Qualcomm Reveals Quick Charge, Powers Devices 40% Faster

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teh_chem

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Amazing;

News story from Zak Islam about an Apple-related subject = a lengthy and embellishing discussion frequented with irrelevant corollary info that also embellishes the company.

News story from Zak Islam about a non-Apple-related subject = a poor, dry mention of some topic with virtually no supporting info.

On topic, when I got my optimus G I noticed that it charged strikingly fast.
 

boulbox

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[citation][nom]Soma42[/nom]Cool. Any effect on long term battery life?[/citation]

none that i have had so far, but i charge from my computer(meaning slower charge so i do not overcharge)
 

danwat1234

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Blah blah blah, what does battery charge rate have to do with Qualcomm silicon??
Your bottleneck is the 1 amp (5 watts) from a USB 3.0 connector, or a bit more from some beefy USB power ports that plug into the wall.
Yes you need circuitry to monitor incoming voltage, current, battery temperature and perhaps internal resistance but what does charge rate have to do with chips? It's not a specialized technology, it doesn't take high tech hardware to manage a single cell lithium battery.
 

teh_chem

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[citation][nom]danwat1234[/nom]Blah blah blah, what does battery charge rate have to do with Qualcomm silicon??Your bottleneck is the 1 amp (5 watts) from a USB 3.0 connector, or a bit more from some beefy USB power ports that plug into the wall.Yes you need circuitry to monitor incoming voltage, current, battery temperature and perhaps internal resistance but what does charge rate have to do with chips? It's not a specialized technology, it doesn't take high tech hardware to manage a single cell lithium battery.[/citation]
The shoddy reporting in this article is to blame; if you look further into it, you'll find out that this technology came about when Qualcomm purchased a company that developed this quick charge technology (and has nothing to do with qualcomm processors specifically; only that more than likely, the licensing for using a qualcomm processor probably also includes the technology for this quick charge 1.0). The quick charge tech. is integrated into the power management IC (not the cpu), and can be built into any device that charges via USB regardless of what CPU the device uses--no doubt only if the manufacturer pays for and licenses the quick charge technology...

You're correct, charging speed is/can be impacted by sub-standard current delivery (people with the galaxy note 2 likely noticed that it charged much faster with the 2A power wart)--but this technology would (theoretically) enable a phone to charge faster with the same current adapter. How, I don't know, and the explanation of this tech is not clear--the implication is the current bottleneck for most phone charging is actually not the current available, but rather the power management brains for how charging is handled.
 

ddpruitt

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which powers devices 40 percent faster than previous generations.
A Quick Charge could fully charge a device under three hours, while other devices without the Quick Charge 1.0 technology installed could take over four hours.
Ummmm did someone forget how to do math? With the example the give this works out to a 25% improvement not 40% otherwise the charge time is closer to too hours. Nitpicking yes but given how they give zero information on this tech I think it's a big deal. I for one would like some details before I believe any of this.

 
[citation][nom]danwat1234[/nom]Blah blah blah, what does battery charge rate have to do with Qualcomm silicon??Your bottleneck is the 1 amp (5 watts) from a USB 3.0 connector, or a bit more from some beefy USB power ports that plug into the wall.Yes you need circuitry to monitor incoming voltage, current, battery temperature and perhaps internal resistance but what does charge rate have to do with chips? It's not a specialized technology, it doesn't take high tech hardware to manage a single cell lithium battery.[/citation]

Qualcomm makes much more than just SoCs. Also, the article states that this technology is a feature of some Qualcomm PMICs (Power-Management Integrated Circuit), not the SoC, in the article's third paragraph.
 
[citation][nom]teh_chem[/nom]Amazing;News story from Zak Islam about an Apple-related subject = a lengthy and embellishing discussion frequented with irrelevant corollary info that also embellishes the company.News story from Zak Islam about a non-Apple-related subject = a poor, dry mention of some topic with virtually no supporting info_On topic, when I got my optimus G I noticed that it charged strikingly fast.[/citation]

Actually, this article gave a pretty good amount of information. It specifies many common phones with this technology and even states that this technology is a feature of the PMIC in many phones that use Qualcomm SoCs.

[citation][nom]ddpruitt[/nom]Ummmm did someone forget how to do math? With the example the give this works out to a 25% improvement not 40% otherwise the charge time is closer to too hours. Nitpicking yes but given how they give zero information on this tech I think it's a big deal. I for one would like some details before I believe any of this.[/citation]

It doesn't say exactly 4 hours and exactly three hours. It says over four hours to under three hours. Assuming that the over and under are both about say 15 minutes, that's a nearly 40% drop. There's a difference between having a math error and using somewhat vague numbers :p

[citation][nom]teh_chem[/nom]The shoddy reporting in this article is to blame; if you look further into it, you'll find out that this technology came about when Qualcomm purchased a company that developed this quick charge technology (and has nothing to do with qualcomm processors specifically; only that more than likely, the licensing for using a qualcomm processor probably also includes the technology for this quick charge 1.0). The quick charge tech. is integrated into the power management IC (not the cpu), and can be built into any device that charges via USB regardless of what CPU the device uses--no doubt only if the manufacturer pays for and licenses the quick charge technology...You're correct, charging speed is/can be impacted by sub-standard current delivery (people with the galaxy note 2 likely noticed that it charged much faster with the 2A power wart)--but this technology would (theoretically) enable a phone to charge faster with the same current adapter. How, I don't know, and the explanation of this tech is not clear--the implication is the current bottleneck for most phone charging is actually not the current available, but rather the power management brains for how charging is handled.[/citation]

The article clearly states that this is a feature of a PMIC (not the Qualcomm SoCs) and it doesn't claim that Qualcomm invented the technology either.

Also, I find the implication to be that not only is the power delivery of most USB ports being low, but also, not instead, the power regulation of the device being charged. Perhaps most devices have very inefficient *PSUs* and Qualcomm's PMIC significantly improves on them.
 

danwat1234

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[citation][nom]blazorthon[/nom]Perhaps most devices have very inefficient *PSUs* and Qualcomm's PMIC significantly improves on them.[/citation]
Good idea that could be it. Same current in, more power to battery (less heat). My friend has a GS3 and it barely gets warm to the touch when charging off a 1A wall wart. It would be nice to know the max current all these Quick Charge phones can support. 1, 1.5, 2A. Maybe the AC adapter that comes with the phone is the answer.
There have been a few articles about how much it costs to charge your phone, maybe one of these studies will help show that newer phones use less power to input such and such watt hours to the battery.
 

saturnus

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[citation][nom]danwat1234[/nom]Your bottleneck is the 1 amp (5 watts) from a USB 3.0 connector, or a bit more from some beefy USB power ports that plug into the wall.[/citation]

No. That is not the bottleneck at all. 5V 1A = 5W but a Samsung S3 battery is 3.7V 2.1Ah = 7.77W. So even if we assume 25% loss during a recharge a battery should still recharge in under 2 hours.

It doesn't because of inherent limitations in the battery chemistry when used with traditional CC/CV (constant current/constant voltage) charging scheme.

All this fast charger does is use a modern PC/VV (pulsed current/variable voltage) charging scheme which reduces load on the battery so it can be safely charged faster.
 
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