itself is misleading. A major player in cpu performance is IPC, which is instructions per clock cycle. If your old cpu could manage 10 instructions per Hz, your new cpu can manage 15 instructions. For simple math sake, that'd be 10 x speed per second vs 15 x speed per second. If your old cpu could manage 10 x 4.4GHz that's 44G instructions per second. The new cpu at 15 x 4.0 GHz is 60G instructions per second. Way faster, much higher performance, even if physically 400MHz slower.

You'd need to OC the 9600k to @ 6.0GHz to put that cpu on an even performance with a 12400F at 4.0GHz. Roughly. Doesn't always translate well to FPS, since the cpu Can do 60G IPC, but doesn't always Get 60G instructions handed to it by ram, storage, game code etc.
 
Last edited:

iSpextor

Reputable
Oct 24, 2019
29
0
4,540
1
You are looking at the performance from a clock ratio standpoint and not other views. Which is what's causing your worry, but easily overlooked.

Clock speeds are not just the speed in GHz. That by itself is misleading. A major player in cpu performance is IPC, which is instructions per clock cycle. If your old cpu could manage 10 instructions per Hz, your new cpu can manage 15 instructions. For simple math sake, that'd be 10 x speed per second vs 15 x speed per second. If your old cpu could manage 10 x 4.4GHz that's 44G instructions per second. The new cpu at 15 x 4.0 GHz is 60G instructions per second. Way faster, much higher performance, even if physically 400MHz slower.

You'd need to OC the 9600k to @ 6.0GHz to put that cpu on an even performance with a 12400F at 4.0GHz. Roughly. Doesn't always translate well to FPS, since the cpu Can do 60G IPC, but doesn't always Get 60G instructions handed to it by ram, storage, game code etc.
That's very reassuring, thank you so much for the great explanation!
 

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