Question Program that records temperature/wattage/voltage in real-time

Mar 22, 2020
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Hi!

I'm looking for a program that is able to save different variables in a text file, graph or similar. I have tried using the CPUID Hardware Monitor, but you have to press "Stop recording" for it to save.

I have an issue where my PC restarts when doing specific things and I want to see what the different temperatures were on the point of shut down.

Any help appreciated! :)
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
I suspect you're probably looking at this the wrong way.
There's 'live' software that can monitor your temps/voltage etc in real-time, which would give you a solid idea whether you're looking at temperature, voltage or similar.

I.e., if you're running X component at 60'C, it's not suddenly going to spike to unsafe temps and cause a shutdown. If you're hovering right at that 'safe' line already, you already have a pretty good idea.


I'd suggest starting with your full system specs.
 
Intel Extreme Tuning Utility offers graphs in real-time when used for monitoring only. It has been around for several years.

I suggest you list some information about your system, if you want anyone to know what you have.
 
Mar 22, 2020
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Components:
ASUS GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER DUAL EVO OC V2
AMD Ryzen 7 3700X

ASUS ROG Strix B450-F GAMING, Socket-AM4
HyperX Fury RGB DDR4 2666MHz 16GB
Corsair TX850M, 850W PSU
Kingston A2000 1TB NVMe M.2 SSD

When running the Superposition benchmark for my GPU it never crashed, tested up to 1080p extreme settings.
CPU test: https://cpux.net/cpu-benchmark-online/h3r5t around 60 degrees Celsius at average during this.

When I start up a game, for example Final Fantasy XIV or The Witcher 3, I can get through the main menu and press play/continue/etc. and when it is supposed to show heavier graphics it crashes before I see anything. For The Witcher 3 it loads all they way up to the part where you would get into the game.
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
Are you actually "crashing" or shutting down?

Crashing (to desktop, losing display etc) may be driver related.
Power completely could be PSU or VRM temps etc. If it were the CPU or GPU, they have failsafes in place to throttle rather than risk damaging components.
 
Mar 22, 2020
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It's an instant reboot as if I in a millisecond switched the PC off and on again. No BSOD or error, nothing logged in Event Viewer.
 

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