Question Powerline network interference

Jun 23, 2020
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Hello tonight i want to share with you a problem that torments me the last 3 years. Sorry for the long sheet but to understand the problem i think i have to explain the situation.
I live in a house that consists of 3 floors. The modem is located on the 1st floor so powerline adapters were my solution to have internet access to the rooms i needed. The adapters that i use are made by TP-Link, and the models are TL-PA8010P(used on 1st &2nd) and TL-PA2010(used on 3rd). On the 1st and 2nd floor all adapters work without any problems. On the 3rd floor the signal slightly exceeds the distance length supported by the adapters, so sometimes a connection is available, and other times not. So to solve this instability i thought to route a long ethernet cable to the 3rd floor. That was fine for 1 device at the beginning, but later i needed to add some other devices so i thought of making another powerline network up there. The routed ethernet connects to a "source" poweline adapter, and a 2nd one is used as a "receiver" that is connected to a modem used as a wi-fi repeater. So basically there are two different networks in "one" home. The problem starts here. As stated before the 3rd floor is barely within the limit of the signal length of the adapter plugged in the 1st. The result of this is that the network on the 3rd floor still isn't stable. The 2 adapters lose connection between them. Probably because one of them tried to connect with the other network. The only solution i've found is to unplug and replug the "source". But after some hours or days the same thing happens again. I have tried pairing the 2 latter adapters only together, separately from the others but the problem persists. I can live with that but it's kind of annoying.
Any of you have any idea of how this problem can be solved? Thank you very much in advance.
 
So one of the biggest sources of problem is that you're using two vastly different types of powerline standards. You want to be consistent and for best performance, you want the newest one you can get--in your case av1200.

Also, you have two different powerline networks, which is bad too. You can use the configuration utility to make two separate networks, which may help or even solve the issue.

If you have a long cord all the way up to the 3rd floor, you can simply use a regular switch or modem as a switch/repeater like you have done. I would NOT put a second 'source' powerline up there by connecting it to the wired connection as that will cause network loops.

Ideally you will run ethernet where you can and then connect the 'source' powerline to the most central location and 'receiver' ones where you need them.
 
Reactions: Aroulis
You only can have 1 powerline network in the house. If you attempt to run 2 different ones they will interfere with each other...kinda like how wifi from your neighbor does.

I suspect your problems are you are attempting to use the extremely old av200 based unit. Ignoring that even though they say powerline can be mix and match it doesn't work well. The av200 units in general have coverage issues. If you got more av1200 units I suspect it will work better. Try to move the unit form the 2nd floor to the 3rd to be sure they work before you buy any more.
 
Reactions: Aroulis and SamirD
Jun 23, 2020
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Thanks for replying. I do have 2 extra av1200. I forgot to say that on the 3rd floor i want internet connection on different rooms. And that is the reason i chose to use a second powerline network instead of drilling the walls and use ethernet. Since the wire i routed is in a bedroom i dont think it's the best idea to place a modem there. As you both said two networks aren't the best thing in the same house so i suppose the way to go is to drill walls and change the location of the 2nd modem. 😕
 
Jun 23, 2020
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So one of the biggest sources of problem is that you're using two vastly different types of powerline standards. You want to be consistent and for best performance, you want the newest one you can get--in your case av1200.

Also, you have two different powerline networks, which is bad too. You can use the configuration utility to make two separate networks, which may help or even solve the issue.

If you have a long cord all the way up to the 3rd floor, you can simply use a regular switch or modem as a switch/repeater like you have done. I would NOT put a second 'source' powerline up there by connecting it to the wired connection as that will cause network loops.

Ideally you will run ethernet where you can and then connect the 'source' powerline to the most central location and 'receiver' ones where you need them.
You only can have 1 powerline network in the house. If you attempt to run 2 different ones they will interfere with each other...kinda like how wifi from your neighbor does.

I suspect your problems are you are attempting to use the extremely old av200 based unit. Ignoring that even though they say powerline can be mix and match it doesn't work well. The av200 units in general have coverage issues. If you got more av1200 units I suspect it will work better. Try to move the unit form the 2nd floor to the 3rd to be sure they work before you buy any more.
I come back with an update. I've checked with the provided utility the network for other devices, and while on the 2nd floor multiple ones show up, on the 3rd only the 2 i have are shown. That means that we cross out the interference problem and the problem is between the 2?
Again thanks in advance.
 
I come back with an update. I've checked with the provided utility the network for other devices, and while on the 2nd floor multiple ones show up, on the 3rd only the 2 i have are shown. That means that we cross out the interference problem and the problem is between the 2?
Again thanks in advance.
The utility shows the network configurations, but not how they're using the power frequencies--they are still interfering.

Also, I'm not sure why you are thinking you have to change any wiring--just use all av1200 and unplug the av200 units and that should fix it.
 
Jul 7, 2020
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Add ferrite clamps to fans, heaters and fridges. Also any large power switching devices as they all create noise. I have done this and increased powerline speed by 5 times. Use extension leads where possible and add clamps next to the device for maximum attenuation
 

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