Question Potential Build

May 11, 2021
8
1
15
0
Over the summer I was planning on building my first PC and I was wondering if these components are compatible and worth getting or if anyone has any advice for the parts or a first time builder?

Intel i5-11600k
Asus B560M Plus Wifi
G.Skill Trident Z RGB 2x8 3600MHz CL16
Samsung 970 Evo Plus 500Mb
Seagate IronWolf Pro 4tb
Lían Li LANCOOl 205M
Nzxt AER RGB 2 Fans x 3
Nzxt Kraken Z53
Corsair RM750
Asus RTX 3060 ti once they come back in stock.

This would cost just over £1,400
 
You could reasonably build as is.
Some thoughts:
I5-11400 is an excellent budget gamer, virtually the same performance as the 11600K
Either(non F) has integrated graphics that lets you get going.
Gaming performance will be dictated by the graphics card mostly.
Here is a review:
You will not need an aftermarket cooler for the 11400, it comes with an intel stock cooler that will be sufficient in a nice case like yours. 11400 is not a hot processor.
You can defer on any cooler and see if you really need one.
If you opt for the 11600K you will need a cooler, but nothing really fancy is needed.
A simple noctua cooler with a 120mm fan would be about right.
Reports of high heat come from those who are overclocking and boosting voltages.
11th gen does a good job of turbo management so overclocking is not appropriate unless you are running batch apps where all core overclocking will help.
The problem with aio coolers is how to mount them.
If you mount the radiator in front as intake, the cpu gets cooled well, but the motherboard vrm and graphics card gets hot air to work with.
Good thing about air is that it does not wear out like aio, and it will never leak.

For certain, buy a ssd for your C drive.
Stick with Samsung for quality.
It matters little if it is m.2 or 2.5" or if it is sata or pcie.
I suggest you defer on the hard drive until you actually need the room.
Buy a 1 or 2tb ssd up front.

750w is good, rm is good quality.
Seasonic focus is equally good.

FWIW:
MY build process:

Before anything, while waiting for your parts to be delivered, download
and read, cover to cover your case and motherboard manual.
Buy a #2 magnetic tip philips screwdriver.
I find it handy to buy a power switch like this for testing.
https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16812119009?Description=power switch&cm_re=power_switch--12-119-009--Product&quicklink=true
1. I assemble the critical parts outside of the case.
That lets me test them for functionality easily.
A wood table or cardboard is fine.
2. Plug in only the necessary parts at first. Ram, cpu, cooler, psu.
Do not force anything. Parts fit only one way.
Attach a monitor to the integrated motherboard adapter if you have one, otherwise to the graphics card.
  1. If your motherboard does not have a PWR button, momentarily touch the two pwr front panel pins with a flat blade screwdriver.
  2. Repeatedly hit F2 or DEL, and that should get you into the bios display.
  3. Boot from a cd or usb stick with memtest86 on it. memtest will exercise your ram and cpu functionality.
  4. Install windows.
  5. Install the motherboard cd drivers. Particularly the lan drivers so you can access the internet.
Do not select the easy install option, or you will get a bunch of utilities and trialware that you don't want. Drivers only.
  1. Connect to the internet and install an antivirus program. Microsoft defender is free, easy, and unobtrusive.
  2. Install your graphics card and driver if you tested with integrated graphics.
You will need to remove the graphics card later to install your motherboard in the case.
As a tip when screwing the motherboard into the posts, give the screw a small counterclockwise turn until you feel a click.
That lets you know that the screw will engage properly.
Make a note of how the graphics card latches into the pcie slot.
The mechanism will be hidden under the card and may be difficult to work if you have not previously checked how.
  1. Update windows to currency.
  2. Only now do I take apart what I need to and install it in the case.
  3. Now is the time to reinstall your graphics card.
 
Reactions: Why_Me and Hxrdy256
May 11, 2021
8
1
15
0
You could reasonably build as is.
Some thoughts:
I5-11400 is an excellent budget gamer, virtually the same performance as the 11600K
Either(non F) has integrated graphics that lets you get going.
Gaming performance will be dictated by the graphics card mostly.
Here is a review:
You will not need an aftermarket cooler for the 11400, it comes with an intel stock cooler that will be sufficient in a nice case like yours. 11400 is not a hot processor.
You can defer on any cooler and see if you really need one.
If you opt for the 11600K you will need a cooler, but nothing really fancy is needed.
A simple noctua cooler with a 120mm fan would be about right.
Reports of high heat come from those who are overclocking and boosting voltages.
11th gen does a good job of turbo management so overclocking is not appropriate unless you are running batch apps where all core overclocking will help.
The problem with aio coolers is how to mount them.
If you mount the radiator in front as intake, the cpu gets cooled well, but the motherboard vrm and graphics card gets hot air to work with.
Good thing about air is that it does not wear out like aio, and it will never leak.

For certain, buy a ssd for your C drive.
Stick with Samsung for quality.
It matters little if it is m.2 or 2.5" or if it is sata or pcie.
I suggest you defer on the hard drive until you actually need the room.
Buy a 1 or 2tb ssd up front.

750w is good, rm is good quality.
Seasonic focus is equally good.

FWIW:
MY build process:

Before anything, while waiting for your parts to be delivered, download
and read, cover to cover your case and motherboard manual.
Buy a #2 magnetic tip philips screwdriver.
I find it handy to buy a power switch like this for testing.
https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16812119009?Description=power switch&cm_re=power_switch--12-119-009--Product&quicklink=true
1. I assemble the critical parts outside of the case.
That lets me test them for functionality easily.
A wood table or cardboard is fine.
2. Plug in only the necessary parts at first. Ram, cpu, cooler, psu.
Do not force anything. Parts fit only one way.
Attach a monitor to the integrated motherboard adapter if you have one, otherwise to the graphics card.
  1. If your motherboard does not have a PWR button, momentarily touch the two pwr front panel pins with a flat blade screwdriver.
  2. Repeatedly hit F2 or DEL, and that should get you into the bios display.
  3. Boot from a cd or usb stick with memtest86 on it. memtest will exercise your ram and cpu functionality.
  4. Install windows.
  5. Install the motherboard cd drivers. Particularly the lan drivers so you can access the internet.
Do not select the easy install option, or you will get a bunch of utilities and trialware that you don't want. Drivers only.
  1. Connect to the internet and install an antivirus program. Microsoft defender is free, easy, and unobtrusive.
  2. Install your graphics card and driver if you tested with integrated graphics.
You will need to remove the graphics card later to install your motherboard in the case.
As a tip when screwing the motherboard into the posts, give the screw a small counterclockwise turn until you feel a click.
That lets you know that the screw will engage properly.
Make a note of how the graphics card latches into the pcie slot.
The mechanism will be hidden under the card and may be difficult to work if you have not previously checked how.
  1. Update windows to currency.
  2. Only now do I take apart what I need to and install it in the case.
  3. Now is the time to reinstall your graphics card.

Thanks for your reply.

I did consider the i5-11400 but I saw that the i5-11600k was only marginally more expensive. I also want the opportunity to overclock in the future once I get a compatible motherboard.

I also chose the Kraken Z53 as I have heard very good things about the cooling however I'm not sure where is the best place to position the radiator.

Thanks a lot for your building tips as well, they are really helpful.
 
Thanks for your reply.

I did consider the i5-11400 but I saw that the i5-11600k was only marginally more expensive. I also want the opportunity to overclock in the future once I get a compatible motherboard.

I also chose the Kraken Z53 as I have heard very good things about the cooling however I'm not sure where is the best place to position the radiator.

Thanks a lot for your building tips as well, they are really helpful.
You want a Z590 board if you plan on OC that cpu. B560 boards were meant for locked cpu's. With that said you can turn off the power limiter in the bios on a B560 board and run a locked cpu in turbo boost mode which is a round a bout way of OC locked intel cpu's.
 
Reactions: Hxrdy256
May 11, 2021
8
1
15
0
You want a Z590 board if you plan on OC that cpu. B560 boards were meant for locked cpu's. With that said you can turn off the power limiter in the bios on a B560 board and run a locked cpu in turbo boost mode which is a round a bout way of OC locked intel cpu's.
You want a Z590 board if you plan on OC that cpu. B560 boards were meant for locked cpu's. With that said you can turn off the power limiter in the bios on a B560 board and run a locked cpu in turbo boost mode which is a round a bout way of OC locked intel cpu's.
Oh thanks for letting me know I had no idea that was possible.
 
Reactions: Why_Me

ASK THE COMMUNITY