[SOLVED] power limit throttling

Sep 8, 2022
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hi everyone while i used xtu for a stress test it showed that i have power limit throttling. my mobo is asus tuf z490 plus, my cpu is i9 10850k and my psu is corsair rm750w.i dont really know what can cause this. i even updated bios but it didnt seem to help. i'll really appreciate the help!
 

uWebb429

Estimable
can someone help please?
You have a power limit throttling problem. This has nothing to do with your CPU cooler or airflow.

The default turbo power limits for a 10850K are not enough to achieve maximum performance during a stress test. At default settings, during any long term test, the CPU will be forced to slow down so it does not exceed the 125W rated TDP.

If your cooling is adequate, you might need 250W or a little more to maintain maximum performance and zero power limit throttling during a stress test. I like running Cinebench R20 or R23 which is a realistic full load test. Some people like running Prime95 but I think that is an excessive load compared to the apps and games that most people run.

Have a look in your BIOS for the long and short term turbo power limits which are also called PL1 and PL2.



Increase PL1 from 125W to 250W or beyond. If you cannot find this setting in your BIOS, you can use ThrottleStop or the bloated Intel XTU to access the turbo power limits in real time.

I set my 10850K to 300W for PL1 and PL2. No more power limit throttling except when doing some extreme overclocking. No need to use the Lock option unless your computer is changing the power limits while in Windows.



Most 10850K are programmed to use excessive voltage at default settings. A -50 mV undervolt is usually 100% stable and can help reduce full load power consumption and temperatures significantly. Here is an example of a 10850K running a full load Cinebench test reliably at under 60°C. Reducing the voltage can really help.



Use HWiNFO to see what it reports for VCore voltage when the CPU is loaded. Ignore the XTU VID voltage value.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: John Chesterfield
Sep 8, 2022
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1
15
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How is it mounted in your build? How are the fans oriented in said build? Make and model of your chassis?
its mounted with the radiator on the top, my case is corsair 5000D airflow and i have three fans on the front of the case, three on top (with the radiator), one at the rear, and three on the side, i checked all of them and they seem fine and with the right setup.
 
Sep 8, 2022
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Which fans are intakes and which are exhaust in your build? As for the stress testing part, did you perform an overclock on said platform? BIOS version for your motherboard at this moment of time?
the front 3 fans are intake, the ones on the top are exhaust, the rear is exhaust and the tree on side are intake. and the bios version is 2601, didnt perform any overclocking apart from the xmp profile (which turned on by defult).
 
Last edited:

uWebb429

Estimable
can someone help please?
You have a power limit throttling problem. This has nothing to do with your CPU cooler or airflow.

The default turbo power limits for a 10850K are not enough to achieve maximum performance during a stress test. At default settings, during any long term test, the CPU will be forced to slow down so it does not exceed the 125W rated TDP.

If your cooling is adequate, you might need 250W or a little more to maintain maximum performance and zero power limit throttling during a stress test. I like running Cinebench R20 or R23 which is a realistic full load test. Some people like running Prime95 but I think that is an excessive load compared to the apps and games that most people run.

Have a look in your BIOS for the long and short term turbo power limits which are also called PL1 and PL2.



Increase PL1 from 125W to 250W or beyond. If you cannot find this setting in your BIOS, you can use ThrottleStop or the bloated Intel XTU to access the turbo power limits in real time.

I set my 10850K to 300W for PL1 and PL2. No more power limit throttling except when doing some extreme overclocking. No need to use the Lock option unless your computer is changing the power limits while in Windows.



Most 10850K are programmed to use excessive voltage at default settings. A -50 mV undervolt is usually 100% stable and can help reduce full load power consumption and temperatures significantly. Here is an example of a 10850K running a full load Cinebench test reliably at under 60°C. Reducing the voltage can really help.



Use HWiNFO to see what it reports for VCore voltage when the CPU is loaded. Ignore the XTU VID voltage value.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: John Chesterfield
Sep 8, 2022
14
1
15
0
You have a power limit throttling problem. This has nothing to do with your CPU cooler or airflow.

The default turbo power limits for a 10850K are not enough to achieve maximum performance during a stress test. At default settings, during any long term test, the CPU will be forced to slow down so it does not exceed the 125W rated TDP.

If your cooling is adequate, you might need 250W or a little more to maintain maximum performance and zero power limit throttling during a stress test. I like running Cinebench R20 or R23 which is a realistic full load test. Some people like running Prime95 but I think that is an excessive load compared to the apps and games that most people run.

Have a look in your BIOS for the long and short term turbo power limits which are also called PL1 and PL2.



Increase PL1 from 125W to 250W or beyond. If you cannot find this setting in your BIOS, you can use ThrottleStop or the bloated Intel XTU to access the turbo power limits in real time.

I set my 10850K to 300W for PL1 and PL2. No more power limit throttling except when doing some extreme overclocking. No need to use the Lock option unless your computer is changing the power limits while in Windows.



Most 10850K are programmed to use excessive voltage at default settings. A -50 mV undervolt is usually 100% stable and can help reduce full load power consumption and temperatures significantly. Here is an example of a 10850K running a full load Cinebench test reliably at under 60°C. Reducing the voltage can really help.



Use HWiNFO to see what it reports for VCore voltage when the CPU is loaded. Ignore the XTU VID voltage value.
you're a life saver! i did exactly what you've told me and as of now i cant see any throttling. thank you so much!
 
Reactions: uWebb429

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