Question Question about Gsync and a 3080 RTX

Louu

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I have a RTX 3080 10900k new system. Today I raid userbenchmark and at the end it told me that I did poor because I had Gsync enabled so I disabled it and ran userbenchmark again and I got like a 200-300% increase.

So my question is this.
Do I wanna enable turn on Gsync with a 3080 RTW or should I leave it off?

When I play my game I turn Vsync off I always have that off but I'm not sure if Gsync should be on or off with a 3080. Could someone clear this up for me ty.
 
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I'd like to know the answer to that question as well, it could help me (got a g-sync compatible monitor with an rtx 3060 Ti and I feel like it's being underused in games)
 

hotaru.hino

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So there's no way Gsync itself can cause stutters ?
There's additional overhead associated with G-Sync, but Userbenchmark should not be used as an indicative measure of performance. Just because you have a 200-300% increase in performance turning G-sync off doesn't mean it impacts everything else in a similar fashion.

For what it's worth though, 3DMark recommends you turn off G-Sync when running their tests. But this is just to both guarantee fewer, optional features are turned on and it levels the playing field.
 

RTX 2080

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Jun 8, 2020
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I have a RTX 2080 and a G-Sync ultimate monitor. In my experience, G-Sync is a very useful and helpful feature that does not introduce any side affects or limit performance at all (provided you run it properly).

This is what I've discovered works best for me after much experimentation:

Go to the Nvidia control panel and set G-sync to on, go to "manage 3D settings" and set vertical sync to "fast," and for "Max Frame rate" set a frame rate cap at the maximum refresh rate of your monitor.

This will allow your GPU to run at full utilization and to feed your monitor as many frames per second that in can handle. The only reason you should get low GPU utilization like this (I usually have 99-100% utilization) is due to hitting your max frame rate cap or due to a hardware bottleneck elsewhere in your PC (insufficient CPU/RAM).
 
Jan 19, 2021
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I have a RTX 2080 and a G-Sync ultimate monitor. In my experience, G-Sync is a very useful and helpful feature that does not introduce any side affects or limit performance at all (provided you run it properly).

This is what I've discovered works best for me after much experimentation:

Go to the Nvidia control panel and set G-sync to on, go to "manage 3D settings" and set vertical sync to "fast," and for "Max Frame rate" set a frame rate cap at the maximum refresh rate of your monitor.

This will allow your GPU to run at full utilization and to feed your monitor as many frames per second that in can handle. The only reason you should get low GPU utilization like this (I usually have 99-100% utilization) is due to hitting your max frame rate cap or due to a hardware bottleneck elsewhere in your PC (insufficient CPU/RAM).
Why do you set your v-sync to "fast" and not simply to "on" ? (honest question)
 

RTX 2080

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Why do you set your v-sync to "fast" and not simply to "on" ? (honest question)
V-Sync On has negative side affects (latency, frame timing issues), but so does V-Sync off (causes screen tearing). With V-Sync set to fast, (as explained in the Nvidia control panel software):

"GPU renders unconstrained similar to V-sync off, but does not tear since frames in excess of the frame rate of the monitor are dropped. Delivers latency that is very close to V-sync off with no tearing."

Basically, it allows your GPU to send frames to the monitor the moment it is done rendering them (without the side effects of V-Sync Off), allowing your GPU to run as fast as it can rather than having to play the hurry up and wait game.

Compared to V-Sync On and V-Sync Off, it's basically the best of both worlds; honestly, I'm surprised I don't hear about it more often.
 
Jan 19, 2021
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V-Sync On has negative side affects (latency, frame timing issues), but so does V-Sync off (causes screen tearing). With V-Sync set to fast, (as explained in the Nvidia control panel software):

"GPU renders unconstrained similar to V-sync off, but does not tear since frames in excess of the frame rate of the monitor are dropped. Delivers latency that is very close to V-sync off with no tearing."

Basically, it allows your GPU to send frames to the monitor the moment it is done rendering them (without the side effects of V-Sync Off), allowing your GPU to run as fast as it can rather than having to play the hurry up and wait game.

Compared to V-Sync On and V-Sync Off, it's basically the best of both worlds; honestly, I'm surprised I don't hear about it more often.
But... Isn't G-sync supposed to fix the tearing and stuff ? Besides, I thought it was "adaptive" v-sync that matched the description you just gave. Forgive me, I'm very confused.
 

RTX 2080

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But... Isn't G-sync supposed to fix the tearing and stuff ? Besides, I thought it was "adaptive" v-sync that matched the description you just gave. Forgive me, I'm very confused.
The description I game you in quotes is a direct quote from the Nvidia control panel as to what the "fast" V-Sync setting does.

G-sync is a feature that synchronizes your monitor's refresh rate with the frame rate leaving your GPU at any given time, preventing screen tearing.

As best as I understand it, the reason that V-sync on vs V-sync off is still a thing is because V-sync doesn't just go away because of the existence of G-sync, it is still very much a part of how the GPU decides to render frames, so it is still a setting that needs to be toggled on or off whether or not G-sync exists.

When using G-sync, by leaving V-sync on you introduce the downsides of V-sync on for no reason since you have a superior frame syncing technology already enabled (G-sync). By turning V-sync off, you eliminate this issue but cause another one: your GPU runs at 100% utilization even when it doesn't need too which causes frame rates to go way higher than your monitor's refresh rate in less graphically demanding areas (such as getting 1000 fps in a static game menu for example). When this happens, screen tearing occurs even with G-sync on because G-sync can only prevent screen tearing within the operational range of the monitor. Setting V-Sync to "fast" and setting a frame rate cap has solved these issues for me.

This is what has worked best for me and is by no means the only or even necessarily the best way of handling G-sync with V-sync. Experiment with the various settings to find out what works best for you.
 
Jan 19, 2021
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The description I game you in quotes is a direct quote from the Nvidia control panel as to what the "fast" V-Sync setting does.

G-sync is a feature that synchronizes your monitor's refresh rate with the frame rate leaving your GPU at any given time, preventing screen tearing.

As best as I understand it, the reason that V-sync on vs V-sync off is still a thing is because V-sync doesn't just go away because of the existence of G-sync, it is still very much a part of how the GPU decides to render frames, so it is still a setting that needs to be toggled on or off whether or not G-sync exists.

When using G-sync, by leaving V-sync on you introduce the downsides of V-sync on for no reason since you have a superior frame syncing technology already enabled (G-sync). By turning V-sync off, you eliminate this issue but cause another one: your GPU runs at 100% utilization even when it doesn't need too which causes frame rates to go way higher than your monitor's refresh rate in less graphically demanding areas (such as getting 1000 fps in a static game menu for example). When this happens, screen tearing occurs even with G-sync on because G-sync can only prevent screen tearing within the operational range of the monitor. Setting V-Sync to "fast" and setting a frame rate cap has solved these issues for me.

This is what has worked best for me and is by no means the only or even necessarily the best way of handling G-sync with V-sync. Experiment with the various settings to find out what works best for you.
I mean absolutely no offense, but Blurbusters' article about G-sync doesn't really say the same thing as you do...https://blurbusters.com/gsync/gsync101-input-lag-tests-and-settings/8/

"Unlike double buffer V-SYNC, however, Fast Sync won’t lock the framerate to half the maximum refresh rate if it falls below it, but like double buffer V-SYNC, Fast Sync will periodically repeat frames if the FPS is limited below the refresh rate, causing stutter. As such, an FPS limit below the refresh rate should be avoided when possible, and Fast Sync is best used when the framerate can exceed the refresh rate by at least 2x, 3x, or ideally, 5x times.
So, what about pairing Fast Sync with G-SYNC? Even Nvidia suggests it can be done, but doesn’t go so far as to recommend it. But while it can be paired, it shouldn’t be…
Say the system can maintain an average framerate just above the maximum refresh rate, and instead of an FPS limit being applied to avoid V-SYNC-level input lag, Fast Sync is enabled on top of G-SYNC. In this scenario, G-SYNC is disabled 99% of the time, and Fast Sync, with very few excess frames to work with, not only has more input lag than G-SYNC would at a lower framerate, but it can also introduce uneven frame pacing (due to dropped frames), causing recurring microstutter. Further, even if the framerate could be sustained 5x above the refresh rate, Fast Sync would (at best) only match G-SYNC latency levels, and the uneven frame pacing (while reduced) would still occur.
That’s not to say there aren’t any benefits to Fast Sync over V-SYNC on a standard display (60Hz at 300 FPS, for instance), but pairing Fast Sync with uncapped G-SYNC is effectively a waste of a G-SYNC monitor, and an appropriate FPS limit should always be opted for instead.
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