[SOLVED] Q9500 temp check

Tac 25

Great
Jul 25, 2021
123
12
85
0
Hi, today updated my backup pc from E8400 to a Q9500. It's my pc for retro gaming, and playing games that don't run in Windows 10.

all seems well, no black screen or bsod. Also played King of Fighters XIII with it for 2 hours, no problems.

the temperatures seems low.. someone told me this processor can run hot.
are these temps normal? or maybe the game I played just did not stress it too much.

 
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CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
55C is quite good.
If it goes over 71C, then you have to improve cooling.
SkyNetRising,

Respectfully, I have unselected your answer as the Best Answer because this information is incorrect. Normally I would PM you with the explanation so you could correct the answer yourself, but since you signature states "PM-s will go unanswered" I will provide the correct information on your behalf for everyone's benefit. After all is said and done, our common goal is to give the community correct information so our Members and visiting readers do not become misinformed.

Tj Max or "Throttle" temperature is 100°C for the Core 2 Quad Q9500.

You most likely posted the value of "71" based on Intel's "Tcase" Thermal Specification, which can be found on Intel's "Product Specifications" Website - Q9500 link https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/37159/intel-core2-quad-processor-q9500-6m-cache-2-83-ghz-1333-mhz-fsb.html

Don't feel singled out, because since 2006, millions of users have been misled by Tcase, which continues to be a HUGE source of confusion.

While there are not just one, but TWO thermal specifications for desktop processors shown on Intel's Datasheets (Tcase AND Tjunction), Intel's Website shows only Tcase for Core 2 and Core i processors through 6th Gen, OR only Tjunction for Core i processors from 7th Gen through 11th Gen. Yet the 11th Generation Flagship i9-11900K has a Tcase spec in the Datasheets.

Tcase is a factory only temperature measurement using a laboratory "thermocouple" sensor embedded in the center of the external surface of the IHS (Integrated Heat Spreader) where the cooler is seated. Since retail processors do not have this sensor, users can NOT monitor IHS temperature, which is Tcase, and is why there's no software to do so. Instead, the utilities we all use monitor "Core" temperatures, which is where heat originates deep within the Cores at the transistor "Junctions"; thus the term "Tjunction". So ... Tcase is NOT Core temperature ... it's IHS temperature that we can NOT monitor.

Moreover, because Laptop (Mobile) processors don't have an IHS, the cooler is seated directly on the CPU silicon Die, which is why they don't have a Tcase specification; only Tjunction. More correctly, Tjunction (Temperature Junction Maximum) is called "Tj Max" which is commonly known as "Throttle" temperature. Intel has never updated the Thermal Specifications on their Website for older Desktop processors from Tcase to Tjunction, so the confusion continues to this day.

What the Website does not tell you is that Intel's intended purpose for providing Tcase specifications is primarily for developers of aftermarket coolers. So from Core 2 processors in 2006 to today's Core i processors, the limiting Thermal Specification has always been Tj Max; not Tcase. For end users, this means Tcase is irrelevant.

There are illustrations and a detailed explanation in my Intel CPU Temperature Guide 2021. I suggest that you give it a read, especially Section 7 - Specifications and Temperature.

Tac 25,

Like the vast majority of Intel's Desktop processors, "Throttle" temperature for your Q9500 is 100°C. However, the consensus among well informed and highly experienced reviewers, system builders and expert overclockers, is that it's prudent to observe a reasonable thermal margin below Throttle temperature for ultimate stability, performance and longevity. So regardless of environmental conditions, hardware configurations, software workloads or any other variables, Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended.

Here's the nominal operating range for Core temperature:

Core temperatures below 80°C are ideal.



If you'd like to properly test thermal performance, then use a steady-state true 100% workload which is Prime95 Small FFTs. But under your current gaming workload, as you can see, your highest Core temperature at 55°C is well within the recommended ideal values. As such, you have nothing to be concerned about, so enjoy your rig!

CT :sol:
 
Looks normal to me. If you have good cooling on a 95w lga775, it will rarely even hit 60c. Enjoy your upgrade, although I'm surprised you picked the q9500 versus the e8600 as the e8600 single thread performance is like an i3-560:
https://www.cpubenchmark.net/compare/Intel-Core2-Quad-Q9500-vs-Intel-Core2-Duo-E8400-vs-Intel-Core2-Duo-E8600-vs-Intel-i3-560/1047vs955vs957vs740

Sure you don't have as many cores, but if it's just xp or win7, I've found the single thread performance for a singular task is pretty stellar.
 
Reactions: Tac 25

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
55C is quite good.
If it goes over 71C, then you have to improve cooling.
SkyNetRising,

Respectfully, I have unselected your answer as the Best Answer because this information is incorrect. Normally I would PM you with the explanation so you could correct the answer yourself, but since you signature states "PM-s will go unanswered" I will provide the correct information on your behalf for everyone's benefit. After all is said and done, our common goal is to give the community correct information so our Members and visiting readers do not become misinformed.

Tj Max or "Throttle" temperature is 100°C for the Core 2 Quad Q9500.

You most likely posted the value of "71" based on Intel's "Tcase" Thermal Specification, which can be found on Intel's "Product Specifications" Website - Q9500 link https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/37159/intel-core2-quad-processor-q9500-6m-cache-2-83-ghz-1333-mhz-fsb.html

Don't feel singled out, because since 2006, millions of users have been misled by Tcase, which continues to be a HUGE source of confusion.

While there are not just one, but TWO thermal specifications for desktop processors shown on Intel's Datasheets (Tcase AND Tjunction), Intel's Website shows only Tcase for Core 2 and Core i processors through 6th Gen, OR only Tjunction for Core i processors from 7th Gen through 11th Gen. Yet the 11th Generation Flagship i9-11900K has a Tcase spec in the Datasheets.

Tcase is a factory only temperature measurement using a laboratory "thermocouple" sensor embedded in the center of the external surface of the IHS (Integrated Heat Spreader) where the cooler is seated. Since retail processors do not have this sensor, users can NOT monitor IHS temperature, which is Tcase, and is why there's no software to do so. Instead, the utilities we all use monitor "Core" temperatures, which is where heat originates deep within the Cores at the transistor "Junctions"; thus the term "Tjunction". So ... Tcase is NOT Core temperature ... it's IHS temperature that we can NOT monitor.

Moreover, because Laptop (Mobile) processors don't have an IHS, the cooler is seated directly on the CPU silicon Die, which is why they don't have a Tcase specification; only Tjunction. More correctly, Tjunction (Temperature Junction Maximum) is called "Tj Max" which is commonly known as "Throttle" temperature. Intel has never updated the Thermal Specifications on their Website for older Desktop processors from Tcase to Tjunction, so the confusion continues to this day.

What the Website does not tell you is that Intel's intended purpose for providing Tcase specifications is primarily for developers of aftermarket coolers. So from Core 2 processors in 2006 to today's Core i processors, the limiting Thermal Specification has always been Tj Max; not Tcase. For end users, this means Tcase is irrelevant.

There are illustrations and a detailed explanation in my Intel CPU Temperature Guide 2021. I suggest that you give it a read, especially Section 7 - Specifications and Temperature.

Tac 25,

Like the vast majority of Intel's Desktop processors, "Throttle" temperature for your Q9500 is 100°C. However, the consensus among well informed and highly experienced reviewers, system builders and expert overclockers, is that it's prudent to observe a reasonable thermal margin below Throttle temperature for ultimate stability, performance and longevity. So regardless of environmental conditions, hardware configurations, software workloads or any other variables, Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended.

Here's the nominal operating range for Core temperature:

Core temperatures below 80°C are ideal.



If you'd like to properly test thermal performance, then use a steady-state true 100% workload which is Prime95 Small FFTs. But under your current gaming workload, as you can see, your highest Core temperature at 55°C is well within the recommended ideal values. As such, you have nothing to be concerned about, so enjoy your rig!

CT :sol:
 

Tac 25

Great
Jul 25, 2021
123
12
85
0
@SamirD

thanks, and noted.. so the e8600 is good too. Might try getting that if the q9500 would have trouble with the old games in this pc., but right now, I'm content with it. Have chosen it as the perfect upgrade, for compatibility reasons. Because saw someone post at CPUID site that he has a Samsung Desktop Sytem mobo with 4-10-2010 Bios.. by lucky coincidence, my Samsung Desktop System mobo has a Bios 4-13-2010. And true enough, on the day the processor was installed, the pc booted smoothly as if nothing has happened. No errors at all. :)

now have in hand a Cooler Master T20. But unable to install it, because I lack the skills to remove the motherboard from the case.. will bring the pc to the store at the mall, gonna ask the technician there to attach the T20.

___

@CompuTronix

hello, and wow.. that's a rather detailed explanation on things. Hmm, so the danger zone is 85 degrees.. got it.

I gamed a bit more using other games in the pc, and the highest reached is 64 degrees. So I guess it's safe. Right now, only have a stock cooler, but would upgrade to a Cooler Master T20 in a week or two.

would like to ask just one more thing if you don't mind. This Windows 7 pc, I intend to use it for old games 2013 and below.. and here's the question.. since the q9500 was created 2013, I would assume it can handle all games created 2013 and earlier? Or am I thinking wrong in this? The gpu paired with it is a GT 1030, which PC Builds say is a good combination. https://pc-builds.com/calculator/Core2_Quad_Q9500/GeForce_GT_1030/0gT0YB/

 
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@SamirD

thanks, and noted.. so the e8600 is good too. Might try getting that if the q9500 would have trouble with the old games in this pc., but right now, I'm content with it. Have chosen it as the perfect upgrade, for compatibility reasons. Because saw someone post at CPUID site that he has a Samsung Desktop Sytem mobo with 4-10-2010 Bios.. by lucky coincidence, my Samsung Desktop System mobo has a Bios 4-13-2010. And true enough, on the day the processor was installed, the pc booted smoothly as if nothing has happened. No errors at all. :)

now have in hand a Cooler Master T20. But unable to install it, because I lack the skills to remove the motherboard from the case.. will bring the pc to the store at the mall, gonna ask the technician there to attach the T20.
Yep, not only that, the e8600 is cheap too even when finding genuine used ones. (I think I got 4x of them for around $30 a few years ago.)

I wouldn't mess with your cooling at all since it's nicely in range. If you have any doubts on cooling, just set the fans to 100% when you'll be using a high load and that will keep everything nice and cool. Pre-built systems when engineered right (sounds like yours is) will do very well just in stock form. I have a Gateway sx2803 that I installed a q9500 in that's very similar to your system and it works great with stock cooling. :)
 

Tac 25

Great
Jul 25, 2021
123
12
85
0
just one last thing on this. To test a little further if temps will spike.. played a bit of King of Fighters XIV, a PS4 game supposed to be played on my other pc with GTX 1050ti. Surprised, the Q9500 paired only with a GT 1030, and 4GB ram was able to run the game smoothly. No lag at all. One of the cores seems to have reached 71 degrees at some point, but not going higher than that.



so I guess this means that everything is fine.

was actually expecting the game to be unplayable, since it's recommended specs are 8GB ram, i5-4670, and the GPU is GTX 950 or higher. So tonight's performance by the Q9500 and GT 1030 is a pleasant surprise.
 
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