[SOLVED] PSU popped/failed after power button pressed

valiantsmash

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Hi all,

So this question has been asked previously in another context but I cannot seem to find the answers to my queries.

I have recently upgraded my PC with a new SSD and 4x 8GB DDR3 Ripjaws. Before I purchased these I took into consideration my wattage load and proceeded to purchase considering it was all fine. I had then installed all the new components and the PC was working as expected.

3 days later I woke up in the morning and turned the computer on (as I always do) first at the outlet on the wall, then pressed the power button. After the power button was pressed (approx 2 seconds) there was a loud "pop" and the PC shut off within a instant. I just assumed it was the PSU and it has been unplugged ever since.

So my questions are very light and most likely quite easy to answer.

My PSU is an EVGA 1200W P2 80+ which is 4 years old. All of my components add up to around 600w and are also around 4 years old. I do understand 1200w PSU for a 600w build is a little overkill but I enabled myself room for upgrades. I considered the failure could have been an overload but going by my wattage calculations it seems unlikely.

My build:

Motherboard: RoG Crosshair V Formula Z
CPU: AMD FX 8350 Black
CPU Cooling: Cryorig R1
GPU: 1x Geforce GTX 780 (Previously 2-way SLI but due to previous failure one was removed)
RAM: 4x 8GB 1600mhz DDR3 G.skill ripjaws X
1x Samsung 860 pro 256GB SSD
3x Standard WD 3.5 1TB HDD
Cooling: 4x fans. 3x 120mm and 1x 200mm
PCIe LED strip

My way of shutdown is usually standard. I shut down my PC at the end of every usage session and I then switch off at the outlet on the wall. Do you find the best way to do this? Should I be switching off the PSU on the rear of the PSU as well? Do you find this affects the life of the PSU?

I am a little on edge about installing a new PSU as I am worried my other components may have sparked some kind of failure. I have just purchased the 1600w p2 80+ (and yes again, very overkill but I am trying to be safe than sorry) which I will be putting in my rig tonight. I am going to purchase a surge plug and a powerboard with individual switch to avoid any possible surging in future.

I had bought new ram and installed it a few days before the failure. During this time I realised my ram was not running at full frequency and only at 1333mhz. I did some research and ended up changing the frequency in my bios from "Auto" to "1600mhz". The PC was working fine after that and was registering the full amount (31.9 usable) I know this is paranoia and being a little pedantic but surely this could not have caused a PSU failure correct?

The night before the failure I had turned the PC off prematurely at the wall outlet during shut down. I have done this in the past and surely this is not good for the PSU. I then went to bed. The next morning I powered up the pc and that's when it happened

My final question is what do you think caused this failure? Could it be a faulty power board/outlet? Do you think it could be a general failure? Could it be my poor management of power down?Do you think it could be problems within the rig itself? Am I safe to install a new PSU?

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks all!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
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Yes, it helps. So if you bought that 4 years ago, and you bought it new, it is still under warranty. Those units have a 10 year warranty and I'd contact EVGA about a replacement under the terms of the warranty. Get the RMA going now because it will take a week or two to send yours in and get a replacement sent out.

More important though is figuring out WHY this happened in the first place. Whatever you do, in the future, do NOT regularly plug an unplug the PSU from the wall WITHOUT FIRST turning off the switch on the back of the power supply, AND, just as importantly, it is not necessary and ill advised to do so at all. Simply shutting down the system via the start menu is sufficient unless there are storms in the area where you feel like there is a risk of a direct strike or surge, in which case you should shut down via the start menu, then turn off the switch on the power supply and THEN unplug the unit from the wall.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Actually, you shouldn't need to do ANY of that. Putting it to sleep and then resuming will result in power usage that equals maybe pennies per year. But if you feel better shutting it down all the way, then that is all you need to do. You don't need to, and SHOULDN'T, be using the power switch on the PSU except when you need to work inside the case. You also don't need to shut down your power strip or outlet, whatever that means. I'm guessing it's a GFCI outlet and you're triggering the breaker, or something. Regardless, it's not necessary and is probably actually more harmful than anything.

As for why it happened, that's anybody's guess, but I think your first order of business should be to determine if it's actually the PSU or if it's something else.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ixcWCrYpw3Y



View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ac7YMUcMjbw
 

valiantsmash

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GFCI outlet
The Outlet is just the standard wall point. This is where my PC is plugged into.


You also don't need to shut down your power strip or outlet, whatever that means
Ah right. I didn't know that!
My wife is very pedantic about electricity usage and anything that could pose a fire hazard. She turns everything off and unplugs everything from the walls whenever she leaves the house as she is very paranoid. This includes gas stovetop valves etc.


determine if it's actually the PSU or if it's something else.
I don't have a device to test my PSU unfortunately is there another way around this?
 

FALC0N

Splendid
.........My PSU is an EVGA 1200W P2 80+ which is 4 years old. All of my components add up to around 600w and are also around 4 years old. I do understand 1200w PSU for a 600w build is a little overkill but I enabled myself room for upgrades....................I have just purchased the 1600w p2 80+ (and yes again, very overkill but I am trying to be safe than sorry)
Im assuming an overclocked, multi-socket, multi-GPU, setup with a large RAID array is in your future plans?
 

valiantsmash

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Im assuming an overclocked, multi-socket, multi-GPU, setup with a large RAID array is in your future plans?
Maybe ;) Haha.

I do a ton of video editing, photo editing and gaming. RAID is my end goal. GPU is an immediate goal. It will take me sometime to save the $$$ but it'll be perfect one day.
 

valiantsmash

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If you can't come up with a paperclip or something similar to see if the PSU at least turns on, then no, there's really no other less complicated options.
I can find a paperclip, It just seems like a very dangerous way to test a PSU. I don't think I would like to take that risk. I appreciate your advice though
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yes, it helps. So if you bought that 4 years ago, and you bought it new, it is still under warranty. Those units have a 10 year warranty and I'd contact EVGA about a replacement under the terms of the warranty. Get the RMA going now because it will take a week or two to send yours in and get a replacement sent out.

More important though is figuring out WHY this happened in the first place. Whatever you do, in the future, do NOT regularly plug an unplug the PSU from the wall WITHOUT FIRST turning off the switch on the back of the power supply, AND, just as importantly, it is not necessary and ill advised to do so at all. Simply shutting down the system via the start menu is sufficient unless there are storms in the area where you feel like there is a risk of a direct strike or surge, in which case you should shut down via the start menu, then turn off the switch on the power supply and THEN unplug the unit from the wall.
 

valiantsmash

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Simply shutting down the system via the start menu is sufficient unless there are storms in the area where you feel like there is a risk of a direct strike or surge, in which case you should shut down via the start menu, then turn off the switch on the power supply and THEN unplug the unit from the wall.
Highly noted. Haha. Thank you very much for that.

I think tonight I am going to unplug my PCIe LEDs (Because they are tacky) and get rid of them and reset CMOS. I know I have a faulty HDD as well so i'll remove my HDDs until I can work out which one it is. Ill then add in my new 1600w p2 80+. Ill request warranty today and maybe I can reuse the replaced unit in a new build.

Really appreciate your help on this. It has most definitely provided me a little peace of mind.

You dont think the change from Auto to 1600mhz could have over done it? The RAM are sold as 1600mhz but only run at 1333mhz.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
No. That wouldn't have done it. It was something you DID that caused it, almost certainly. I'd bet the unplugging or the unplugging before shutting down that were to blame. Or possibly plugging the unit back into the wall without the PSU switch being turned off. Always make sure the switch on the back of the PSU is turned to the 0 position, not the I position, when you plug the cable into the wall. Then turn the PSU switch to the I position. But that only needs to be done IF there is a danger of lightning strikes in the area or if you are working inside the case and replacing hardware. Anytime you work inside the case and install or remove hardware, always shut off the PSU at least, and preferably unplug from the wall or the PSU as well.
 

valiantsmash

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No. That wouldn't have done it. It was something you DID that caused it, almost certainly. I'd bet the unplugging or the unplugging before shutting down that were to blame. Or possibly plugging the unit back into the wall without the PSU switch being turned off. Always make sure the switch on the back of the PSU is turned to the 0 position, not the I position, when you plug the cable into the wall. Then turn the PSU switch to the I position. But that only needs to be done IF there is a danger of lightning strikes in the area or if you are working inside the case and replacing hardware. Anytime you work inside the case and install or remove hardware, always shut off the PSU at least, and preferably unplug from the wall or the PSU as well.
Thank you for that. I have just had a talk with my wife. I am purchasing a power board that has surge protection an an individual on/off switch for each port. That way we can power off anything unnecessary such as lamps, monitors without affecting the PC itself.

I appreciate all of you advice. This thread has now been resolved :)
 

USAFRet

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She turns everything off and unplugs everything from the walls whenever she leaves the house as she is very paranoid. This includes gas stovetop valves etc.
That's actually counter productive.
On-Off-On-Off will wear the valve assembly much faster, leading to wear and leakage much earlier than expected.

Same with wall sockets, power strips and PSU's.
 

valiantsmash

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That's actually counter productive.
On-Off-On-Off will wear the valve assembly much faster, leading to wear and leakage much earlier than expected.

Same with wall sockets, power strips and PSU's.
Oh man.. I feel very silly now haha. It makes complete sense though.

Thank you everyone for your advice and suggestions.

I have reassembled my build with the EVGA 1600w p2 and its working perfectly.

I have purchased a powerboard (powerstrip) with individual switches and surge protection so that the PC can remain powered on but remain shut down unless used. This will prevent the consistent power on, power off habit.

Thank you all again, I'll be sure to be cautious of this in future.
 

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