Discussion Power supply / PSU models - What to buy, what to avoid - And PSU discussion thread

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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
He might. He's not an EVGA fan though TBH. Well, specifically, if that is a Super Flower built unit, he's not a Super Flower fan. He tends to bash them, sometimes deservedly, when given the chance. Sometimes not deservedly.
 

Aeacus

Illustrious
Herald
Well thise models are one i often see for lower prices.

Im not sure how good they are and cannot find reviews, but i think it wiuld be nice to be able to say whether they are good or not.
You need to have a higher level of Google-Fu to find a review of EVGA GD series. :sol:

Since EVGA GD series is exclusively released only for Chinese market, the review of EVGA 550 GD is also in Mandarin,
link: http://coolpc.com.tw/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?f=69&t=234830

Some further info about that unit,
official specs: https://tw.evga.com/Products/Product.aspx?pn=100-GD-0550-V7
official data sheet: https://www.evga.com/Products/Specs/PSU.aspx?pn=5D67F0CF-C6AC-498F-8FD5-0E8FFE34F021
JG forums discussion: http://www.jonnyguru.com/forums/showthread.php?14041-EVGA-450GD-550GD-650GD
 

NightHawkRMX

Illustrious
https://pcpartpicker.com/product/vHhmP6/evga-gd-2019-500-w-80-gold-certified-atx-power-supply-100-gd-0500-v1

Im talking about the 2019 models which come in 500 600 and 700w varients. They are readily available in the us.



Finding reviews for the newer ones are even more impossible.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
And THAT, usually tells you one of two things. Either they are too new for anybody to have reviewed them yet, or they are not a model that the manufacturer is proud enough of to send out review samples of them because they don't want the bad feedback they know they are going to recieve going mainstream public because when Aris or Oklahoma Wolf, or another PSU reviewer says "this unit is not good", then they might as well just shut down the production line for that model because it's never going to be a high volume seller. Also, if reviewers don't feel the unit is good enough to bother wasting time on for a review, they may abstain from doing a review on it if a sample WAS sent, or decline to spend money on it in order TO review it if no sample was sent.

Other times, well, no, that pretty much covers it.
 

NightHawkRMX

Illustrious
Also, I have a question, is there any reason PSU wattages are what they are.

Most 520/620w units are S12 or M12 based.
The majority of new sub 850w PSUs seem to end in 50 (EX: 550w)
The majority of new PSUs over 850w seem to end in 00 (EX: 1200w)

There are plenty of outliers to the bottom 2 points, but it seems to be true for most.
 

NightHawkRMX

Illustrious
And THAT, usually tells you one of two things. Either they are too new for anybody to have reviewed them yet, or they are not a model that the manufacturer is proud enough of to send out review samples of them because they don't want the bad feedback they know they are going to recieve going mainstream public because when Aris or Oklahoma Wolf, or another PSU reviewer says "this unit is not good", then they might as well just shut down the production line for that model because it's never going to be a high volume seller. Also, if reviewers don't feel the unit is good enough to bother wasting time on for a review, they may abstain from doing a review on it if a sample WAS sent, or decline to spend money on it in order TO review it if no sample was sent.

Other times, well, no, that pretty much covers it.
I think I have seen them for 1-2 months. I'd expect reviews within 1-2 months.

I really hope its not the last one.
 

4745454b

Titan
Moderator
If you keep it cool and you don't ask it to power much of anything you should be ok. But even then it's probably near the end of it's life and it's time for something better. I was just getting ready to replace my Superflower 450W unit. It was a good one but they don't last forever. I used it for 5-7yrs I think I was looking at getting a new one.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
No, they are actually not fine, even without taxing them with high demand gaming cards. Just ask @USAFRet or any of the many others who've posted here in the past about the damage they've caused to other hardware when they ceremoniously die because the caps fail and the protections fail. I've seen plenty of people on this here forum, who were using them in systems with low draw configurations have similar failures. Dead motherboards. Smoke. Screaming. Crying. Fireworks. More screaming. More crying. Dead drives. It has happened many times with those units even when the person had a slot powered card only or no graphics card and a unit that was several hundred watts more than their system could have ever used.

Ok. I might be exaggerating about the screaming and crying. I can't say for sure since I wasn't there. Sounds right though. :)
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
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Green label CX600 killed one of my boards.
Worked fine for quite a while. Putting some mid grade parts together for a house server...poof. No more motherboard.

No screaming and crying...just swearing.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Well, they are better than, say, any of the ones listed as "do not use" on the first post of this thread. They are better than most of what Cooler master and Thermaltake sell other than their premium units. Which are few.

They are ok. They are not something I'd want to pair with a system that uses more than slot power for the graphics card though.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Ebay's guarantee doesn't mean Jack if something damages your system. They won't be replacing your damaged hardware. Seen plenty of people on here put Ebay CPUs in perfectly good motherboards and end up with both a CPU and motherboard that don't work afterwards.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yes, but a good model of PSU sent from a manufacturer will have been tested AND will have adequate protections to make sure nothing DOES get fried. That's the main difference. You know what it means when a manufacturer says "refurbished". You have NO idea what some schmuck in bumfu egypt means by "user refurbished" or if it even means anything at all beyond they blew it out with air.
 

Aeacus

Illustrious
Herald
When it comes to the PSUs, i strictly follow two rules:
  1. Never cheap out on a PSU.
  2. Never buy an used PSU (including refurbished PSU).
Further explanation:
1. If you pay peanuts, you will get monkeys. Meaning that with cheap price, you can not get good quality PSU. And PSU's quality is very important since it powers your entire PC.
Saving $40 on a PSU now can cost you in excess of $1000 when (not if) "budget" PSU blows and fries everything it's connected to. It has happened and it will continue happening to people who are cheaping out on PSUs.
Moreover, when you can afford to buy $250+ GPU, you can afford to hand out additional $40 for good quality PSU as well.

2. With used PSUs, there's no telling what kind of abuse they have seen and if they even operate within specs anymore. Sure, the "manufacturer refurbished" gives a tiny bit of assurance but there is a catch: There is either no warranty or very little of it included with refurbished PSUs. Corsair gives their refurbished PSUs 1 year of warranty. Same with EVGA, only 1 year. Regardless the PSU series in question.
For example: Corsair AX1200i refurbished costs $245 and comes with 1 year of warranty (link), while brand new AX1200i costs $329 and comes with 10 years of warranty (link).

There's another thing to think about. Refurbished PSU means that original purchaser returned the PSU for some reason. If the PSU is solid, why get rid of it? Also, how proud you'd feel if you're using someone else's junk?


By following those two rules above, you'll almost never have any PSU issues, unless you'll get a lemon or DOA. But PSU RMA covers those.
Add good quality UPS to your PC as well (as i've done) and even electricity grid won't give you any troubles (e.g frying your PSU during thunderstorm).
 
Reactions: King_V and clarkjd

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Well, IDK about that last part. I've seen a FEW systems that were connected to a quality UPS that were just too close to a direct strike on the power lines get smoked. So, PSU and MB done, despite UPS. I don't in any wise trust a UPS to protect from a major surge or strike. UPS isn't really there for that anyhow. It's there to make sure if the system shuts down you have time to save what you are doing and not corrupt anything from an instant off.
 

Aeacus

Illustrious
Herald
With components frying during lightning strike - here, i'd look towards electricity grid itself.

1st line of defense: properly installed lightning rod(s)
2nd line: underground power lines (no air lines)
3rd line: up-to-the-date and good quality breakers inside electrical substation and every home as well

With all those in place, everyone's hardware would be safe.
 

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