Question Programs close after starting

Feb 23, 2021
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Whenever I try to start a program it stops responding and closes with no warning.
The apps that are affected are - every Steam games, Mc Launcher, and Spotify closes after starting.
Some apps aren't affected - Browsers(opera, chrome, edge), Discord, and steam.

I have tried using sfc/scannow in Command Prompt as administrator but the problem still occurs, I have also rebooted my PC multiple times with nothing to change.
This could possibly be from a Windows 10 update, but I am not able to rewind said update.
 
Reactions: Griaule
Whenever I try to start a program it stops responding and closes with no warning.
The apps that are affected are - every Steam games, Mc Launcher, and Spotify closes after starting.
Some apps aren't affected - Browsers(opera, chrome, edge), Discord, and steam.

I have tried using sfc/scannow in Command Prompt as administrator but the problem still occurs, I have also rebooted my PC multiple times with nothing to change.
This could possibly be from a Windows 10 update, but I am not able to rewind said update.
No it's likely software conflict
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
In the future, don't do a reset. Ever. There is absolutely ZERO benefit to doing a reset over doing a clean install. You don't save your personal information or installed applications, so there is no point to it compared to a clean install that fully clears the slate AND gets rid of all the junkware that was originally installed with the system in the beginning IF it was an OEM prebuilt machine, or even if it wasn't in some cases.

The problem with the "reset" and "restore" images on laptops and prebuilt OEM systems, is that when you use THAT, you also put all of the preinstalled bloatware back on there as well OR if you were already having problems but maybe didn't know about it yet in the case of a restore, you might just be putting the exact same problem right back on the drive. We've seen such high numbers of cases where brand new systems could barely hold their own necks up due to the weight of all the bloatware that they ran as though they were terribly infected with malware when they actually only had piles of useless "optimization" and other bundled software installed.

I ALWAYS recommend doing a clean install whenever there's a question of which way to go. That includes every time Microsoft releases a major update. Microsoft does not have a very good track record of making transitions between upgrades or major updates terribly smooth, seamless or trouble free. Usually, more often than not, problems are created that did not exist before the update or upgrade. Not in every case to be sure, but often enough to warrant avoiding the process when it is at all possible or at the very least, every other major update/upgrade.

Continuing to simply upgrade/update or reinstall the factory bloatware often just continues to put the same problems that existed from the start, right back where you left them prior to the process. I would never allow one of my machines, or any machine I work on, to go longer than two major updates without doing a clean install to the newest available Windows ISO release, and usually, unless there are circumstances that make it terribly inconvenient to do so, every major update.

If you wish to DO a clean install, you can do so as follows. This is totally up to each person to determine if that is the best course of action for them or not. In some few cases, there are very good reasons such as having software installed that cannot easily be reinstalled or a really terrible internet connection that makes it difficult to download the installers. Otherwise, I highly recommend it.

The Pro and Enterprise versions DO have better administration tools, and that is the ONLY reason to go with those versions IMO.


Windows 10 Clean install tutorial


.
 
In the future, don't do a reset. Ever. There is absolutely ZERO benefit to doing a reset over doing a clean install. You don't save your personal information or installed applications, so there is no point to it compared to a clean install that fully clears the slate AND gets rid of all the junkware that was originally installed with the system in the beginning IF it was an OEM prebuilt machine, or even if it wasn't in some cases.

The problem with the "reset" and "restore" images on laptops and prebuilt OEM systems, is that when you use THAT, you also put all of the preinstalled bloatware back on there as well OR if you were already having problems but maybe didn't know about it yet in the case of a restore, you might just be putting the exact same problem right back on the drive. We've seen such high numbers of cases where brand new systems could barely hold their own necks up due to the weight of all the bloatware that they ran as though they were terribly infected with malware when they actually only had piles of useless "optimization" and other bundled software installed.

I ALWAYS recommend doing a clean install whenever there's a question of which way to go. That includes every time Microsoft releases a major update. Microsoft does not have a very good track record of making transitions between upgrades or major updates terribly smooth, seamless or trouble free. Usually, more often than not, problems are created that did not exist before the update or upgrade. Not in every case to be sure, but often enough to warrant avoiding the process when it is at all possible or at the very least, every other major update/upgrade.

Continuing to simply upgrade/update or reinstall the factory bloatware often just continues to put the same problems that existed from the start, right back where you left them prior to the process. I would never allow one of my machines, or any machine I work on, to go longer than two major updates without doing a clean install to the newest available Windows ISO release, and usually, unless there are circumstances that make it terribly inconvenient to do so, every major update.

If you wish to DO a clean install, you can do so as follows. This is totally up to each person to determine if that is the best course of action for them or not. In some few cases, there are very good reasons such as having software installed that cannot easily be reinstalled or a really terrible internet connection that makes it difficult to download the installers. Otherwise, I highly recommend it.

The Pro and Enterprise versions DO have better administration tools, and that is the ONLY reason to go with those versions IMO.


Windows 10 Clean install tutorial


.
Thank you for that catch. However there are some cases where it is the only option you have. I will give him that.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
There is only one situation where you could do a reset and not do a clean install, and that is if you lack both a flash drive and an internet connection. Otherwise, you can ALWAYS do a clean install if you can do a reset. And often you can do a clean install even when a reset is not possible as the recovery partition is missing from the drive, which I've seen in more than one instance.
 
There is only one situation where you could do a reset and not do a clean install, and that is if you lack both a flash drive and an internet connection. Otherwise, you can ALWAYS do a clean install if you can do a reset. And often you can do a clean install even when a reset is not possible as the recovery partition is missing from the drive, which I've seen in more than one instance.
Or you have internet however the one device you have to use wont download. Or the device you want to use isn't work properly and keeps dropping connection. Yeah. Theres a few reasons.
 

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