Question Powerline adapter slows down after a few minutes of working perfectly

Aug 18, 2020
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Recently I bought a D-link DHP-W611AV powerline adapter that seemed to work perfectly (reaching 50Mbps, which is the speed of my connection, with ~5ms ping to the modem) when I first set it up. However, after around 10 minutes it slowed down dramatically, with ping of around 50-200 ms and speeds only up to 3-4 Mbps . After turning it off and on again it started working normally again, but again after a few minutes the same thing happened. I've tried plugging the receiver in other rooms and get the same result: it works for 10 minutes and then it gets very slow. How is this explained? If there was interference/there was something wrong with poor wiring in the house shouldn't the adapter not work at all, or just be slow all the time? It really troubles me that it works so good for the first few minutes whenever I turn it off and on again, no matter what devices are on in the house or where I plug it in (it even works in power strips).

Any further troubleshooting ideas? I have experimented a lot with different plugs in different rooms, etc, but it just doesn't seem to work consistently for a long time. Should I just return the powerline back?
 
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Powerlines can be really fickle. I would return them and try another brand and see what happens.

Also to test them, plug two of them into a power strip where they are basically communicating with just each other. See if you can get your full 50Mbps by connecting to one of them and connecting the other of them to the router.
 
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ex_bubblehead

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....Also to test them, plug two of them into a power strip where they are basically communicating with just each other....
There's a reason that the documentation for all of these devices very specifically state not to do this. Please stop and think before giving unsound advice.

These devices have to be on the same circuit to work properly. This means that the signal should not be routed through a power panel and breakers. For testing purposes you should be able to plug into recepticles on opposite sides of the same room.
 
There's a reason that the documentation for all of these devices very specifically state not to do this. Please stop and think before giving unsound advice.

These devices have to be on the same circuit to work properly. This means that the signal should not be routed through a power panel and breakers. For testing purposes you should be able to plug into recepticles on opposite sides of the same room.
This is very sound advice for testing. By plugging both into a surge strip, you isolate both onto a local power strip thereby removing any and all interference. It is akin to testing a wireless bridge in a single room. Unless you understand what is being recommended do not deem it as unsound advice.

Opposite side of the same room is not a valid test since it can still have mixed results. This is bad advice. You would know this if you've had to try to diagnose powerline issues before, which I have at over 6 sites, 2 of them being commercial. Just because 2 outlets are in a room doesn't mean they are on the same circuit.
 
I've had bad results plugging one/both units into a power strip / surge protector.

Not sure if that's a real thing, but I avoid it.
If you plug one into a surge strip for usage, then yes this will be an issue as the surge strip will filter the 'noise' the powerline uses for communication.

If you've plugged both units in two different locations into a surge strip, I'm surprised you're even getting a connection as now the problem is multiplied times two.

This is NOT what I am suggesting to do. Plug both in the SAME strip so that they are literally on the same power strip. This gives them a 'direct connection' to each other for testing purposes.
 
This is where it depends on the exact device a simple power strip with no surge protection between the outlets is a good test. A actual surge protector that may have protection between the outlets may not work.
ime, most power surge strips only have protection circuitry on the power as it comes in, not isolation between the different outlets. Only the real expensive/nice ones will isolate each outlet.
 

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