Question Potential bottleneck?

Jun 9, 2019
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0
10
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System

RYZEN 3 2200G
R9 270 (non X)
A320 MOBO
600W NO 80+ PSU (temporary untill Xmas)
1TB WD blue
8GB DDR4 2400MHZ


So, I have a overall proplem in all games. Its not like I stutter, but its more of a sluggish and slow looking proplems, I will stutter occasionally. But it's mainly the sluggish and slow (the only way I feel I can describe it) feel to my games. Coukd this he because of My CPU and GPU combo. And or if anyone knows why this could he happening, please let me know. Thanks.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Windows 10?

There are three tools available to monitor system performance: Task Manager, Resource Monitor, and Process Explorer.

The first two are built into Windows. You may have to download Process Explorer ia Microsoft's website.

Use each of the tools (one at a time) to observe system operation and performance.

First at boot up, second while doing things other than gaming, and lastly while gaming.

While gaming, remember you are troubleshooting, not playing to win. So readily go into situations where you may lose; i.e., a very busy screen full of enemies galore....

Very likely you will discover the location of the bottleneck and what app, process, or service is causing the bottleneck.

Could be a combination of events so test carefully and methodically.

Pay close attention to any thing being launched at startup (Task Manager, Startup tab).

Do not immediately react to some finding. Verify, research, and then make some change but only one change at a time.

Keep notes so you can undo something that goes astray.

Most important: be sure to backup everything and verify that the backups are recoverable and readable.

Just in case.....
 
Jun 9, 2019
21
0
10
0
Windows 10?

There are three tools available to monitor system performance: Task Manager, Resource Monitor, and Process Explorer.

The first two are built into Windows. You may have to download Process Explorer ia Microsoft's website.

Use each of the tools (one at a time) to observe system operation and performance.

First at boot up, second while doing things other than gaming, and lastly while gaming.

While gaming, remember you are troubleshooting, not playing to win. So readily go into situations where you may lose; i.e., a very busy screen full of enemies galore....

Very likely you will discover the location of the bottleneck and what app, process, or service is causing the bottleneck.

Could be a combination of events so test carefully and methodically.

Pay close attention to any thing being launched at startup (Task Manager, Startup tab).

Do not immediately react to some finding. Verify, research, and then make some change but only one change at a time.

Keep notes so you can undo something that goes astray.

Most important: be sure to backup everything and verify that the backups are recoverable and readable.

Just in case.....
OK, right. Firstly thanks for helping me. 2nd: I'm only 15, meaning my knowledge of troubleshooting ect is very limited. And I don't know how to bring up my CPU, GPU stats ect. And I'm on win 10 yes, unactivated, also when you say keep backups? Backuos of what. What do i need to save?
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Will start by concurring with @mdd1963. Simply put if your hardware is not up to the specifications required by any given game then the game will not play well.

Most games list three sets of specifications: minimal, recommended, and best. You do not want minimal and you do want as much "best" as you can afford.

Compare game hardware requirements to your computer's current hardware configuration. May be a bit difficult to do. (More on that to follow.)

Your post:

1) You are welcome. And do pay attention to other posts and suggestions. Others will try to help and I have no problem with that.

2) Do not put yourself at a disadvantage because you are only 15. That will pass - for better or worse. :)

There is no better time to start learning and I will submit that a good gamer who learns about hardware, software, and troubleshooting will become a better gamer. And probably will have more fun overall.

I.e.; Learn about your computer.

In the lower left screen corner is a box that reads "Type here to search". Type in "Task Manager" to start with. Explore the screens, windows, and tabs that appear. Do not change anything. Do the same with respect to two other built-in tools: "Resource Monitor" and "Reliability History".

You will find a whole new world with respect to computers and certainly more challenging than many games.

Backups.

Most people use computers for work and school purposes. All that work is saved on the computer. If the computer or some component is damaged all that work is often lost. To protect against data loss backup copies of that data are made and saved to other media, computers, or somewhere in the cloud. Multiple copies in different locations is advised.

Having backups makes it easier to recover and restore a computer to its original working condition once the failed components are fixed.

However, a hardware failure is not always the cause. User errors (very common), malware, viruses, and corrupted software can likewise wipe out everything important to you that is on your computer. Photos, music, videos, homework.....

Lots of online tutorials regarding how to do backups and recoveries. Read some of those and protect your work and data accordingly.

Should be a priority at all times but even more so when signs of a problem appear.
 
Jun 9, 2019
21
0
10
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A 1200G is an entry level processor, and, an R9-270 is hardly the entry target 1080P card for today's gaming...

(I suspect that with any modern games, you will be turning down resolution and texture detail to low/medium...; but, even so, your target will be 50-60 frames/sec, avoid be trying to use 100/144 Hz monitors, as you lack CPU and GPU for that target..)

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hYM96VovS1Y
I understand, BTW its a 2200g. And I'm currently using a 32 inch sharp tv. I'm upgrading to a basic 60hz 1-4ms moniter at Xmas along with a better gpu
 
Sep 5, 2019
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I understand, BTW its a 2200g. And I'm currently using a 32 inch sharp tv. I'm upgrading to a basic 60hz 1-4ms moniter at Xmas along with a better gpu
That right there may very well be one of the issues. I started on a simple "1080p" tv and while it works, they do not have that silky smooth feel like a proper computer monitor has. The biggest thing is what are you trying to run? What resolutions and target fps?
 
Jun 9, 2019
21
0
10
0
That right there may very well be one of the issues. I started on a simple "1080p" tv and while it works, they do not have that silky smooth feel like a proper computer monitor has. The biggest thing is what are you trying to run? What resolutions and target fps?
I mainly play fortnite atm as that's the only thing I can run without it being unplayable. I play 720p and my fps is all over the place because all I ever seen to experience is fps drops
 
Jun 9, 2019
21
0
10
0
Will start by concurring with @mdd1963. Simply put if your hardware is not up to the specifications required by any given game then the game will not play well.

Most games list three sets of specifications: minimal, recommended, and best. You do not want minimal and you do want as much "best" as you can afford.

Compare game hardware requirements to your computer's current hardware configuration. May be a bit difficult to do. (More on that to follow.)

Your post:

1) You are welcome. And do pay attention to other posts and suggestions. Others will try to help and I have no problem with that.

2) Do not put yourself at a disadvantage because you are only 15. That will pass - for better or worse. :)

There is no better time to start learning and I will submit that a good gamer who learns about hardware, software, and troubleshooting will become a better gamer. And probably will have more fun overall.

I.e.; Learn about your computer.

In the lower left screen corner is a box that reads "Type here to search". Type in "Task Manager" to start with. Explore the screens, windows, and tabs that appear. Do not change anything. Do the same with respect to two other built-in tools: "Resource Monitor" and "Reliability History".

You will find a whole new world with respect to computers and certainly more challenging than many games.

Backups.

Most people use computers for work and school purposes. All that work is saved on the computer. If the computer or some component is damaged all that work is often lost. To protect against data loss backup copies of that data are made and saved to other media, computers, or somewhere in the cloud. Multiple copies in different locations is advised.

Having backups makes it easier to recover and restore a computer to its original working condition once the failed components are fixed.

However, a hardware failure is not always the cause. User errors (very common), malware, viruses, and corrupted software can likewise wipe out everything important to you that is on your computer. Photos, music, videos, homework.....

Lots of online tutorials regarding how to do backups and recoveries. Read some of those and protect your work and data accordingly.

Should be a priority at all times but even more so when signs of a problem appear.
Once again thanks for all the help. I do have hardware knowledge. I've been learning for about 8 months now. It's the solving problems when they arrise. Benchmarking ect. That I don't really have a grasp on just yet
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
You are welcome.

"It's the solving problems when they arrise. Benchmarking ect. That I don't really have a grasp on just yet."

Troubleshooting (solving problems) is both art and science. You will get better at solving problems with time, education, and experience.

Not always easy. If you truly enjoy computers and IT then just keep learning and doing.

That is why I am "here".
 

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