PSU Within A PSU: In Win Signature Series SIII-1065, Available Only With D-Frame 2 Limited Edition Chassis

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Jeff Fx

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> The D-Frame's structure reminds us of a motorcycle frame

It reminds me of a bicycle frame, but that isn't as cool, is it.

>The price of the D-Frame 2.0 reaches a whopping $1,200. This case clearly isn't for the average user.

With a look that appeals to children, and a $1,200 price tag, what is the expected market for this?
 

zahoome

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Reminds me of a rollcage, but I can definitely see the bicycle frame in there.


Kids with rich parents? The ones that get Ferraris, Lamborghinis, etc for their 16th birthday?

Anybody else notice the option to put a radiator at the bottom? That's perfect for shedding all the heat you've drawn from the CPU/GPU... and having it go right past the CPU/GPU.
 

InvalidError

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There isn't all that much between the two: modern motorcycle frames are basically two bicycle frames on steroids side by side to provide room for the engine and all related components with ties in-between for structural rigidity.
 

anbello262

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I agree that it looks a lot like a Ducati. But the bottom does kind of look like a bicycle.
And I really like its looks, to be honest.

The only reason I wouldn't buy it (if I wanted to spend that money) is because of dust and fingerprints. I don't want to have to clean my PC every night to keep it looking nice.
 

kyle382

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"...the overall design allows for a crystal clear view of the system's hardware, something that all modders will highly appreciate."

rofl righhhtt. More likely created for the sole purpose of attracting attention to the InWin table at this years hardware conventions. I can't imagine they sell more than 20 of these.
 
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I can't think of a case I'd want from them, but that's also true of (nearly) all available cases from other manufacturers as well. In Win must be doing something right, though, as they've found a high end niche in a very competitive market. They've met with some degree of success, or else they wouldn't be able to keep cranking out their mostly very pricey cases.

The proprietary psu strategy would be risky for most case manufacturers, but then probably not many manufacturers are able to take the risks that In Win has of late, in general.
 

norseman4

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Yeah, but that would only affect the non-water-cooled components which the apparent targets for this really would not have very many of. This PC (epeen) display case isn't for me, but the bottom radiator mount isn't that bad.
 

nycalex

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i absolutelly love their 805 and 909 chassis. very classy looking and best of all not accesible to the average user. both are $179 and $399.
i always like to buy things not everyone is going to have, and i don't mind paying for that as long as it looks good.

however this frame case leaves me scratching my head with the price.............
i understand the $2500 pricetag on their transforming one they showed at CES, but i don't see anything so unique about this open frame.
 

zahoome

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Maybe. But that heat will still go past various components (water-cooled or not) and some heat will be transferred. The waterblocks/fittings/hoses/etc will still get some heat from the hot air rising past them. Air-cooled parts will be similarly affected. It's probably not a big deal, especially with how open the case is. It's also an optional radiator location. Given the choice, however, I'd rather not have the heat path go right past my components, making a feedback loop.
 

gn842a

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The practical side of me says just screw your components on to a sheet of plywood and hang it up on the wall behind your screen. Call it the "found art" look.
 

zahoome

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There are all sorts of examples of that, not necessarily on plywood, though. Just google "wall mounted computer" and scan through the images.
 

gn842a

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Wow Zahoome what was an interesting google ride. I wonder how these guys make the installs look so clean. I've got the modem, the linksys, the ooma unit, the audio system, the printer, the monitor, and some USB thingies which form a great wire mass. On my downstairs build I was able to hide a lot of it on my upstairs build they wires just form a big tangle in a corner behind the PC. It all works, but it ain't much to look at.
 

zahoome

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Cable bundling and routing? With it wall mounted, you can also get cable/wire channels that cover the cables. You could also run them inside the wall. Fairly easy to do with drywall and between studs. It gets more complicated if you need to go through studs or there's a horizontal piece of wood blocking your path.

As for the PC itself you could have two levels, with your components on top and cable passes to route your cables underneath. Very similar to how cases work now.
 
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