[SOLVED] Question about the MSI x570 Gaming Edge Wifi

amulsingh01

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I bought an MSI x570 gaming edge wifi to pair with a 3800x (still has yet to arrive) for around $175, but I've been seeing reviews on websites and on youtube claiming that the board runs ridiculously hot (on the PCB, etc.) and is not that high quality compared to the competition at around the same price point. Obviously, as someone who isn't that well informed when it comes to motherboard components, this caught my attention and has me slightly concerned about my purchase. What are your thoughts about this and is it worth returning it and buying something like the Aorus boards (which from the reviews have quality issues) or something like the ASUS boards. Thanks for any feedback.
 
Well, I'm definitely going to return the MSI. Would you get the ASUS tuf or the Aorus elite? The ASUS tuf is $165 on Newegg, making it decently cheaper than the Aorus.
For a 3800x I’d get a decent board and spend a bit more for something very reliable. I love the current Gigabyte Aorous boards, I run a Aorous Master Z390 with my 9900k. Gigabyte knows how to handle heavy power CPUs and intel are higher power than AMD. Asus is no slouch but You get what you pay for with any brand. I’d go Aorous Elite at a minimum with a 3800x.
 
I bought an MSI x570 gaming edge wifi to pair with a 3800x (still has yet to arrive) for around $175, but I've been seeing reviews on websites and on youtube claiming that the board runs ridiculously hot (on the PCB, etc.) and is not that high quality compared to the competition at around the same price point. Obviously, as someone who isn't that well informed when it comes to motherboard components, this caught my attention and has me slightly concerned about my purchase. What are your thoughts about this and is it worth returning it and buying something like the Aorus boards (which from the reviews have quality issues) or something like the ASUS boards. Thanks for any feedback.
I wouldn’t use a MSI X570 board. Aorous are very good as are Asus
 

jon96789

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I can attest to MSi's crappy board design... I bought a MSi X570 MPG Gaming Pro Carbon WiFi motherboard, their TOTL MPG series board and it was a piece of crap with a 5+2 phase VRM design. Using a 105-watt AMD Ryzen 9 3900x would drive the VRM temps to 95+ degrees C and the motherboard would throttle down the CPU speed until the VRMs cooled down (e.g. thermal throttling).

MSi was of no help, claiming that you cannot trust online reviews. They said they would test a system for me to verify if there was an issue, except that they used a MSi X470 MPG Gaming Pro Carbon (which has a slightly better VRM design than the X570 board)and an AMD Ryzen 7 3700x (which is a 65-watt CPU). Obviously, this meant the test system is invalid to what I have.

I ended up buying an ASUS X570 ROG Crosshair VIII Hero motherboard which has a far better VRMs with a 7+1 doubled phase design (equivalent to a 14+2). The ASUS VRMs barely blips, hitting max temps of ~50 degrees.

Mind you, the MSi boards run perfectly fine with AMD's 65-watt CPUs. I built another rig for my grandson using the 65-watt AMD Ryzen 7 3700x. With that CPU, the VRMs top off at about 55-60 degrees, which is perfectly fine.

In the end, if you can return the MSi board, by all means do so. The AMD Ryzen 9 3800x is a 1054-watt CPU and it will give the board some issues. As a whole, ASUS X570 boards have really good VRM designs, even their low end boards. I would be wary of Asrock and Gigabyte low priced boards. While they are nowhere as bad as MSI, they can hit ~75-80 degrees.
 
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amulsingh01

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May 29, 2016
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I can attest to MSi's crappy board design... I bought a MSi X570 MPG Gaming Pro Carbon WiFi motherboard, their TOTL MPG series board and it was a piece of crap with a 5+2 phase VRM design. Using a 105-watt AMD Ryzen 9 3900x would drive the VRM temps to 95+ degrees C and the motherboard would throttle down the CPU speed until the VRMs cooled down (e.g. thermal throttling).

MSi was of no help, claiming that you cannot trust online reviews. They said they would test a system for me to verify if there was an issue, except that they used a MSi X470 MPG Gaming Pro Carbon (which has a slightly better VRM design than the X570 board)and an AMD Ryzen 7 3700x (which is a 65-watt CPU). Obviously, this meant the test system is invalid to what I have.

I ended up buying an ASUS X570 ROG Crosshair VIII Hero motherboard which has a far better VRMs with a 7+1 doubled phase design (equivalent to a 14+2). The ASUS VRMs barely blips, hitting max temps of ~50 degrees.

Mind you, the MSi boards run perfectly fine with AMD's 65-watt CPUs. I built another rig for my grandson using the 65-watt AMD Ryzen 7 3700x. With that CPU, the VRMs top off at about 55-60 degrees, which is perfectly fine.

In the end, if you can return the MSi board, by all means do so. The AMD Ryzen 9 3800x is a 1054-watt CPU and it will give the board some issues. As a whole, ASUS X570 boards have really good VRM designs, even their low end boards. I would be wary of Asrock and Gigabyte low priced boards. While they are nowhere as bad as MSI, they can hit ~75-80 degrees.
Well, I'm definitely going to return the MSI. Would you get the ASUS tuf or the Aorus elite? The ASUS tuf is $165 on Newegg, making it decently cheaper than the Aorus.
 
Aug 10, 2019
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I have MSI x570 gaming plus mine none WiFi but have had no trouble with it at all I run r5 3600 on it I was in low 90c with stock cooler upgraded to a 6 copper pipe cooler stay 80-83c with full load love the easy OC bios of the MSI soon as I can get a water cooling setup. The vrm on the x570 gaming plus is 10 phase 8+2 not 5+2
 

jon96789

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actually, the MSi X570 MPG Gaming Plus is a 4+2 doubled that makes it 8+2. The MSi X570 MPG Gaming Pro Carbon is a 5+1 doubled which makes that a 10+2. But the components used by MSi is of a lower quality (lower voltage capacity) which means it cannot handle the voltages required on a 105-watt CPU... That's why some of Asrock's 4+2 boards are a bit cooler than the MSi with the same layout.

The OP is using a 105-watt 3800X which demands more current than your 65-watt 3600. My previous MSI X570 MPG Gaming Pro Carbon is being used by my grandson which now has a AMD 65-watt 3700x. The board now runs a lot cooler (~55-60 degrees) since the 3700x draws less current because it has only eight cores vs my 12-core 3900x.

You can find all the actual motherboard actual specs here...
 
Well, I'm definitely going to return the MSI. Would you get the ASUS tuf or the Aorus elite? The ASUS tuf is $165 on Newegg, making it decently cheaper than the Aorus.
For a 3800x I’d get a decent board and spend a bit more for something very reliable. I love the current Gigabyte Aorous boards, I run a Aorous Master Z390 with my 9900k. Gigabyte knows how to handle heavy power CPUs and intel are higher power than AMD. Asus is no slouch but You get what you pay for with any brand. I’d go Aorous Elite at a minimum with a 3800x.
 

jon96789

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You cannot judge prior motherboard generations with the current X570 boards or with their Intel counterparts... The brands really got mixed reviews (e.g. MSi's X470 boards performed somewhat better than their X570 ones, ASUS X570 boards performed better than their X470 boards). According to Hardware Unboxed, who posted a number of online YouTube X570 VRM board reviews ranked the below tested boards from best to worst...

All the boards were tested with the AMD Ryzen 9 3900x in an open configuration (i.e. not installed in a case) The enclosed numbers are the VRM controller phase mode design on the board)

Boards with VRM Temps 50-60 Degrees C
Gigabyte X570 Aorus Extreme (14+2)
MSi MEG X570 Godlike (7+1)
Gigabyte X570 Aorus Master (12+2)
ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Hero (7+1)
MSi MEG X570 Unify (6+2)

Boards with VRM Temps 60-70 Degrees C
MSi MEG X570 Ace (6+2)
ASUS ROG Strix X570-E Gaming (6+2)
Asrock X570 Phantom Gaming X (6+1)
Asrock X570 Taichi (6+1)
ASUS Prime X570-P (4+2)

Boards with VRM Temps 70-80 Degrees C
Gigabyte X570 Aorus Ultra (6+2)
Gigabyte X570 Aorus Pro WiFi (6+2)
ASUS TUF Gaming X570-Plus (4+2)
ASUS Prime X570-Pro (4+2)

Boards with VRM Temps 80-90 Degrees C
Gigabyte X570 Aorus Elite (6+1)
Asrock X570 Extreme 4 (4+2)
Asrock X570 Steel Legend (4+2)

Boards with VRM Temps 90-100 Degrees C
Asrock X570 Pro4 (4+2)
MSi X570 MPG Gaming Pro Carbon WiFi* (5+2)
Gigabyte X570 Gaming X (5+2)

Boards with VRM Temps >100 Degrees C
MSi X570 MPG X570-A Pro* (4+2)
MSi X570 MPG Gaming Edge WiFi* (4+2)

*The motherboard VRMs failed in testing, they throttled down the CPU speed until the VRMs reached acceptable temperatures...

As you can see, the type of phase design does not always correlate with a better VRM thermal performance. The components used on the board has a big effect on the VRM thermal performance. For example, the ASUS Prime X570-P (4+2) hits temps in the 60-70 degrees range, but the MSi X570 MPG Gaming Edge WiFi (4+2) actually hit ~125 degrees C. It is generally recommended to avoid boards that has VRM temps that exceed 80 degrees as that would mean a probable shortened component life on the board.

Regarding your question... The ASUS TUF runs about 10 degrees cooler than the Aorus Elite...
 

GarrettL

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Dec 4, 2019
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From my experience so far, I highly recommend the Asus TUF. It’s been running great with no set up issues at all. And it’s blazing fast.
 

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