Sep 20, 2021
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I have a Tenda PH6 AV1000 that I recently bought to extend the ethernet range of my house, though after a few outlets from the receiving adapter the adapters aren't detecting one another.
Anyone have a solution?
 
Sep 16, 2021
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If your Wi-Fi doesn't reach a room or another building on the same electrical meter, this adapter is the easiest way to push your internet signal in these spots. All you need to do is to plug one adapter into the wall receptacle and connect it to your modem with a supplied Ethernet cable. Another adapter you plug into the wall receptacle in your other room and connect it with the computer in that room. Push the buttons on both adapters and they start talking. My speed went from 1 Mbps to 16 Mbps in the room upstairs from the modem.
 
It is strange there is not much you can set or change on these devices.

I would first take the cheapest power strip you can find. Key here is no surge protection between outlets. Plug both into the strip and see if you can get them to pair.
 
Sep 20, 2021
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It is strange there is not much you can set or change on these devices.

I would first take the cheapest power strip you can find. Key here is no surge protection between outlets. Plug both into the strip and see if you can get them to pair.
I managed to pair them before, though they only work on one circuit which is kind of odd for a powerline adapter. It might be because of the signal losing power during the loop to the other adapter but do you have an idea on how to solve this?
 
Sep 20, 2021
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If your Wi-Fi doesn't reach a room or another building on the same electrical meter, this adapter is the easiest way to push your internet signal in these spots. All you need to do is to plug one adapter into the wall receptacle and connect it to your modem with a supplied Ethernet cable. Another adapter you plug into the wall receptacle in your other room and connect it with the computer in that room. Push the buttons on both adapters and they start talking. My speed went from 1 Mbps to 16 Mbps in the room upstairs from the modem.
Well, yea I am aware of that fact. But the fact that the device doesn't work in a small range in the same building with circuits connecting to one breaker is confusing to me. Do you have an idea on how I can fix this?
 
There are no setting on those devices other than maybe changing the encryption keys. They are either going to work or they are not. It almost seems these are defective units.

These devices are using the newest technology and have much less issues going between circuits. They are using all three leads including the ground which is all connected together.

Make very sure you have these plugged directly into the wall outlets no extensions or surge protectors. Try to unplug as much as you can in your house to see if something is interfering. Things with motors tend to be the worst offenders. You could try to turn off all the breakers except the 2 that the power line device are connected to.
The other thing that people have complained about is the very new arc fault breakers required in new houses. Some brands of these completely block the signals used by powerline adapters.
 

gggplaya

Distinguished
Are you sure those devices are on the same breaker?? How do you know, even outlets in the same room can be on different breakers? Did you test the outlets by disconnecting the breaker and checking to see if they still had power?

Do you mean breaker panel and not individual breakers? A breaker panel in the U.S. has 2 nodes in it. Both nodes are 120v and combine to make 240v. You can move individual breakers around the breaker panel to get them on the same node.
 
Sep 20, 2021
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Are you sure those devices are on the same breaker?? How do you know, even outlets in the same room can be on different breakers? Did you test the outlets by disconnecting the breaker and checking to see if they still had power?

Do you mean breaker panel and not individual breakers? A breaker panel in the U.S. has 2 nodes in it. Both nodes are 120v and combine to make 240v. You can move individual breakers around the breaker panel to get them on the same node.
Thank you for the tip! I'll go try it out, and I have checked the outlets etc and I just didn't knew it had to be connected to 1 breaker rather than the box. I do not live in the US but thanks for the heads up!
 
Sep 20, 2021
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Are you sure those devices are on the same breaker?? How do you know, even outlets in the same room can be on different breakers? Did you test the outlets by disconnecting the breaker and checking to see if they still had power?

Do you mean breaker panel and not individual breakers? A breaker panel in the U.S. has 2 nodes in it. Both nodes are 120v and combine to make 240v. You can move individual breakers around the breaker panel to get them on the same node.
I don't work on electricity or anything related with wiring but I do want to learn more about it. Can you please provide me with an article or even a guide to help me? Thank you! Your help is much appreciated!
 

gggplaya

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It really depends on the type of electrical system you have in your house. 120/240 double pole systems are common in North and Central America, as well as some Caribbean nations.

Most other countries are single pole 230v systems. In this case, if you live in a 230v country, then being on the same breaker panel should have connectivity.

There are also some newer houses or breakers that use ARC fault breakers which can suppress powerline adapters as well.
 

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