Question Question regarding a PSU & No-Break

Sep 18, 2020
9
0
10
0
The PSU should be connected to a No-Break to prevent voltage spikes or it should be connect to the wall oulet?

If the anwser is YES... do you recomend one... im going to buy a Corsair RM850! Thanks
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
If by "no-break" you mean a UPS system (Uninterruptible power supply), then that's really up to you but you need to make sure you get one that is compatible with the power supply you get. Some power supplies will not work correctly without a Pure sine wave UPS, and will give you nothing but problems and potentially even fail, with a simulated sine wave unit. Pure sine wave UPS systems are more expensive than those that use a simulated sine wave so going with a cheap UPS may not be an option. It's never a GOOD option anyhow, but might not even BE an option in this case.

On the power supply, are you intending to get the RM850, RM850x or RM850i? Because there are significant differences between all of them.

If you are NOT going to use a UPS, then yes, it should be connected directly to the wall socket unless you have a high quality industrial power strip or power line conditioner.

Most people buy and use power strips because they THINK that the fact it says surge protector means something. Usually, it doesn't. This is one of my favorite quotes on the subject from an electrical engineer and residential/commercial electrical journeyman I know.


Buy a good one, but understand expensive OFTEN does not equal good.


"Monster" brand are the low end junk that are sold for a premium price. Look for what us professionals use. Tripp-lite is one of my go to absolute favorites as they have a price to quality mix that is exceptional. The Belkin brand is junk as far as I am concerned as they focus on how it looks and not how it works. APC is also another one that I will trust , but they mostly cater to data centers and Corporate customers when it comes to their quality units and they DO sell some lower end products that slot into the budget market that are not the same unquestionable quality as what they sell for professional and enterprise use.


Lastly, if you really care about your electronics, get a Whole house surge suppressor installed in your electrical panel. Only a few hundred bucks and it protects everything including the overpriced LED lightbulbs that is all the rage these days.

Units you want to consider will be those sold by APC, Tripp-Lite, Leviton, Eaton, Leviton, General Electric, Polyphaser, Ditek, Siemens, ABB, Square D, Intermatic, Cutler-Hammer (Eaton), and Syscom, these are the brands you can trust to have high quality internal electronics if you MUST use a power strip but even so you STILL will want to ask around about specific models OR look to professional reviews as even these big boys occasionally have a product with some glaring flaw that makes it's way into the final product and might best be avoided compared to other available models.

Do not however use a power strip thinking that it offers significant protection, because even the best of them does not, not really. Whole house protection is the only real protection from surges.


Monster and Belkin, and a few others that are commonly used, almost unilaterally use the same protections in their 45 dollar surge protector strips as what you would find in an 8 dollar Amazon or Walmart branded model. And if you ever take one of these, or any cheap box store, dollar store (Even worse than these others usually BUT occasionally about the same) or Harbor Freight power strip apart you are likely to find frayed wires, poorly soldered connections with blobs of solder nearly touching crucial and potential short circuit points, super low quality MOVs, and a ton of other indicators that no real integrity was involved in the design or manufacturer of these units.


Another factor to keep in mind is that even with some of these high quality units, any protection that MIGHT be afforded, is usually the end of that product after one shot. This, directly from the Tripp-Lite manual for the #1 selling surge protection power strip in the world.


All models feature an internal protection that will disconnect the surge-protective component at the end of its useful life but will maintain power to the load now unprotected.

I believe many models from APC and a couple of the others I listed have now incorporated designs that permanently disengage any ability of the device to deliver power once a surge or short of significant enough caliber to incur the protection has occured. That basically means once there has been a surge or short, throw the device away. Even for high end models. Only whole house protection and properly earthed circuits offer any true protection from a serious surge or direct strike from lightning somewhere close enough to affect your segment of the grid.


And whatever you do, don't EVER buy any kind of extension cord, power strip or other electronic device with slip rings.


 
Sep 18, 2020
9
0
10
0
If by "no-break" you mean a UPS system (Uninterruptible power supply), then that's really up to you but you need to make sure you get one that is compatible with the power supply you get. Some power supplies will not work correctly without a Pure sine wave UPS, and will give you nothing but problems and potentially even fail, with a simulated sine wave unit. Pure sine wave UPS systems are more expensive than those that use a simulated sine wave so going with a cheap UPS may not be an option. It's never a GOOD option anyhow, but might not even BE an option in this case.

On the power supply, are you intending to get the RM850, RM850x or RM850i? Because there are significant differences between all of them.

If you are NOT going to use a UPS, then yes, it should be connected directly to the wall socket unless you have a high quality industrial power strip or power line conditioner.

Most people buy and use power strips because they THINK that the fact it says surge protector means something. Usually, it doesn't. This is one of my favorite quotes on the subject from an electrical engineer and residential/commercial electrical journeyman I know.





Units you want to consider will be those sold by APC, Tripp-Lite, Leviton, Eaton, Leviton, General Electric, Polyphaser, Ditek, Siemens, ABB, Square D, Intermatic, Cutler-Hammer (Eaton), and Syscom, these are the brands you can trust to have high quality internal electronics if you MUST use a power strip but even so you STILL will want to ask around about specific models OR look to professional reviews as even these big boys occasionally have a product with some glaring flaw that makes it's way into the final product and might best be avoided compared to other available models.

Do not however use a power strip thinking that it offers significant protection, because even the best of them does not, not really. Whole house protection is the only real protection from surges.


Monster and Belkin, and a few others that are commonly used, almost unilaterally use the same protections in their 45 dollar surge protector strips as what you would find in an 8 dollar Amazon or Walmart branded model. And if you ever take one of these, or any cheap box store, dollar store (Even worse than these others usually BUT occasionally about the same) or Harbor Freight power strip apart you are likely to find frayed wires, poorly soldered connections with blobs of solder nearly touching crucial and potential short circuit points, super low quality MOVs, and a ton of other indicators that no real integrity was involved in the design or manufacturer of these units.


Another factor to keep in mind is that even with some of these high quality units, any protection that MIGHT be afforded, is usually the end of that product after one shot. This, directly from the Tripp-Lite manual for the #1 selling surge protection power strip in the world.





I believe many models from APC and a couple of the others I listed have now incorporated designs that permanently disengage any ability of the device to deliver power once a surge or short of significant enough caliber to incur the protection has occured. That basically means once there has been a surge or short, throw the device away. Even for high end models. Only whole house protection and properly earthed circuits offer any true protection from a serious surge or direct strike from lightning somewhere close enough to affect your segment of the grid.


And whatever you do, don't EVER buy any kind of extension cord, power strip or other electronic device with slip rings.


i will buy the RM850 one, not the RM850x nor RM850i
So.. do you think is a good choice to buy this one

CyberPower CP1500PFCLCD PFC Sinewave UPS System, 1500VA/1000W, 12 Outlets, AVR, Mini Tower

https://www.amazon.com/CyberPower-CP1500PFCLCD-Sinewave-Outlets-Mini-Tower/dp/B00429N19W/ref=sr_1_3?crid=3VWAQ0T4KY406&dchild=1&keywords=ups+pure+sine+wave&qid=1600839908&sprefix=ups+pure,aps,211&sr=8-3

It is worth it?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
That is not a pure sinewave unit. It is an "adaptive sine wave" UPS system.

Besides being the smallest, lightest, and cheapest unit in today’s roundup, the CP1500PFCLCD is also the only unit that has not fully replaced step-wave with pure-sine-wave circuitry, instead opting for a modified triangular wave that CyberPower calls “Adaptive Sinewave” to eliminate the zero power state that has so often prevented step-wave units from working with active PFC power supplies. This basically means that users get the enhanced compatibility of a sine wave unit at a low price similar to many step wave competitors.
That is not a unit I would recommend for use with the RM850. Find one that is "PURE sine wave".
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY