[SOLVED] Q6600 CPU causes my PC to shut down after Bios screen ?

May 7, 2021
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I have Installed a Q6600 CPU on Asus P5gc mx motherboard, was working well for two months but now my PC shuts down after BIOS screen ?
So I have re-installed my old CPU ( E2160 ) and my PC boots to Windows 10 no problem ?

My Rig :-

Motherboard:- Asus P5gc mx.
Processor :- q6600 ( 3 core and 3 threads I don't why. )
Ram :- 4gb ( 3.6gb usable).
2 x HDD: 160 GB & 500 GB (Windows 10 installed on the latter)
Power Supply :- 450 watt.
Graphic Card :-Zotac GTX 750 TI 2GB GDDR5.

Please give me a solution.
 
May 7, 2021
3
0
20
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945GC chipset has never supported quads, likely because it was designed for only two things on the FSB (CPU and Northbridge. C2Q are actually two dual-core CPUs on one package so that would be three things and also explains why the quads didn't overclock as well). Furthermore, only the last revision of the chipset actually supported 1066FSB so even the stock speed may be overclocking.

Given that your board has no voltage controls for FSB/MCH, your only option left is to try underclocking: at 800FSB that's 9 x 200 = 1.8GHz or same as your E2160 but more cores. The most straightforward way to do this is to plug in some DDR2-400 (PC2-3200) as Intel desktop chipsets cannot run the FSB faster than the RAM, but you may be able to manually set the DRAM frequency at 400 in the BIOS using the E2160 before switching processors.

The 945 chipset came out in 2005 so was clearly Pentium-4 era, and the only reason it worked with C2D at all is because that CPU shared the same FSB design, and because some aftermarket board manufacturers used a flexible enough VRM to do so. ASUS even certified it for Pentium D which is also three things on 1066FSB (but only 2 cores)
check for overheating? bend pin?
check with another psu?
Yes I think it is because it's overheating because the temperature in my city Nagpur, Maharashtra, lndia is around 30° C to 40 ° C in daytime.
And I checked in bios when temperature is high (around 107° Celsius) it shuts down.
I have ordered a branded thermal paste for repasting.

Thanks For Your Time.
 
945GC chipset has never supported quads, likely because it was designed for only two things on the FSB (CPU and Northbridge. C2Q are actually two dual-core CPUs on one package so that would be three things and also explains why the quads didn't overclock as well). Furthermore, only the last revision of the chipset actually supported 1066FSB so even the stock speed may be overclocking.

Given that your board has no voltage controls for FSB/MCH, your only option left is to try underclocking: at 800FSB that's 9 x 200 = 1.8GHz or same as your E2160 but more cores. The most straightforward way to do this is to plug in some DDR2-400 (PC2-3200) as Intel desktop chipsets cannot run the FSB faster than the RAM, but you may be able to manually set the DRAM frequency at 400 in the BIOS using the E2160 before switching processors.

The 945 chipset came out in 2005 so was clearly Pentium-4 era, and the only reason it worked with C2D at all is because that CPU shared the same FSB design, and because some aftermarket board manufacturers used a flexible enough VRM to do so. ASUS even certified it for Pentium D which is also three things on 1066FSB (but only 2 cores)
 
Reactions: Nihal Gour
May 7, 2021
3
0
20
1
945GC chipset has never supported quads, likely because it was designed for only two things on the FSB (CPU and Northbridge. C2Q are actually two dual-core CPUs on one package so that would be three things and also explains why the quads didn't overclock as well). Furthermore, only the last revision of the chipset actually supported 1066FSB so even the stock speed may be overclocking.

Given that your board has no voltage controls for FSB/MCH, your only option left is to try underclocking: at 800FSB that's 9 x 200 = 1.8GHz or same as your E2160 but more cores. The most straightforward way to do this is to plug in some DDR2-400 (PC2-3200) as Intel desktop chipsets cannot run the FSB faster than the RAM, but you may be able to manually set the DRAM frequency at 400 in the BIOS using the E2160 before switching processors.

The 945 chipset came out in 2005 so was clearly Pentium-4 era, and the only reason it worked with C2D at all is because that CPU shared the same FSB design, and because some aftermarket board manufacturers used a flexible enough VRM to do so. ASUS even certified it for Pentium D which is also three things on 1066FSB (but only 2 cores)
But I was using it for 2 months with it working properly ?
And I have a problem that I had purchased this CPU from Flipkart and I checked in software and bios it shows 3 core and 3 threads in task manager, so also can you help me with that please ?

Thank You for Replying.
 
Last edited:
While it's impressive that an unsupported CPU half-worked for months, that's no guarantee that it would continue to do so. My suggestion was so you could perhaps get into the BIOS again with that CPU to try some other things--while your board does not have voltage controls, it does allow manually setting memory timings and speeds.

It's worth a try though because only 1MB L2 cache is just terrible on Windows 10 and 2 x 4MB is much better even at the same speed. Keep in mind though if there's no BIOS microcode for the CPU, then it is running the errata-filled original instructions installed in the CPU itself when it was manufactured back in 2007.

Shutting off by itself is bad, because Core 2 can clock itself down to as low as 200MHz to prevent overheating, and shutting off means even that was not enough.
 
Reactions: Nihal Gour

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