Primary HDD to new primary M.2

Prank855

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I'm planning on building a PC that uses a M.2 SSD as its primary drive, but I want to get the bare bones of the PC first so I'll be getting an HDD first. In the future once I get my M.2 SSD, how could I swap the contents of my HDD to the new SSD, and also making it the new boot drive and the HDD a secondary? This is all for future reference, and I haven't seen any posts with this exact problem. If you know how to do it let me know!
 

USAFRet

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For a basic cloning operation, this...

Specific steps for a successful clone operation:
-----------------------------
Verify the actual used space on the current drive is significantly below the size of the new SSD
Download and install Macrium Reflect (or Samsung Data Migration, if a Samsung SSD)
Power off
Disconnect ALL drives except the current C and the new SSD
Power up
Run the Macrium Reflect (or Samsung Data Migration)
Select ALL the partitions on the existing C drive
Click the 'Clone' button
Wait until it is done
When it finishes, power off
Disconnect ALL drives except for the new SSD
This is to allow the system to try to boot from ONLY the SSD
Swap the SATA cables around so that the new drive is connected to the same SATA port as the old drive
Power up, and verify the BIOS boot order
If good, continue the power up

It should boot from the new drive, just like the old drive.
Maybe reboot a time or two, just to make sure.

If it works, and it should, all is good.

Later, reconnect the old drive and wipe as necessary.
Delete the 450MB Recovery Partition, here:
https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/windows/en-US/4f1b84ac-b193-40e3-943a-f45d52e23685/cant-delete-extra-healthy-recovery-partitions-and-healthy-efi-system-partition?forum=w8itproinstall
-----------------------------


There may be extra considerations going from a SATA drive (the HDD) to an NVMe drive.
 

USAFRet

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That would generally be a basic clone operation.
But, you'll need to be diligent as to the consumed space you get on the HDD. Too much, and you can't clone it to the new SSD.

It is much, much easier to start with the right drive, rather than swap later. Especially if you know you're going to do this swap.
 

Prank855

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I want to buy the HDD first because the SSD I'm looking at is nearly $400 (Samsung 970 Evo 1TB). I'd rather just settle for the HDD first, buy GPU/Monitor, then get the SSD.
 

USAFRet

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What is the full (proposed) parts list of this?
 

Prank855

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https://pcpartpicker.com/user/prankster855/saved/6rv8K8

Still changing a few things around, but it is the general idea of what I am going for.
 

USAFRet

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whoa...
I would do a couple of things.
Drop the NVMe drive to 500GB.
Hold off on the $500 worth of mouse and kbd, or the $350 headphones. Get that later.

Get the NVMe drive first.

Changing from HDD to SATA III SSD is easy.
Changing from HDD to NVMe is a bit trickier.
 

Prank855

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Of course, I was holding off the KB/M and the pair of headphone for later.

Personally, I want a large SSD size since I'd prefer to use one primary drive at all times and only using a secondary when necessary.

To me, the value of the 500 GB/1 TB SSD seems the same, so I don't mind paying double, for exactly double the storage.

I mainly use UserBenchmark to compare things, but if I'm really missing something from not getting and starting with a 500 GB SSD, I'd definitely reconsider.
 

USAFRet

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Personally, I consider userbenchmark.com to be a waste of electrons.

All we're saying is that what you seek can be done, just that it is much easier to start with the NVMe drive, rather than to try to switch later.

That drive is a good one, either 500GB or 1TB.
 

USAFRet

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For a basic cloning operation, this...

Specific steps for a successful clone operation:
-----------------------------
Verify the actual used space on the current drive is significantly below the size of the new SSD
Download and install Macrium Reflect (or Samsung Data Migration, if a Samsung SSD)
Power off
Disconnect ALL drives except the current C and the new SSD
Power up
Run the Macrium Reflect (or Samsung Data Migration)
Select ALL the partitions on the existing C drive
Click the 'Clone' button
Wait until it is done
When it finishes, power off
Disconnect ALL drives except for the new SSD
This is to allow the system to try to boot from ONLY the SSD
Swap the SATA cables around so that the new drive is connected to the same SATA port as the old drive
Power up, and verify the BIOS boot order
If good, continue the power up

It should boot from the new drive, just like the old drive.
Maybe reboot a time or two, just to make sure.

If it works, and it should, all is good.

Later, reconnect the old drive and wipe as necessary.
Delete the 450MB Recovery Partition, here:
https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/windows/en-US/4f1b84ac-b193-40e3-943a-f45d52e23685/cant-delete-extra-healthy-recovery-partitions-and-healthy-efi-system-partition?forum=w8itproinstall
-----------------------------


There may be extra considerations going from a SATA drive (the HDD) to an NVMe drive.
 
Hey,
You should specify if it's going to be an AMD X470 motherboard or recent Intel motherboard because they have different options for using M.2 as cache/hybrid drives in addition to the normal M.2 as a standalone drive.

AMD's STOREMI combines both drives though I think you can add the M.2 SSD later... and since it monitors usage and moves based on the more frequently accessed data you can get away with less space on the SSD.

Depending on use case I might consider this for AMD X470:

1) 256GB M.2 SSD, plus
2) 2TB+ HDD

(combined as a hybrid drive with STOREMI) then

3) later add another M.2 or 2.5" SSD/HDD as needed
 
1) STOREMI (i.e. 256GB M.2 SSD + 2TB 3.5" HDD) https://www.fudzilla.com/news/pc-hardware/46145-amd-storemi-works-like-a-charm-on-x470-chipset-motherboards

2) INTEL (recent): OPTANE as cache (I believe that's only up to 64GB... it copies over frequently used data unlike AMD's solution which does not. It's moved so backup needs to be thought through for STOREMI)

3) Normal way:
a) M.2 SSD for Windows/apps/some games, and
b) HDD for more games/storage/backup of OS Image etc.

*So again I think you can add the M.2 SSD later for both Intel and AMD's solutions... if you go with the "normal" way of the OS on its own M.2 SSD then when installing WINDOWS to the HDD I'd create a partition that matches the SSD size you plan to get such as 200GB if buying a 256GB SSD later so you can just CLONE over that first partition (Windows) from the HDD and leave the games etc on the 2nd partition... then just DELETE that first partition once you tested that the SSD works.

 
Okay, I just noticed its an INTEL build... probably want to stick with the NORMAL solution and just partition the HDD when installing Windows so again you can CLONE that first partition to the SSD later.

Why not just get a 256GB M.2 SSD now then add another later?

You've got 2x M.2 slots though I don't think you'll see noticeable differences between fast M.2 and good 2.5" SSD's unless you've got some specific use case that benefits (not normal use... possibly some video editing scenarios).

quick build points:
1) CPU COOLER is really *(poor) for a build like that.

2) Recommend 2x8GB 3200MHz DDR4 (not 4x4GB 2400MHz) as there are times 3200MHz benefits

3) 2.5" HDD? 500GB? (Not sure why not 3.5", plus 500GB isn't very much if you plan to make a backup IMAGE)

4) Mini GTX1080? (it will be louder than a larger model with better cooler and you should have sufficient SPACE for a larger model so why this one?)


I'll make a build too. Feel free to ignore it. (sorry if I'm a bit behind but several posts have come after I spent time creating a reply)
 

Prank855

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Most of the stuff in the part list is just whatever is cheapest according to the filter I've set.
I agreee the cooler isn't great, I'll probably swap it to a 212 Evo or an AIO.
I meant to set the ram to 4x4 3200mhz, so my bad on that part, but is that worse than 2x8 3200mhz?
The HDD is there for temporary usage, just so I have something before I get the NVMe SSD.
The 1080 model isn't much of a concern, and of course, is just set by the filter.

 
THIS BUILD is closer to what I'd personally do with about $4000CDN to spend. Let me break it down.
https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/list/MnTmxG

1) EVO is not sufficient (may work but it would probably be pretty noisy under heavy load with the i7-8700)… I added the i7-8700K since the total build cost is high already so why not squeeze out that little more performance? Otherwise I'd consider going AMD AM4.


*That NOCTUA NH-D15S is a placeholder since you seem to want a windowed case so the color isn't great. I just know it can handle the i7-8700K at 5GHz and very few air coolers can... there is a new Noctua cooler with a black fan though I don't think its out yet.

2) 4x4GB is not a good idea. There's then no room to expand and no need for it anyway. Stick with 2x8GB.

3) I dropped the M.2 SSD down to 256GB in my build just to free up cash for the better cooler, case, HDD but again my build is an example.

4) GTX1080... ah, just note that while that "mini" is cheaper it likely will throttle down much easier than a good cooler solution

5) 1920x1080, 240Hz and not GSYNC?

First that's a bit low-res so unless you absolutely are a "twitch" shooter that can feel more than 165FPS I wouldn't even consider that. I strongly recommend something like THESE specs:

- GSYNC, IPS, 2560x1440, 144Hz

*With GSYNC the monitor matches the FPS output (for NVidia cards) so it's far, far less hassle to mess around with game settings since you aren't concerned with VSYNC. With a 240Hz monitor you'll rarely hit 240FPS so you're probably going to stick with VSYNC OFF which can cause screen tearing (though it's not clear how obvious that is at 240Hz).




Sorry if I made this too confusing.




 
https://noctua.at/en/noctua-at-computex-2018

Okay so the BLACK versions of their good air coolers are apparently late 2018 or early 2019. Oh well. The Noctua NH-D15S has a single fan so one option (not ideal) is to replace it later with a new black one.

I really hate liquid coolers so options are limited if you want to both cool and have it be fairly QUIET a high-end CPU.

If you aren't committed to INTEL then I'd go with something like:
a) R7-2700X (use its own cooler for now and see how that goes), and
b) AMD X470 motherboard
c) 2x8GB 3200MHz CL15 or CL16 DDR4

Then I'd possibly go with this as a "hybrid" drive with AMD's STOREMI (needs X470):

(M.2 256GB) + (3TB HDD)

The most frequently accessed stuff migrates over to the M.2 SSD (STOREMI by default supports up to 256GB for the SSD part though you can pay for an upgrade I believe).

There are pros and cons with the i7-8700K (6-cores but faster) and R7-2700X (eight cores slightly slower)… if you go with the i7-8700 (non-K) then your per-core is closer to the R7-2700X so I personally would be going with the AMD solution.... I don't think (could be wrong) you can manually set all cores on the i7-8700 to its max turbo of 4.6GHz so I think under heavy load it is closer to 4.3GHz whereas 99% of the i7-8700K's (with good cooler, mobo, power supply) can maintain 5GHz.

The i7-8700K mostly matters (IMO at least) for 1080p gaming. I don't game at 1080p using my GTX1080 I game at 2560x1440 where the bottleneck tends to shift more towards the GPU so the i7-8700K higher perf-per-core matters less.

In reality both solutions are great and most people should see little difference, though I do like the fact that AM4 platform should hang around a lot longer.... even something like replacing the MOTHERBOARD is likely to be much easier in a few years (after Warranty) with AM4 since the Intel solution is likely to fade away far quicker.
 

Aragorn

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The machine will be FAR slower with just a HDD! The SSD will be a night and day difference in almost any task (web browsing not so much, once the browser loads)
 

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