[SOLVED] POWER SW Cable fried that’s connect to the J2 and case power button

Jun 30, 2019
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Recently I noticed that my PC wasn’t turning on. So I opened it up to find out that the button to my case to turn on my computer was fried. The cables fried were the POWER SW which was connect to the J2 box thing. I’ve been researching on how to turn it on and all I have to do is connect the two prongs from where the power switch cable was. My problem is that how do I take out this wire connected to the J2 spot and install a new one? I tried to order one online but I can’t get my old one out.
 
Jun 30, 2019
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This is the cable I bought and that box part is where the button should go, and that is where my other one fried. But I don't know if it's the right cable or how to put it in because my old one is fried and melted and can't get it off.
 

Satan-IR

Honorable
What are you full specs including make and model of PSU?

Have you been able to actually turn the PC on with shorting/connecting the prongs you mentioned? Does it work?

I'm asking because I'm thinking it would require a big over-voltage/current to make the switch/cables actually melt; unless the melting had another cause?
 
Jun 30, 2019
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What are you full specs including make and model of PSU?

Have you been able to actually turn the PC on with shorting/connecting the prongs you mentioned? Does it work?

I'm asking because I'm thinking it would require a big over-voltage/current to make the switch/cables actually melt; unless the melting had another cause?
Went connecting the prongs it did power on which is good, but obviously, I don't want to do that forever. My whole build is here:

NZXT S340 Mid Tower Case
Intel Core i7-6700k
Radeon RX 480
Gigabyte Micro ATX DDR4
Kingston HyperX FURY Black 8GB Kit
Samsung 850 250GB
WD Blue 1TB SATA
EVGA 500 B1 500W
(built it in 2016)
 

COLGeek

Cybernaut
Moderator
You can either try to remove the damaged power button and replace with what you purchased (assuming it is compatible) or you can rig up the switch and leave hanging where you can access it. All that is needed to connect to the motherboard is to remove the previously damaged header and connect the new header.
 

Satan-IR

Honorable
Went connecting the prongs it did power on which is good, but obviously, I don't want to do that forever. My whole build is here:

NZXT S340 Mid Tower Case
Intel Core i7-6700k
Radeon RX 480
Gigabyte Micro ATX DDR4
Kingston HyperX FURY Black 8GB Kit
Samsung 850 250GB
WD Blue 1TB SATA
EVGA 500 B1 500W
(built it in 2016)

That's good news; just asked to make sure there are no major problems like a PSU failure or such.

Yes obviously the issue has to be rectified as shorting the pins every time is not a viable option.
 
Jun 30, 2019
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You can either try to remove the damaged power button and replace with what you purchased (assuming it is compatible) or you can rig up the switch and leave hanging where you can access it. All that is needed to connect to the motherboard is to remove the previously damaged header and connect the new header.
I'm not sure if the cable bought is correct, but is there a way I can buy the right one depending on the case I bought?
 

Satan-IR

Honorable
As COLGeek said, you should be able to take the old one out.

The Power Reset buttons are momentary switches and they're usually standard shape/size. You might have to open the front panel/bezel of the case to reach it, if you haven't already.

Contacting NXZT is also a good idea if they recommend a certain brand (considering shape/size).
 

NightHawkRMX

Illustrious
Not sure how those pins melted, but its a good thing it powers on.

If you can wiggle loose the connectors from the motherboard, you could try to find a new power button, or you can grab any genaric one and hang it out the front vents in the s340.
 

Satan-IR

Honorable
Well the power button is a very low power hookup, highly ODD it would fry like that.

If it happens again after the fix, u got something else going on in there.
Indeed, that's why I asked whether the system POSTs and actually works.

Now that we know the PSU is a relatively good one and that the system actually works, PSU failure is moot, as I've seen failing low-quality PSUs do all manners of nasty things to motherboards and what connected to them; the uncontrolled current runs through the PCB damaging odd places/pieces.

I agree that it should be looked into beyond just replacing the broken button as to what caused the cable/wire to melt.
 

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