[SOLVED] Psu returns 110v even in power off mode!

maxwellsc

Reputable
Aug 20, 2016
27
0
4,530
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I have a Cooler Master V650 Modular Computer Power Supply that is giving me high voltage all the time, i tried it at multiple places and directly to power sources and alone so i know its faulty and nothing else is interfering.

Even with earth & power cable it gives me 110v.

The problem is that the entire case is being charged with constant voltage.

Every single metallic object inside the case is untouchable, im talking entire case body and screws and USB cable and network cable or anything else that is metallic.


What should I do?
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Not totally sure about the specifics but will answer as I understand the situation.

This:

"The problem is that the entire case is being charged with constant voltage" - by "case" you mean the computer's case - correct?

There is an electrical short somewhere. Some contact between a live/hot 110 v component or wire and the case body. Has the wall outlet been checked?

What you can do:

First - do not plug the computer again.

Second - get a multimeter and use it to find where the electrical short is located.

If you do not have a multimeter or know how to use find a knowledgeable family member or friend who does.

However if you know, as stated, that the PSU is faulty, then replace the PSU.

For the most part PSUs are not repairable and even if so it is very likely that some other internal PSU component will fail thereafter.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Not totally sure about the specifics but will answer as I understand the situation.

This:

"The problem is that the entire case is being charged with constant voltage" - by "case" you mean the computer's case - correct?

There is an electrical short somewhere. Some contact between a live/hot 110 v component or wire and the case body. Has the wall outlet been checked?

What you can do:

First - do not plug the computer again.

Second - get a multimeter and use it to find where the electrical short is located.

If you do not have a multimeter or know how to use find a knowledgeable family member or friend who does.

However if you know, as stated, that the PSU is faulty, then replace the PSU.

For the most part PSUs are not repairable and even if so it is very likely that some other internal PSU component will fail thereafter.
 

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