Processor missing pins

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I have a Celeron 2.8 400 mhz Northwood with 3 missing pins.
(Sold to me by a fraud on ebay who vanished in the mist -
why do these characters even bother shipping you anything?)
I looked up the pins and their function on Intel's website.
They are:
Pin Function

W1 A29#
Y5 VSS
AD5 BSEL1

I'm assuming I can ignore the VSS pin, which is just
one of many VSS pins which supply voltage. I assume
the A29# is an address line which must be connected.

I don't really know what BSEL1 is. It's described on
Intel's chart as "Power/Other" directed toward the
output.

So, my thinking is, if I can get away without the
BSEL1 pin, I can just stick something in the W1
socket to make contact and the processor might work.
Does this sound feasible? Is it worth the trouble?
 

Andy

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On Fri, 20 May 2005 22:05:44 -0600, A Jones <ajones@nospam.me.noway>
wrote:

>I have a Celeron 2.8 400 mhz Northwood with 3 missing pins.
>(Sold to me by a fraud on ebay who vanished in the mist -
>why do these characters even bother shipping you anything?)
>I looked up the pins and their function on Intel's website.
>They are:
>Pin Function
>
>W1 A29#
>Y5 VSS
>AD5 BSEL1
>
>I'm assuming I can ignore the VSS pin, which is just
>one of many VSS pins which supply voltage. I assume
>the A29# is an address line which must be connected.
>
>I don't really know what BSEL1 is. It's described on
>Intel's chart as "Power/Other" directed toward the
>output.

The Celeron processor on 0.13 micron process currently operates at a
400 MHz system bus frequency (selected by a 100 MHz BCLK[1:0]
frequency). Individual processors will operate only at their specified
system bus frequency.
Table 5. BSEL[1:0] Frequency Table for BCLK[1:0]
BSEL1 BSEL0 Function
L L 100 MHz
L H RESERVED
H L RESERVED
H H RESERVED

If BSEL1 isn't driven, and it's pulled high on the motherboard, then
you'll have trouble.
>
>So, my thinking is, if I can get away without the
>BSEL1 pin, I can just stick something in the W1
>socket to make contact and the processor might work.
>Does this sound feasible? Is it worth the trouble?
>
 
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On Sat, 21 May 2005 10:55:35 +0000, Andy wrote:

>>I don't really know what BSEL1 is. It's described on
>>Intel's chart as "Power/Other" directed toward the
>>output.
>
> The Celeron processor on 0.13 micron process currently operates at a
> 400 MHz system bus frequency (selected by a 100 MHz BCLK[1:0]
> frequency). Individual processors will operate only at their specified
> system bus frequency.
> Table 5. BSEL[1:0] Frequency Table for BCLK[1:0]
> BSEL1 BSEL0 Function
> L L 100 MHz
> L H RESERVED
> H L RESERVED
> H H RESERVED
>
> If BSEL1 isn't driven, and it's pulled high on the motherboard, then
> you'll have trouble.

I see. But it appears then that BSEL1 doesn't really do anything
meaningful, so chances are the motherboard's going to ignore it anyway.
 
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On Sat, 21 May 2005 08:23:13 -0600, A Jones <ajones@nospam.me.noway>
wrote:

>On Sat, 21 May 2005 10:55:35 +0000, Andy wrote:
>
>>>I don't really know what BSEL1 is. It's described on
>>>Intel's chart as "Power/Other" directed toward the
>>>output.
>>
>> The Celeron processor on 0.13 micron process currently operates at a
>> 400 MHz system bus frequency (selected by a 100 MHz BCLK[1:0]
>> frequency). Individual processors will operate only at their specified
>> system bus frequency.
>> Table 5. BSEL[1:0] Frequency Table for BCLK[1:0]
>> BSEL1 BSEL0 Function
>> L L 100 MHz
>> L H RESERVED
>> H L RESERVED
>> H H RESERVED
>>
>> If BSEL1 isn't driven, and it's pulled high on the motherboard, then
>> you'll have trouble.
>
>I see. But it appears then that BSEL1 doesn't really do anything
>meaningful, so chances are the motherboard's going to ignore it anyway.
>

If the pins were removed on purpose, then it was probably done to
change the FSB and/or increase the voltage. This is a common trick by
overclockers. Try it, you might be pleasantly surprised, and you have
nothing to lose.
 

Andy

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Mar 31, 2004
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0
19,280
Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

On Sat, 21 May 2005 08:23:13 -0600, A Jones <ajones@nospam.me.noway>
wrote:

>On Sat, 21 May 2005 10:55:35 +0000, Andy wrote:
>
>>>I don't really know what BSEL1 is. It's described on
>>>Intel's chart as "Power/Other" directed toward the
>>>output.
>>
>> The Celeron processor on 0.13 micron process currently operates at a
>> 400 MHz system bus frequency (selected by a 100 MHz BCLK[1:0]
>> frequency). Individual processors will operate only at their specified
>> system bus frequency.
>> Table 5. BSEL[1:0] Frequency Table for BCLK[1:0]
>> BSEL1 BSEL0 Function
>> L L 100 MHz
>> L H RESERVED
>> H L RESERVED
>> H H RESERVED
>>
>> If BSEL1 isn't driven, and it's pulled high on the motherboard, then
>> you'll have trouble.
>
>I see. But it appears then that BSEL1 doesn't really do anything
>meaningful, so chances are the motherboard's going to ignore it anyway.
>
Why do you think the motherboard ignores BSEL?

2.9 System Bus Frequency Select Signals (BSEL[1:0])
The BSEL[1:0] are output signals used to select the frequency of the
processor input clock (BCLK[1:0]). Table 2-4 defines the possible
combinations of the signals, and the frequency associated with each
combination. The required frequency is determined by the processor,
chipset, and clock synthesizer. All agents must operate at the same
frequency.
The Pentium 4 processor with 512-KB L2 cache on 0.13 micron process
currently operates at a 400 MHz, 533 MHz, or 800 MHz system bus
frequency. The Pentium 4 processor Extreme Edition supporting
Hyper-Threading Technology currently operates at 800 MHz system bus
frequency. Individual processors will operate only at their specified
system bus frequency.
For more information about these pins, refer to Section 4.2 and the
appropriate platform design guidelines.
Table 2-4. BSEL[1:0] Frequency Table for BCLK[1:0]
BSEL1 BSEL0 Function
L L 100 MHz
L H 133 MHz
H L 200 MHz
H H RESERVED
 
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On Sun, 22 May 2005 09:49:52 +0000, Andy wrote:

> On Sat, 21 May 2005 08:23:13 -0600, A Jones <ajones@nospam.me.noway>
> wrote:
>
>>On Sat, 21 May 2005 10:55:35 +0000, Andy wrote:
>>
>>>>I don't really know what BSEL1 is. It's described on
>>>>Intel's chart as "Power/Other" directed toward the
>>>>output.
>>>
>>> The Celeron processor on 0.13 micron process currently operates at a
>>> 400 MHz system bus frequency (selected by a 100 MHz BCLK[1:0]
>>> frequency). Individual processors will operate only at their specified
>>> system bus frequency.
>>> Table 5. BSEL[1:0] Frequency Table for BCLK[1:0]
>>> BSEL1 BSEL0 Function
>>> L L 100 MHz
>>> L H RESERVED
>>> H L RESERVED
>>> H H RESERVED
>>>
>>> If BSEL1 isn't driven, and it's pulled high on the motherboard, then
>>> you'll have trouble.
>>
>>I see. But it appears then that BSEL1 doesn't really do anything
>>meaningful, so chances are the motherboard's going to ignore it anyway.
>>
> Why do you think the motherboard ignores BSEL?
>
> 2.9 System Bus Frequency Select Signals (BSEL[1:0])
> The BSEL[1:0] are output signals used to select the frequency of the
> processor input clock (BCLK[1:0]). Table 2-4 defines the possible
> combinations of the signals, and the frequency associated with each
> combination. The required frequency is determined by the processor,
> chipset, and clock synthesizer. All agents must operate at the same
> frequency.
> The Pentium 4 processor with 512-KB L2 cache on 0.13 micron process
> currently operates at a 400 MHz, 533 MHz, or 800 MHz system bus
> frequency. The Pentium 4 processor Extreme Edition supporting
> Hyper-Threading Technology currently operates at 800 MHz system bus
> frequency. Individual processors will operate only at their specified
> system bus frequency.
> For more information about these pins, refer to Section 4.2 and the
> appropriate platform design guidelines.
> Table 2-4. BSEL[1:0] Frequency Table for BCLK[1:0]
> BSEL1 BSEL0 Function
> L L 100 MHz
> L H 133 MHz
> H L 200 MHz
> H H RESERVED

The table you've just produced is different from the table you produced
above, in which all combinations but L L are reserved. Even so, if a
motherboard supports only 100 mhz bus frequency, chances are still good
it ignores the BSEL1. What else would it do with it?