Question Power pins.

Apr 27, 2019
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Are the power inputs and voltages on 478 socket pin locations the same for all compatable CPU'S.
 

Darkbreeze

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"For all COMPATIBLE CPUs", on socket 478 systems, yes. At least as far as specifications are concerned. Actual voltage at any given pin could I imagine be different depending on the requirements of the CPU model and what memory is used.
 

Darkbreeze

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Instantly. There is no provision for running ANY consumer desktop processor, or any enterprise model for that matter, without a heatsink or HSF, pretty much ever. If you want to kill a CPU, run it without a cooler. As popatim has mentioned, on older models it would instantly kill it. On the last ten generations or so, it would just cause it to throttle itself or shut down, but it will still cause damage and incrementally destroy the CPU sooner rather than later.
 
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Apr 27, 2019
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Thanks guys, I will take all of that good advice under consideration. Running a cpu without a heatsink is not something that I would normally do. I would hate to have a melt down on my MB.
I was trouble shooting a used CPU to see if it still worked and if a slower speed cpu would get as hot as quickly as a higher speed cpu.
Great forum, keep up the good work..
 

Darkbreeze

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Most of those still had heatsinks of SOME kind though. They may not have all had active cooling, but all of the 386 and 486 systems I've owned had at least a heatsink even if they had no fan. Usually, I would add active cooling back then. I honestly can't remember prior to that, but then you're getting so far back that you're talking magnitudes fewer transistors and much less heat, so they really didn't usually need them unless you were doing something exotic or particularly heavy duty, when that was even possible.
 

AllanGH

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Through the 80286's, you had no heat sinks.
Lower clocked '386's were the same.
By the time you hit the '386DX40 you did have active cooling.
Low-speed '486SXs fell back to no heat sinks at all. Increased clocks came with heatsinks and some fans.
486DXs were a mixed bag of passive heat sinks and active cooling.
From the Pentium 1s-on you had active cooling in all instances.
 

Darkbreeze

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That may be true Allan, however, in MY experience, all of the 486's, both SX and DX, had at least heatsinks, whether they had fans on them or not. Granted, I probably only had maybe four different systems that were 80486 based, but I also worked on a number of them and I can't recall any of them not at least having a heatsink. For 80386, that is where I saw a mixed bag with some having heatsinks and some not having them. Regardless, I think we are off topic now.
 

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