Question Problem with Asus RTX 2060 Super

lucmaiden

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Hi to you,

I wished to upgrade my old 660GTX so I bought this 2060.

I have this card running OK for 3 weeks and about 5 days now I experienced lags playing wolfenstein old blood. Really bad lags, frezzing the game make it impossible to play. Tried Far Cry 5: same issue. Even loading the game was painful, lag at the entry screen. (This was the first game played with my new card, it was perfect).

Drivers are up to-date
Fans are running
I check CPU, MB temps all was OK.
I swap the GPU to another PCIE16: everything was fine. Benchmark it with "Haven" 150 fps OK.
So I susptected the MB, I re-swapped the Card on the PCIE16 that was used before and now all works fine.

I got to tell that I'm running on and old CPU/MB I7-3820 P9X79 Pro MB. With a Corsair AX1200 PSU so the power may be not the case.

I know that my hardware would not unleash all the power of the 2060 but it could not cause a sudent major lag... Or could it be just incompatibles?

Can someone help me with that? I'm affraid that it cause break the GPU or MB...
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
How OLD is that AX1200 PSU? How long has it been "in service"?

Does you motherboard have the MOST recent BIOS version installed?


If there are any steps listed here that you have not already done, it would be advisable to do so if for no other reason than to be able to say you've already done it and eliminate that possibility.



First,

make sure your motherboard has the MOST recent BIOS version installed. If it does not, then update. This solves a high number of issues even in cases where the release that is newer than yours makes no mention of improving graphics card or other hardware compatibility. They do not list every change they have made when they post a new BIOS release.


Second,

go to the product page for your motherboard on the manufacturer website. Download and install the latest driver versions for the chipset, storage controllers, audio and network adapters. Do not skip installing a newer driver just because you think it is not relevant to the problem you are having. The drivers for one device can often affect ALL other devices and a questionable driver release can cause instability in the OS itself. They don't release new drivers just for fun. If there is a new driver release for a component, there is a good reason for it. The same goes for BIOS updates.


IF you have other hardware installed or attached to the system that are not a part of the systems covered by the motherboard drivers, then go to the support page for THAT component and check to see if there are newer drivers available for that as well. If there are, install them.


Third,

Make sure your memory is running at the correct advertised speed in the BIOS. This may require that you set the memory to run at the XMP profile settings. Also, make sure you have the memory installed in the correct slots and that they are running in dual channel which you can check by installing CPU-Z and checking the Memory and SPD tabs. For all modern motherboards that are dual channel memory architectures, from the last ten years at least, if you have two sticks installed they should be in the A2 (Called DDR4_1 on some boards) or B2 (Called DDR4_2 on some boards) which are ALWAYS the SECOND and FOURTH slots over from the CPU socket, counting TOWARDS the edge of the motherboard EXCEPT on boards that only have two memory slots total. In that case, if you have two modules it's not rocket science, but if you have only one, then install it in the A1 or DDR4_1 slot.



The last thing we want to look at,

for now anyhow, is the graphics card drivers. Regardless of whether you "already installed the newest drivers" for your graphics card or not, it is OFTEN a good idea to do a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers. Just installing over the old drivers OR trying to use what Nvidia and AMD consider a clean install is not good enough and does not usually give the same result as using the Display Driver Uninstaller utility. This has a very high success rate and is always worth a shot.


If you have had both Nvidia and AMD cards installed at any point on that operating system then you will want to run the DDU twice. Once for the old card drivers (ie, Nvidia or AMD) and again for the currently installed graphics card drivers (ie, AMD or Nvidia). So if you had an Nvidia card at some point in the past, run it first for Nvidia and then after that is complete, run it again for AMD if you currently have an AMD card installed.



Also, if this is a "no signal detected" or other lack of visual display problem, it is probably a good idea to make sure the problem is not just a bad cable or the wrong cable IF this is a display issue. If it is NOT related to a lack of display signal, then obviously this part is not relevant to your issue.

This happens a lot. Try a different cable or a different TYPE of cable. Sometimes there can be issues with the monitor or card not supporting a specific specification such as HDMI 1.4 vs HDMI 2.0, or even an HDMI output stops working but the Displayport or DVI output still works fine on the graphics card. Always worth checking the cable and trying other cables because cables get run over, bent, bent pins or simply were cheap quality to begin with and something as simple as trying a different cable or different monitor might be all that is required to solve your issue.
 

lucmaiden

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My God, what a reply...

really a big thank you for your great response you are just great.

So answering your question:
PSU is 8 years old.
I have an SSD, 4 HD (5400RPM) and 1 Optical all installed in a Coolermaster HAFX Full tower (8 fans total)
System was never overclocked
Always have one GPU (an old Asus 660 GTX which always worked flawless)
4Go stick of memory (G.sKill) for a total a 16Go
Done a clean install from nvidia utility
BIOS is not the latest, (2013 installed) there is a 2014 available.

I will try BIOS for sure.
Review memory XMP profile

I have another question:
The guy a Asus support chat told me that maybe my MB voltage limitations could damage (or kill) the GPU and the MB... Do you think is could be the case? As I know, the GPU is directly powerd by the PSU so how comes the "voltages limitations" could affect the GPU? That scares me a lot...

And another question/cause: could it be possible that the weight of the card applied on the PCIE16 connector could cause a misconnection leading to poor/no performance of the GPU? Because all I have done is to swap the GPU from one PCIE to another for test (with goog results) and swap it back. And the problem is gone (for now)...
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
My God, what a reply...

really a big thank you for your great response you are just great.
You are welcome. Anytime.

PSU is 8 years old.
Any PSU that is 8 years old is not only suspect, but regardless of how good it was to begin with, in my opinion should be retired to use as a backup in case of emergencies or as the primary unit for a much lower power draw secondary system, even if it is a very good model like the Corsair AX or HX units, or some high end series from Super Flower or Corsair.

BIOS is not the latest, (2013 installed) there is a 2014 available.
I would recommend updating.

I have another question:
The guy a Asus support chat told me that maybe my MB voltage limitations could damage (or kill) the GPU and the MB... Do you think is could be the case? As I know, the GPU is directly powerd by the PSU so how comes the "voltages limitations" could affect the GPU? That scares me a lot...

No, that's doubtful and possibly even impossible. Sounds pretty made up to me and I've never heard anybody suggest such a thing before. Certainly not a common suggestion or piece of advice, that's for sure. I call BS.

And another question/cause: could it be possible that the weight of the card applied on the PCIE16 connector could cause a misconnection leading to poor/no performance of the GPU? Because all I have done is to swap the GPU from one PCIE to another for test (with goog results) and swap it back. And the problem is gone (for now)...
Yes, if it is sagging VERY far or if there is a problem with the slot already being broken. Or if you do not have the end of the card attached to the back of the case IO panel properly with a screw fastening it to the PCI slot IO opening. Otherwise, probably not unless the PCB on the graphics card is somehow broken or cracked.

Now if the card is not correctly and fully installed, anything is possible. Probably not a bad idea to remove and reinstall the graphics card AND if it is sagging pretty badly, getting a GPU support bracket isn't the worst idea ever either. You could even make a home brewed one and there are a variety of ideas for home brewed GPU support brackets online if you search for them.

As to the PSU, this is the MOST likely culprit, given the age of your unit. It is likely that the problems you've had are an early warning sign of impending failure but it could easily be a motherboard issue given the age of your hardware as well.

I'd still target the PSU, FIRST.

 

lucmaiden

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Ok so here I am:
BIOS: Updated
GPU Drivers: Cleaned with DDU (what a soft, loved it!) Clean install to the latest drivers.
Memory: They run in the good XMP Profile with good timings.
PSU: definitively I will find a good soft to test it (I think about Aida64) and look for a change if the problem reoccur.

I will also consider to craft a good stand to support the GPU more stiffly.

I also have some suspiscions about GPU drivers, I remember that I tried to install GPUTweak (from Asus) to do somes tesst on the GPU and it was always crashing. Now after a clean install it run really good. I can test fans and monitor the GPU...

I also tried to install the last AIsuite from Asus and now I think that it might no installed right because I now have 3 peripherals in device manager that have a yellow mark. (USB Controller, PCI peripheric and unknow peripheral) I will correct it. I remember the last time I install this suite, I got those marks. I think that this is not the best tool from asus.



And again thank you for reassure about electrical issues, I think this guy was just out of solutions... I know that with my hardware this GPU will never reach it's limits so it should be quite relax!

For now I will test the GPU with a recent game and I will give you feedback in few days.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
GPU tweak is,.....problematic. I would recommend using Afterburner. It is very stable and works for pretty much ALL graphics cards.

AI suite is also problematic. Avoid it. There is ZERO reason to EVER use any bundled software. For anything. Anything you need to monitor or do there is a GOOD version of in the aftermarket.

If you want to monitor stuff, use HWinfo or for newer Ryzen systems, Ryzen master. For you, HWinfo should have everything you could ever need or want when it comes to monitoring.

I would get rid of AI Suite and GPU tweak.

Monitoring software

HWmonitor, Open hardware monitor, Realtemp, Speccy, Speedfan, Windows utilities, CPU-Z, NZXT CAM and most of the bundled motherboard utilities are often not the best choice as they are not always accurate. Some are actually grossly inaccurate, especially with certain chipsets or specific sensors that for whatever reason they tend to not like or work well with. I've found HWinfo or CoreTemp to be the MOST accurate with the broadest range of chipsets and sensors. They are also almost religiously kept up to date.

CoreTemp is great for just CPU thermals including core temps or distance to TJmax on older AMD platforms.

HWinfo is great for pretty much EVERYTHING, including CPU thermals, core loads, core temps, package temps, GPU sensors, HDD and SSD sensors, motherboard chipset and VRM sensor, all of it. When starting HWinfo after installation, always check the box next to "sensors only" and de-select the box next to "summary".


Run HWinfo and look at system voltages and other sensor readings.

Monitoring temperatures, core speeds, voltages, clock ratios and other reported sensor data can often help to pick out an issue right off the bat. HWinfo is a good way to get that data and in my experience tends to be more accurate than some of the other utilities available. CPU-Z, GPU-Z and Core Temp all have their uses but HWinfo tends to have it all laid out in a more convenient fashion so you can usually see what one sensor is reporting while looking at another instead of having to flip through various tabs that have specific groupings, plus, it is extremely rare for HWinfo to not report the correct sensor values under the correct sensor listings, or misreport other information. Utilities like HWmonitor, Openhardware monitor and Speccy, tend to COMMONLY misreport sensor data, or not report it at all.

After installation, run the utility and when asked, choose "sensors only". The other window options have some use but in most cases everything you need will be located in the sensors window. If you're taking screenshots to post for troubleshooting, it will most likely require taking three screenshots and scrolling down the sensors window between screenshots in order to capture them all.

It is most helpful if you can take a series of HWinfo screenshots at idle, after a cold boot to the desktop. Open HWinfo and wait for all of the Windows startup processes to complete. Usually about four or five minutes should be plenty. Take screenshots of all the HWinfo sensors.

Next, run something demanding like Prime95 (With AVX and AVX2 disabled) or Heaven benchmark. Take another set of screenshots while either of those is running so we can see what the hardware is doing while under a load.


*Download HWinfo



For temperature monitoring only, I feel Core Temp is the most accurate and also offers a quick visual reference for core speed, load and CPU voltage:


*Download Core Temp



Also, posting screenshots, when requested, is helpful so WE can see what is going on as well and you can learn how to do that here:

How to post images on Tom's hardware forums

 
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lucmaiden

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Thanks for you great respone!

I knew about HWinfo by some years ago, I really like it.
I will do some tests.

For the games: I played Far Cry 5, and Wolfenstein New Colossus and they worked great (expect 2-3 freezes in Wolfen... but I know that game is well-knowed for that got it fixed by disabling Vertical Sink and motion blur)

AI got ripped off my system...
GPU tweak will leave too, I used it just to manually test the fans and they works great.

I sent you a screenshoot of those peripheral marked as uninstalled (code 28) I don't understand why it is related to Nvidia as those peripherals are marked as USB and Wireless devices... All my system is running well. Theses item seemed to have appeared afer DDU... Could it be appeared when I swapped the GPU to another PCIE slot?

View: https://i.imgur.com/Fer7zbJ.png
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
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I'm assuming you DID install the latest version of the Nvidia game ready drivers AFTER you ran the DDU, and that you DID run the DDU for "Nvidia" while IN SAFE MODE, yes? You followed the guide I linked to earlier?

Can you open device manager and take a screenshot of what is showing there?
 

lucmaiden

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Yes, I've done all the guide step by step and yes I've installed the latest drivers. And here is the print screen.

I've tried to uninstalled them and let windows try to find something without result. Uninstalling theses devices does'nt not affect the rest of the system. but I really prefer to not have any marks in device manager.

 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
That is not listing your hardware. That is just a bunch of screenshots that doesn't tell me anything at all about what I need to know.

Plus it's in a language I don't speak, which I said before. So, I'm done here. Good luck.
 

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