Problems getting a stable (stock) system

jebuchanan

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A friend of mine has a new computer system that he wishes to later OC. But for now it is not even stable at stock settings.
He has a GigaByte GA-EG31M-S2 mobo, and an Intel Core 2 Duo E8400 CPU.
Core Temp reports idle temps of 55'
using the BIOS' own [performance mode] settings, his FSB is 200MHz, memory is 800Mhz (PC2-6400), multiplier is 12
He is using a stock heatsink at this time.
The computer crashes when he runs anything, which I believe is due to heat buildup on the CPU.

The BIOS does have a [standard mode] setting, but I am not sure what the numbers are for that mode -
I can only assume (from the manual) the following: FSB: 333, memory: 800, multiplyer of 7

Anyone offer any suggestions/help, please?
 

Fruity

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55°C at idle is very very hot (assuming your friend doesn't live in Saudi Arabia with no air con!).

Check the CPU / heatsink installation and Vcore setting........
 

jebuchanan

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I thought about that but also thought the system would have been put together correctly before it was sold. I also thought the default settings would set the Vcore to a safe and valid voltage. The manual shows 1.3, but I will check what it is in reality.
As for the heatsink, that would mean removing it, cleaning it and reapplying heat transfer compound and reseating it, correct?
 

Fruity

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Never assume that even a reputable PC manufacturer would get a CPU heatsink to fit correctly all the time lol.
You might not need to remove the heatsink all together to check if it's seated properly. Open the case and have a good look at the mounting pins and see if any of them are seated differently from the rest. Also put your hand on the heatsink and see if it easily rocks. The LGA775 heatsink mountings can be a right pain to fit properly depending on the heatsink you are using. The stock Intel coolers (imo) are not simple to fit.

Removing the TIM compound (heat transfer compound) and replacing it with something like Arctic Silver 5 will be a good idea when it comes to overclock time. If the heatsink isn't seated properly, then remove it, replace the TIM compound, then refit.

1.3V sounds relatively high for a Vcore, but a lot depends on the VID for the processor. Saying that, I can't see that 1.3V would give the temps you are seeing. Programmes like CPUZ will give the Vcore info. It's a free download and a handy utility to have for overclocking. The chances are that you can get away with a significant reduction in Vcore from 1.3V. It's doubtful that it would fix your thermal issues but it may help.
To give an indication, for my Q6600, the Asus BIOS auto setting puts Vcore at around 1.28V. At stock speeds, it will run stable at just 1.08V!!

Just as a caution, auto settings can end up over-volting so definitely worth finding out how much is going to the CPU.......

Quick Edit: had another thought - make sure all of the fans are working and properly set-up. They won't do much good if they aren't spinning fast enough, or not spinning at all!!
 

jebuchanan

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I will check that. I have had good success with my own overclocking (Q6600), but needed to ask someone about this CPU. Thank you for the reply.