Question Potential Packet Loss?

Mar 12, 2019
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Hello there!

So, let me get right into it!

Around 3-4 days ago I started to recognize and unusual amount of latency fluctuations while playing online games such as Rust, League of Legends and Rainbow Six: Siege. At first I thought nothing of it as the internet's ping normally sits at 20-25 ms when my brother is not home for for 2-3 days he came back (he craves Netflix and on rural broadband this really has a big impact).

My internet is Sky FTTC:
Download: 9mbps
Upload: 1mbps

But anyway, he has now left and it is still having this issue. When I am on applications such a Discord or Team speak it displays your ping and also other connection information such as packet loss and I have noticed that my ping sits at around 15-25 ms but I spike very often to around 20-50% packet loss which is what I assume is causing me the issue.

I have done multiple restarts for the router and tried plugging the Ethernet I use for my desktop into other ports. I have also tried doing these tests wirlessly with a differant computer but it still shows similar results so I am very confused and stuck.

I have attached a photo of some netmeter ping tests as they may or may not be useful!

View: https://imgur.com/a/U45EUzS
 
Generic tools like that don't tell you a lot. If you were to call the ISP they would of course blame the web site which it very well could be.

So you could try a tool called pathping but it can be hard to read.

Your better option is to run tracert to say 8.8.8.8. It likely will show nothing useful the goal is to get the ip of the routers in the path.

You now leave constant ping commands run in back ground windows to each hop. Really hop 1 and hop2 are the most important. Hop2 represents the connection between your house and the ISP. This is the simplest one to get the ISP to try to fix. The reason you need hop 1 is to prevent the ISP from blaming your pc or router. You need to show them that hop 1 is good and hop 2 is bad.

If both hop 1 and hop2 show no issues you can continue but the farther you get from your house the more likely the ISP can not fix it. The level 1 techs have limited access and if you get far enough away it may not even be the ISP network.
 

MarcusP

Commendable
Jul 8, 2017
11
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1,510
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Generic tools like that don't tell you a lot. If you were to call the ISP they would of course blame the web site which it very well could be.

So you could try a tool called pathping but it can be hard to read.

Your better option is to run tracert to say 8.8.8.8. It likely will show nothing useful the goal is to get the ip of the routers in the path.

You now leave constant ping commands run in back ground windows to each hop. Really hop 1 and hop2 are the most important. Hop2 represents the connection between your house and the ISP. This is the simplest one to get the ISP to try to fix. The reason you need hop 1 is to prevent the ISP from blaming your pc or router. You need to show them that hop 1 is good and hop 2 is bad.

If both hop 1 and hop2 show no issues you can continue but the farther you get from your house the more likely the ISP can not fix it. The level 1 techs have limited access and if you get far enough away it may not even be the ISP network.
Hi bill and thanks for the reply.

So I should cmd run tracers 8.8.8.8 ?
 

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