[SOLVED] Question regarding surge protectors and what maximum input means

WINTERLORD

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Sep 20, 2008
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I have an apc7 surge protector was replaced cause the original was from 20yrs ago I had a question they said there was a recall so I got the one I have and had it for roughly 7yrs no idea how old model 7is and I know some people will say replace it but on a budget for now but I have some questions

The surge protector say that the maximum input is 15amps so what exactly does that mean

Here's my dillema my graphics card prolly rock 20amp plus idk 2080 and depending on what the surge protector means as it says it's max input is15amp and doesn't specify output. Does that mean the surge protector I have is grossly unequiped to handle a 650watt psu and 2080 graphics card?

Now according to the page when the jewels get used up it will no longer work so I guess in 7yrs I hadn't used 800juels or whatever it is (yes I know 2000plus juels is recommended)

Here is the link to the detailed info https://www.apc.com/shop/us/en/products/APC-Personal-SurgeArrest-7-outlet-phone-line-protection/P-PER7T

Main question as above is this surge protector even though it claims to have failsafe grossly underrated for modern hardware?

What's in max input mean? To or from the wall and how is that possible 15amps when I know the psu draws 20plus amps there abouts
 

Eximo

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Okay, a lot of things to cover:

Joules is a measure of energy. Joules/Second = Watts
Amps is a measure of current, Coulombs (charge) per second

Joules don't get used up. That is simply a measure of the total energy that can be suppressed. When a surge suppressor is tripped, is is best to replace the unit since the components are basically sacrificing themselves to keep your connected devices safe. The joule rating and the input rating are unrelated.

15A input is typical for household electronics at 120 VAC, this is about 1800W, or 1500W in practice which is what most US household devices are limited to for safety of the wires. This is why you aren't supposed to connect multiple power strips together, because it is easy to overload a circuit with too many devices.

What is confusing you is that on the other side of your power supply you have DC current. So 12V at 20 Amps is only 240W. And your PSU will only consume what it needs.
A 650W output power supply is at most going to consume about 800W from the wall outlet, assuming around 80% efficiency and running flat out.
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
Okay, a lot of things to cover:

Joules is a measure of energy. Joules/Second = Watts
Amps is a measure of current, Coulombs (charge) per second

Joules don't get used up. That is simply a measure of the total energy that can be suppressed. When a surge suppressor is tripped, is is best to replace the unit since the components are basically sacrificing themselves to keep your connected devices safe. The joule rating and the input rating are unrelated.

15A input is typical for household electronics at 120 VAC, this is about 1800W, or 1500W in practice which is what most US household devices are limited to for safety of the wires. This is why you aren't supposed to connect multiple power strips together, because it is easy to overload a circuit with too many devices.

What is confusing you is that on the other side of your power supply you have DC current. So 12V at 20 Amps is only 240W. And your PSU will only consume what it needs.
A 650W output power supply is at most going to consume about 800W from the wall outlet, assuming around 80% efficiency and running flat out.
 

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