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[SOLVED] Problem CPU 100° C after clean PC

Jul 8, 2020
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Hello, it is the first time that I post here.

I bought the PC in 2016, these are my components:
I will summarize the steps that I have done:
  • Open the PC
  • Clean all the dust from inside, the fans and the radiator cooler
  • Change the thermal paste using the center point method
  • Clean the bios cmos
  • Update bios version (same config as before)
  • Install windows 10 and all drivers
  • All fans work correctly
After open Windows and starting to browse or whatever the CPU gets very hot near 90 - 100 ° C and the computer slows down a lot.

This happened to me once a few months ago but it solved itself but it seems now permanent.

When the computer is on and I touch the two pipes that go from the heatsink to the radiator, one is cold and the other hot.

I have tried to change the thermal paste again, put windows in economic mode and nothing.



I wonder if the problem is in the cooling or in the CPU itself.

Thank you very much in advance!
 
Last edited:

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
davidgaroro,

On behalf of Tom's Moderator Team, welcome aboard!

You have a flow problem due to a blockage, which is typical for a 4 years old unit. Many AIOs fail well within that time frame. It's very likely that the blockage occurred when you placed your case on its side for cleaning.

Apart from the potential for a coolant leak, there are several problems common to AIOs: Here's some information you should know about AIOs, but pay particular attention to the double red bullets:

• All AIOs will eventually fail. It’s not a question of if; it’s a question of when. Pumps can have component failures in the stator electronics that drive the impeller, which is a moving part that can wear, so those which run 24/7/365 are prone to premature failure. AIO units are notorious for failures due to inferior pump quality, whereas custom loops typically use high-end pumps which have greater longevity.

• Coolant can slowly evaporate over time due to "permeation". However unlikely it may seem, coolant can actually dissipate directly through the tubes. This can introduce bubbles into the impeller chamber causing "cavitation", whereby coolant flow is impeded or interrupted.

• AIOs are sealed Closed Loop Coolers (CLC), which unlike custom loops, are not designed to be disassembled for the water block and impeller to be flushed, cleaned of bio-contaminants and radiator sediments, then refilled. Even AIOs that have an effective biocide additive gradually accumulate bio-growth over time, which will eventually clog the micro channels in the water block, as well as the radiator cooling tubes, thereby reducing flow and thermal efficiency. This is evidenced by Core temperatures that slowly increase by several degrees over periods of several months to a few years.

• Also unlike custom loops, AIOs use dissimilar metals (aluminum radiator / copper water block). This causes galvanic corrosion which produces sediments that accumulate over time, resulting in blockages and flow problems. Even new AIOs may contain radiator sediments due to inadequate flushing after manufacturing. Experienced builders of custom loops will always thoroughly flush brand-new radiators. Flux, solder and metal fragments are typically found in the flush water when it's poured through a strainer.

• • For no apparent reason ... OR ... by simply installing, moving, tipping, handling or otherwise disturbing a NEW OR OLD unit, particles can become dislodged, whereupon the next power-up, the now free-floating particles can circulate into the impeller chamber and tubes thereby constricting or completely stopping coolant flow. Since the impeller is magnetically coupled to the stator (no direct shaft), the unit may "appear" that it's running while no actual flow is present. "Hearing" the unit running or "feeling" vibration can be deceiving as it does not necessarily indicate flow, nor does Pump RPM in BIOS or various software utilities. Moreover, as fan vibration can "telegraph" throughout the entire AIO unit, it's often mistaken for pump vibration.

• Without an actual in-line sensor or indicator, proper flow is difficult to confirm. Under normal operation, even with the CPU at 100% workload, there should be only a minimal temperature differential between the tubes. However, if one tube is hot while the other is cool, or the water block is hot while the radiator is cool, it indicates little to no flow. Surface temperatures can be verified with an infrared (IR) thermometer.

Since your AIO is 4 years old, it's highly likely that bio-contaminants and particles from galvanic corrosion are now impeding coolant flow. As your Enermax warranty is most likely expired, you'll need to purchase a replacement cooler. In the interim, a backup air cooler will keep your rig up and running.

Once again, welcome aboard!

CT :sol:
 

Rogue Leader

It's a trap!
Moderator
Sounds like your pump failed or there is a blockage or air bubble (though an air bubble should have worked its way out). First pick the system up (turned off) and move it around up down flip over, etc so if theres an air bubble loged it can move out. Then when you turn it on can you feel or hear the pump running (the CPU block)? Check and make sure you didn't pull the power wire by accident. See what happens after that.
 
Reactions: davidgaroro

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
If the liquid cooler was working properly, flow would be too fast for the two pipes to have a significant temperature difference: at 1L/min (under 0.3 gal/min), the temperature rise through the block should be less than 2C at 100W.

You have a flow issue of some sort, could be loss of coolant through osmosis, in which case the intermittent functionality could be caused by the pump stalling when it ingests air or air-locking greatly increasing the amount of work the pump needs to do to push coolant when the coolant path isn't fully submerged.
 
Reactions: davidgaroro
Jul 8, 2020
7
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This is in 5 min only windows desktop



Sounds like your pump failed or there is a blockage or air bubble (though an air bubble should have worked its way out). First pick the system up (turned off) and move it around up down flip over, etc so if theres an air bubble loged it can move out. Then when you turn it on can you feel or hear the pump running (the CPU block)? Check and make sure you didn't pull the power wire by accident. See what happens after that.
I just shook the computer in all directions because of the bubble but it seems like nothing.
 

Rogue Leader

It's a trap!
Moderator
This is in 5 min only windows desktop





I just shook the computer in all directions because of the bubble but it seems like nothing.
Then bubble isn't your problem, your pump is likely not working. Check its power wiring first make sure all connected, feel the pump see if you feel it, or try to listen to it as well you should hear it whirring.

These are not serviceable, so if its powered and not running, time for a new one.
 
Reactions: davidgaroro

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
davidgaroro,

On behalf of Tom's Moderator Team, welcome aboard!

You have a flow problem due to a blockage, which is typical for a 4 years old unit. Many AIOs fail well within that time frame. It's very likely that the blockage occurred when you placed your case on its side for cleaning.

Apart from the potential for a coolant leak, there are several problems common to AIOs: Here's some information you should know about AIOs, but pay particular attention to the double red bullets:

• All AIOs will eventually fail. It’s not a question of if; it’s a question of when. Pumps can have component failures in the stator electronics that drive the impeller, which is a moving part that can wear, so those which run 24/7/365 are prone to premature failure. AIO units are notorious for failures due to inferior pump quality, whereas custom loops typically use high-end pumps which have greater longevity.

• Coolant can slowly evaporate over time due to "permeation". However unlikely it may seem, coolant can actually dissipate directly through the tubes. This can introduce bubbles into the impeller chamber causing "cavitation", whereby coolant flow is impeded or interrupted.

• AIOs are sealed Closed Loop Coolers (CLC), which unlike custom loops, are not designed to be disassembled for the water block and impeller to be flushed, cleaned of bio-contaminants and radiator sediments, then refilled. Even AIOs that have an effective biocide additive gradually accumulate bio-growth over time, which will eventually clog the micro channels in the water block, as well as the radiator cooling tubes, thereby reducing flow and thermal efficiency. This is evidenced by Core temperatures that slowly increase by several degrees over periods of several months to a few years.

• Also unlike custom loops, AIOs use dissimilar metals (aluminum radiator / copper water block). This causes galvanic corrosion which produces sediments that accumulate over time, resulting in blockages and flow problems. Even new AIOs may contain radiator sediments due to inadequate flushing after manufacturing. Experienced builders of custom loops will always thoroughly flush brand-new radiators. Flux, solder and metal fragments are typically found in the flush water when it's poured through a strainer.

• • For no apparent reason ... OR ... by simply installing, moving, tipping, handling or otherwise disturbing a NEW OR OLD unit, particles can become dislodged, whereupon the next power-up, the now free-floating particles can circulate into the impeller chamber and tubes thereby constricting or completely stopping coolant flow. Since the impeller is magnetically coupled to the stator (no direct shaft), the unit may "appear" that it's running while no actual flow is present. "Hearing" the unit running or "feeling" vibration can be deceiving as it does not necessarily indicate flow, nor does Pump RPM in BIOS or various software utilities. Moreover, as fan vibration can "telegraph" throughout the entire AIO unit, it's often mistaken for pump vibration.

• Without an actual in-line sensor or indicator, proper flow is difficult to confirm. Under normal operation, even with the CPU at 100% workload, there should be only a minimal temperature differential between the tubes. However, if one tube is hot while the other is cool, or the water block is hot while the radiator is cool, it indicates little to no flow. Surface temperatures can be verified with an infrared (IR) thermometer.

Since your AIO is 4 years old, it's highly likely that bio-contaminants and particles from galvanic corrosion are now impeding coolant flow. As your Enermax warranty is most likely expired, you'll need to purchase a replacement cooler. In the interim, a backup air cooler will keep your rig up and running.

Once again, welcome aboard!

CT :sol:
 
Jul 8, 2020
7
0
10
0
Then bubble isn't your problem, your pump is likely not working. Check its power wiring first make sure all connected, feel the pump see if you feel it, or try to listen to it as well you should hear it whirring.

These are not serviceable, so if its powered and not running, time for a new one.
I have checked the cables and they are well connected. The pump makes some noises but not very loud. And when the cpu was at 100 ° the radiator was cold.

davidgaroro,

On behalf of Tom's Moderator Team, welcome aboard!

You have a flow problem due to a blockage, which is typical for a 4 years old unit. Many AIOs fail well within that time frame. It's very likely that the blockage occurred when you placed your case on its side for cleaning.

Apart from the potential for a coolant leak, there are several problems common to AIOs: Here's some information you should know about AIOs, but pay particular attention to the double red bullets:

• All AIOs will eventually fail. It’s not a question of if; it’s a question of when. Pumps can have component failures in the stator electronics that drive the impeller, which is a moving part that can wear, so those which run 24/7/365 are prone to premature failure. AIO units are notorious for failures due to inferior pump quality, whereas custom loops typically use high-end pumps which have greater longevity.

• Coolant can slowly evaporate over time due to "permeation". However unlikely it may seem, coolant can actually dissipate directly through the tubes. This can introduce bubbles into the impeller chamber causing "cavitation", whereby coolant flow is impeded or interrupted.

• AIOs are sealed Closed Loop Coolers (CLC), which unlike custom loops, are not designed to be disassembled for the water block and impeller to be flushed, cleaned of bio-contaminants and radiator sediments, then refilled. Even AIOs that have an effective biocide additive gradually accumulate bio-growth over time, which will eventually clog the micro channels in the water block, as well as the radiator cooling tubes, thereby reducing flow and thermal efficiency. This is evidenced by Core temperatures that slowly increase by several degrees over periods of several months to a few years.

• Also unlike custom loops, AIOs use dissimilar metals (aluminum radiator / copper water block). This causes galvanic corrosion which produces sediments that accumulate over time, resulting in blockages and flow problems. Even new AIOs may contain radiator sediments due to inadequate flushing after manufacturing. Experienced builders of custom loops will always thoroughly flush brand-new radiators. Flux, solder and metal fragments are typically found in the flush water when it's poured through a strainer.

• • For no apparent reason ... OR ... by simply installing, moving, tipping, handling or otherwise disturbing a NEW OR OLD unit, particles can become dislodged, whereupon the next power-up, the now free-floating particles can circulate into the impeller chamber and tubes thereby constricting or completely stopping coolant flow. Since the impeller is magnetically coupled to the stator (no direct shaft), the unit may "appear" that it's running while no actual flow is present. "Hearing" the unit running or "feeling" vibration can be deceiving as it does not necessarily indicate flow, nor does Pump RPM in BIOS or various software utilities. Moreover, as fan vibration can "telegraph" throughout the entire AIO unit, it's often mistaken for pump vibration.

• Without an actual in-line sensor or indicator, proper flow is difficult to confirm. Under normal operation, even with the CPU at 100% workload, there should be only a minimal temperature differential between the tubes. However, if one tube is hot while the other is cool, or the water block is hot while the radiator is cool, it indicates little to no flow. Surface temperatures can be verified with an infrared (IR) thermometer.

Since your AIO is 4 years old, it's highly likely that bio-contaminants and particles from galvanic corrosion are now impeding coolant flow. As your Enermax warranty is most likely expired, you'll need to purchase a replacement cooler. In the interim, a backup air cooler will keep your rig up and running.

Once again, welcome aboard!

CT :sol:
If your case will accommodate the mounting height of the Noctua NH-D15's sink and fans, I can guarantee you will never suffer another pump failure afterward with it! :)
Wow thank you very much for the help! :)

Just before I started to look at comparisons of air coolers vs AIO. And in the end for reliability reasons I decided on air.

I was looking at Noctua NH D14, D15, D15s, U9S, etc. I have to see how much height I can afford.

The only bad thing is that I inadvertently lifted some pins from the motherboard socket of the cpu. But I have read that with great care and with a pair of tweezers or a credit card I can return the pin to its place then I will download Intel® Processor Diagnostic Tool to check for errors, I hope it does.

Thank you very much with all my heart to all the comments received and to this great community. This afternoon I was not sure what to do and I felt a little lost without help, but now I feel in company and much better.

You made my day. 💙
 
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Jul 8, 2020
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I wouldn't approach the socket pins with anything as unwieldy as a credit card or even tweezers. The pins are extremely delicate so a needle, a strong light, a very steady hand and a surgeon's touch is required.
I think that the credit card is for the pins of the cpu not the socket. Maybe to put them straight. If I do, it will be removing the motherboard from the box, with plenty of light, a magnifying glass to help me and a needle.

Thanks for the advice! :)
 
Jul 8, 2020
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In the end, with all the problems I had, I made some changes to my computer:
  • Noctua NH-D15 (cooler)
  • ROG STRIX Z390-F GAMING (mobo)
  • Intel Core i5-9600KF (I sold my 6700k for 160€)
Now a small noise bug occurs in the PSU when I move the mouse that disappears when I deactivate the c states of the bios but I will make a new post about it.

Thank you very much to all of you who have commented. 💙
 

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