Question Powering a newer 24-pin motherboard with an old 240w PSU? Any adapter?

Happy2Kill

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Jan 8, 2014
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Hi there, I'm looking to power a motherboard and pentium CPU with 4gb of ram that runs off a USB operating system. Extremely low power consumption should make it easy to power and I was wondering if I could use an old 240w PSU from an HP RP5800. It can be found here https://www.amazon.ca/HP-613763-001-Power-supply-unit/dp/B008FQOFXY for reference, but i own 7 of these in working condition but they don't use a 24 pin, they use a 6 pin to power its native motherboard. Is there any form of adapter I could use to make this functional on a newer board? I rather use this if possible than spend $100+ on a new power supply when its double the cost of the rest of the build.
 

ZeroDollarBudget

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Sep 5, 2019
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For such a system, you could get away with a cheaper PSU. You can still get a decent one to suit the build for under $80 depending on where you live. There most likely are adapters but its pointless as that powers supply will not have the voltage requirements as @kerberos_20 said. search "SF Power supply" and there are many reasonable options. Pick one with solid reviews and that specifically says 24 pin.
 
Something around a Z270/Z370, haven't decided which one to use yet. I already own them so I'd prefer to use what I already have. I even have a B85 I would use if I could use this PSU.
HP has proprietary PSUs with 12v rails only to use less power when in idle, all teh 5v and 3.3v rails are built into mainboard (if needed), what u need is standart ATX PSU (or any other form factor with ATX connectors like SFX, TFX, etc ) for ATX mainboard
 

jojesa

Illustrious
Curious, why do I require a 5v and 3.3v rail?
To make it short, the power supply is an AC to DC converter device than delivers 5v & 3.3v (and more) and the motherboard reduce those voltages to accommodate components like CPU, SSD, USB, RAM...which might use .5v and up
The CPU could required from 0.5v to 1.4v (even more ), which is usually defined the processor performance.
So why don't just let PSU delivers 12v and let the motherboard convert to any low voltage required.
Well Converting 12v to 1.2 or 1.5v creates unwanted heat, which is not ideal for PC components.
So it is better to have the PSU handle the 12v to lower voltage conversion, since it could have a fan and heat sinks to dissipate the heat

I suggest you get a $30-40 350-400W ATX PSU
You could find units from Antec, EVGA, etc.
 
To make it short, the power supply is an AC to DC converter device than delivers 5v & 3.3v (and more) and the motherboard reduce those voltages to accommodate components like CPU, SSD, USB, RAM...which might use .5v and up
The CPU could required from 0.5v to 1.4v (even more ), which is usually defined the processor performance.
So why don't just let PSU delivers 12v and let the motherboard convert to any low voltage required.
Well Converting 12v to 1.2 or 1.5v creates unwanted heat, which is not ideal for PC components.
So it is better to have the PSU handle the 12v to lower voltage conversion, since it could have a fan and heat sinks to dissipate the heat

I suggest you get a $30-40 350-400W ATX PSU
You could find units from Antec, EVGA, etc.
most of OEMs using 12v only for reducing wattage, as using AC-DC 5V/3.3v all time isnt really great idea :p
so they go DC-DC 12 to 5/3.3 with mainboard components when needed, this reduces price on PSU, increases price on mainboard, but overally reduces wattage of system (watt = waste heat from energy, energy = joule)
 

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