Question Power failure protection for Samsung 860 Evo 250GB SSD (Mz-76E250Bw)

mpadhu

Honorable
May 31, 2014
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Hey Guys,


I own a Samsung 860 EVO 250 GB 2.5"SSD. We all know that the magnetic disk drives when gets turned off abrupty due to power failure, causes damage to it. Windows asks for disk check to fix the bad sectors when it happens.
Wondering if this SSD has power failure protection, which means arranging the files and shutting off things when the power goes off abruptly so that the Windows OS does not gets corrupted.

Product reference:
 

RealBeast

Titan
Moderator
Nope, you should use a UPS to allow an orderly shutdown. The better brands like APC attach to the computer with a USB cable and allow you to run for some period of time and then automatically do an orderly shutdown if the power stays out.
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
Hey Guys,


I own a Samsung 860 EVO 250 GB 2.5"SSD. We all know that the magnetic disk drives when gets turned off abrupty due to power failure, causes damage to it. Windows asks for disk check to fix the bad sectors when it happens.
Wondering if this SSD has power failure protection, which means arranging the files and shutting off things when the power goes off abruptly so that the Windows OS does not gets corrupted.

Product reference:
There are some SSDs which have "supercapacitors" which provide power for orderly completion of writes. -- https://www.truenas.com/community/threads/list-of-ssds-with-power-loss-protection.63998/
The 860EVO is not one of them.
 
We all know that the magnetic disk drives when gets turned off abrupty due to power failure, causes damage to it. Windows asks for disk check to fix the bad sectors when it happens.
Upon power loss, a hard drive will perform an emergency retract which utilises the kinetic energy of the spindle motor to provide the power for the voice coil. HDDs are rarely physically damaged by such events.

NTFS is a journalling file system which keeps a record of each transaction. If these transactions are not completed, then the OS will see the NTFS "dirty bit" when the drive is next powered up. The OS can then use the journal to restore the file system to a consistent state.

Locating the NTFS "dirty bit":
http://www.hddoracle.com/viewtopic.php?f=117&t=2126
 

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