Question PSU producing a lot of heat

KngLegend

Prominent
Oct 13, 2020
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510
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Specs:
CPU: R9 5900x
GPU: RTX 3080
RAM: 4x8GB 3000 MHz
PSU 850W EVGA bronze

I just upgraded my GPU from a 2060 super to a 3080, before I installed the 3080 my PSU was fine and never produced this much heat. But after I installed my 3080 the PSU has been producing a lot of heat when running a game. There is no smell to the heat and the heat is only located at the bottom of the case where the PSU is located. The case is still new and doesn't have a large amount of dust located inside. I have 3 intake fans at the front connected directly to the PSU (didn't have a splitter available when building and cannot control the speed), 2 outtake at the top, 1 outtake at the back, and the PSU fan is used as an intake pulling from under the case and has a good amount of space between the table. My GPU sits around 65C with auto fan turned on and my CPU sits at 60C. According to MSI afterburner and ryzen master, my GPU is pulling at peak 306W and my CPU is pulling 75W at peak. What are the possible issues causing my CPU to heat up so much? I will also answer any questions if I missed any important information.
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
Specs:
CPU: R9 5900x
GPU: RTX 3080
RAM: 4x8GB 3000 MHz
PSU 850W EVGA bronze

I just upgraded my GPU from a 2060 super to a 3080, before I installed the 3080 my PSU was fine and never produced this much heat. But after I installed my 3080 the PSU has been producing a lot of heat when running a game. There is no smell to the heat and the heat is only located at the bottom of the case where the PSU is located. The case is still new and doesn't have a large amount of dust located inside. I have 3 intake fans at the front connected directly to the PSU (didn't have a splitter available when building and cannot control the speed), 2 outtake at the top, 1 outtake at the back, and the PSU fan is used as an intake pulling from under the case and has a good amount of space between the table. My GPU sits around 65C with auto fan turned on and my CPU sits at 60C. According to MSI afterburner and ryzen master, my GPU is pulling at peak 306W and my CPU is pulling 75W at peak. What are the possible issues causing my CPU to heat up so much? I will also answer any questions if I missed any important information.
Energy = heat. The more power you draw, the more heat. And a Bronze-rated PSU needs to draw more power to output a particular wattage than, say, a Gold or Platinum-rated PSU. Though things will still run hotter if you upgrade the PSU. Not that a PSU upgrade wouldn't be recommended; there's no Bronze-rated EVGA PSU that I'd consider of high enough quality to run with an RTX 3080.
 
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KngLegend

Prominent
Oct 13, 2020
5
0
510
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Energy = heat. The more power you draw, the more heat. And a Bronze-rated PSU needs to draw more power to output a particular wattage than, say, a Gold or Platinum-rated PSU. Though things will still run hotter if you upgrade the PSU. Not that a PSU upgrade wouldn't be recommended; there's no Bronze-rated EVGA PSU that I'd consider of high enough quality to run with an RTX 3080.
Would an 850w plat be better than 1000w gold be better in this case?
 

Pextaxmx

Commendable
Jun 15, 2020
352
44
1,740
7
Probably not. Whether it's worth it to you comes down to the price difference. The big thing is quality; a PSU that could reach 100% of efficiency would still result in a lot of heat.
This statement cannot be true. If your PSU is 80% efficient, the heat you feel is exactly the wasted 20%. 100% means no waste = no heat from PSU
 
As others have suggested, take that PSU and throw it out of the window. I wouldn't run my rig on that PSU if I had your rig. Something will blow.

You need a good quality gold unit like this to handle both the CPU, and your 3080 which has large transient power spikes. I'm surprised your system isn't shutting down randomly.

Something like this:

PCPartPicker Part List

Power Supply: Corsair RM850x (2021) 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($134.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $134.99
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2022-10-04 14:54 EDT-0400


The RMX are known to handle transient power spikes very well. Along with your 5900x which isn't exactly a power hog, but you want to give your system a chance at least.

If your CPU is unusually hot, you may have to look at some general house cleaning (clear out dust etc), replace thermal paste, and or a better case with better airflow to balance things out.
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
This statement cannot be true. If your PSU is 80% efficient, the heat you feel is exactly the wasted 20%. 100% means no waste = no heat from PSU
That's just waste output or what it can't effectively transmit in a directly useful form to the components. The form changes, but eventually, it all becomes heat.

Are we really going to have to go into the first Laws of Thermodynamics?
 
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Pextaxmx

Commendable
Jun 15, 2020
352
44
1,740
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That's just waste output or what it can't effectively transmit in a directly useful form to the components. The form changes, but eventually, it all becomes heat.

Are we really going to have to go into the first Laws of Thermodynamics?
that is the exactly the point.

if all the AC power from the wall is 100% converted to DC there is no heat from PSU. Only that satisfies the conservation of energy.

The devices that use DC power will of course generate heat. But not the PSU (if 100%)
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
that is the exactly the point.

if all the AC power from the wall is 100% converted to DC there is no heat from PSU. Only that satisfies the conservation of energy.

The devices that use DC power will of course generate heat. But not the PSU (if 100%)
Well, duh. I didn't say that all the heat will be from the PSU. I said that "it would still result in a lot of heat." Which it will. The OP talked about their CPU temperatures as well; it's clear they care about the temperature of their components, not just the particular heat of one component.
 

Pextaxmx

Commendable
Jun 15, 2020
352
44
1,740
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Well, duh. I didn't say that all the heat will be from the PSU. I said that "it would still result in a lot of heat." Which it will. The OP talked about their CPU temperatures as well; it's clear they care about the temperature of their components, not just the particular heat of one component.
if we are in agreement, the answer to the question below should be yes.
(1) Gold rating has higher efficiency (2) 1000W probably let the OP 's system operate at peak efficiency? (please check the efficiency curve from the spec sheet)

edit: sorry I got this wrong way... I realize the question was 850W plat vs 1000W gold... I would say corrected answer is "depending on the efficiency curve of each PSU"?
if we talk about only the peak efficiency, bronze wastes 15% and plat wastes only 8%. That's nearly half of the heat for the same power draw.
Would an 850w plat be better than 1000w gold be better in this case?
 
Last edited:

geofelt

Titan
Is the psu fan running? If, for some reason it is not, then heat will accumulate and you run the risk of psu failure.

Every psu will have an efficiency curve.
Normally, the most efficient part of the curve comes when the psu is operating in the middle third of it's range.
Yes, your new 3080 is going to stress your psu more and you are likely to be running near the top end.

Other than the heat generated, are there any other issues?
If not, do nothing.

If you are inclined to change out your psu, the first thing to do is to overprovision, say to a 1000w unit so it will operate at the best part of it's curve.

Then, consider if platinum or titanium rating is worth it to you.
 

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