Question Question about systems that use a CPU with no integrated graphics

PewterScreaminMach

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Nov 18, 2010
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I've noticed high end systems listed for video editing that incorporate a separate high end graphics card but a processor that does not have integrated graphics, such as the Intel Xeons, F, etc.

My understanding, though, is that programs like Premiere Pro rely mostly on the CPU with the GPU only being used in a limited capacity for certain GPU-accelerated effects.

So does this mean that the "CPU-oriented" tasks handled in a program like this don't incorporate any of the integrated graphics portion of the CPU when they are present?

I'm only confused because when I simply play a high quality video on my computer, such as a 4K video in VLC Player, the GPU is actually used quite a bit (usage percentage is significant). But when I play the same video in Premiere Pro at Full quality (Live Preview), the GPU usage barely moves.

I guess I'm unclear on how this split of the work between normal (non-graphics) CPU labor and the graphics labor parts of it are split up in a program like this compared to just playing a video.

Hopefully this question makes sense.

Edit: as an example, I selected a random 4K video I took. When playing in VLC Player, CPU usage was 1% and GPU was around 19-20%. When playing the same clip as a Live Preview with no editing or effects in Premiere Pro at Full quality, CPU usage was around 25% and GPU usage around 6%.
 
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I've noticed high end systems listed for video editing that incorporate a separate high end graphics card but a processor that does not have integrated graphics, such as the Intel Xeons, F, etc.

My understanding, though, is that programs like Premiere Pro rely mostly on the CPU with the GPU only being used in a limited capacity for certain GPU-accelerated effects.

So does this mean that the "CPU-oriented" tasks handled in a program like this don't incorporate any of the integrated graphics portion of the CPU when they are present?

I'm only confused because when I simply play a high quality video on my computer, such as a 4K video in VLC Player, the GPU is actually used quite a bit (usage percentage is significant). But when I play the same video in Premiere Pro at Full quality (Live Preview), the GPU usage barely moves.

I guess I'm unclear on how this split of the work between normal (non-graphics) CPU labor and the graphics labor parts of it are split up in a program like this compared to just playing a video.

Hopefully this question makes sense.

Edit: as an example, I selected a random 4K video I took. When playing in VLC Player, CPU usage was 1% and GPU was around 19-20%. When playing the same clip as a Live Preview with no editing or effects in Premiere Pro at Full quality, CPU usage was around 25% and GPU usage around 6%.
Thing is in compression, unless there's specialty chip in GPU, it's CPU that does most of compression/decompression and you will see it's usage change between formats.
 

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